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Recovery Strategy for three Wolffish: Northern, Spotted & Atlantic (Proposed) 2007

Appendix A: Record Of Cooperation And Consultation

The Recovery Team includes representatives from industry, academia, and the provincial and federal governments. The populations of wolffish, in particular, the two threatened species are concentrated largely from the Grand Banks to the Labrador Shelf, which is the jurisdiction of DFO Newfoundland and Labrador Region, and waters adjacent to the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Thus, the majority of representation on the team was from this area. Industry was represented from leaders of both the inshore and offshore sectors. All sectors of DFO Newfoundland and Labrador were represented on the Team. Each Team member consulted extensively within their jurisdiction ensuring broad consultation such that key stakeholders were aware of and had the opportunity to input to the Plan.

The three species of wolffish are occasionally encountered in the Davis Strait. Thus, during development, elements of the Recovery Strategy and Management Plan were presented to the Nunavut Wildlife Management Board, and the Board was regularly informed of progress by the Team’s DFO Central and Arctic member.  Upon review of the proposed Recovery Strategy and Management Plan, the Nunavut Wildlife Management Board approved the document in January 2007.  A presentation was also made to the Conne River Band (Newfoundland and Labrador) on the Recovery Strategy and Management Plan for wolffish species, and on species at risk issues in general. As well, the National Aboriginal Council on Species at Risk (NACOSAR) was informed through David Cole about the activities of the Team.  Further, various Aboriginal owned fishing enterprises and Fisheries Product International (FPI) have been involved in recovery initiatives related to quantifying harm.

The team members, in the preparation of this National Wolffish Recovery Strategy and Management Plan, informed and received feedback from their respective jurisdictions.  In early 2007, the proposed document was also forwarded to the Governments of Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Quebec, Nunavut and Northwest Territories for review.  Resulting comments were incorporated where applicable.  

The Team wishes to thank the numerous reviewers of this document, from various sectors of the Newfoundland and Labrador Region, from other Atlantic Regions and NHQ. Special thanks goes to MEHM staff who worked on several sections related to habitat and CEAA and P&E staff from Newfoundland and Labrador, Quebec and Maritimes Regions who provided detailed economic analyses, to ensure best knowledge was included. The collective input of reviewers and contributors has ensured compliancy with SARA and has greatly enhanced the quality of a document that deals with a wide range of subject matter.


Figure 1, Map of Georges Bank to the Davis Strait, covering the distribution of wolffish species and showing various banks, basins and NAFO Divisions.

Figure 1, Map of Georges Bank to the Davis Strait, covering the distribution of wolffish species and showing various banks, basins and NAFO Divisions.


Figure 2a, Change in the distribution of A. denticulatus between 1980 and 2001 based on fall research surveys, Newfoundland and Labrador Region. Red shades depict areas of highest density, shading through yellow to green to blue as areas of lowest density. Sampling north of Lat.60°, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and on the Scotian Shelf is incomplete

Figure 2a, Change in the distribution of A. denticulatus between 1980 and 2001 based on fall research surveys, Newfoundland and Labrador Region. Red shades depict areas of highest density, shading through yellow to green to blue as areas of lowest density. Sampling north of Lat.60°, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and on the Scotian Shelf is incomplete.


Figure 2b, Change in the distribution of A. minor between 1980 and 2001 based on fall research surveys, Newfoundland and Labrador Region. Red shades depict areas of highest density, shading through yellow to green to blue as areas of lowest density. Sampling north of Lat. 60o, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and on the Scotian Shelf is incomplete.

Figure 2b, Change in the distribution of A. minorbetween 1980 and 2001 based on fall research surveys, Newfoundland and Labrador Region. Red shades depict areas of highest density, shading through yellow to green to blue as areas of lowest density. Sampling north of Lat. 60o, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and on the Scotian Shelf is incomplete.


Figure 2c, Change in the distribution of A. lupus between 1980 and 2001 based on fall research surveys, Newfoundland and Labrador Region. Red shades depict areas of highest density, shading through yellow to green to blue as areas of lowest density. Sampling north of Lat. 60°, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and on the Scotian Shelf is incomplete.

Figure 2c, Change in the distribution of A. lupusbetween 1980 and 2001 based on fall research surveys, Newfoundland and Labrador Region. Red shades depict areas of highest density, shading through yellow to green to blue as areas of lowest density. Sampling north of Lat. 60°, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and on the Scotian Shelf is incomplete.


Figure 3, Change in the area of occupancy of A. denticulatus, A. minor and A. lupus between 1980 and 2001 based on fall research surveys, Newfoundland and Labrador Region (includes the Grand Bank, northeast Newfoundland Shelf and southern Labrador Shelf

Figure 3, Change in the area of occupancy of A. denticulatus, A. minor and A. lupus between 1980 and 2001 based on fall research surveys, Newfoundland and Labrador Region (includes the Grand Bank, northeast Newfoundland Shelf and southern Labrador Shelf


Figure 4a, Trends in abundance (lower panel) and biomass (upper panel) indices for A. denticulatus from 1977-2001. Indices were derived from fall Newfoundland and Labrador research surveys. The northern area (2J3K) trend is shown separately from the southern area (3LNO). The dark vertical bar separates the two time series. Engel trawl was used prior to the fall of 1995, Campelen in subsequent years (after Simpson and Kulka 2002).

Figure 4a, Trends in abundance (lower panel) and biomass (upper panel) indices forA. denticulatus from 1977-2001. Indices were derived from fall Newfoundland and Labrador research surveys. The northern area (2J3K) trend is shown separately from the southern area (3LNO). The dark vertical bar separates the two time series. Engel trawl was used prior to the fall of 1995, Campelen in subsequent years (after Simpson and Kulka 2002).


Figure 4 b, Trends in abundance (lower panel) and biomass (upper panel) indices for A. minor from 1977-2001. Indices were derived from fall Newfoundland and Labrador research surveys. The northern area (2J3K) trend is shown separately from the southern area (3LNO). The dark vertical bar separates the two time series. Engel trawl was used prior to the fall of 1995, Campelen in subsequent years (after Simpson and Kulka 2002).

Figure 4 b, Trends in abundance (lower panel) and biomass (upper panel) indices for A. minor from 1977-2001. Indices were derived from fall Newfoundland and Labrador research surveys. The northern area (2J3K) trend is shown separately from the southern area (3LNO). The dark vertical bar separates the two time series. Engel trawl was used prior to the fall of 1995, Campelen in subsequent years (after Simpson and Kulka 2002).


Figure 4 c, Trends in abundance (lower panel) and biomass (upper panel) indices for A. lupus from 1977-2001. Indices were derived from fall Newfoundland and Labrador research surveys. The northern area (2J3K) trend is shown separately from the southern area (3LNO). The dark vertical bar separates the two time series. Engel trawl was used prior to the fall of 1995, Campelen in subsequent years (after Simpson and Kulka 2002).

Figure 4 c, Trends in abundance (lower panel) and biomass (upper panel) indices for A. lupus from 1977-2001. Indices were derived from fall Newfoundland and Labrador research surveys. The northern area (2J3K) trend is shown separately from the southern area (3LNO). The dark vertical bar separates the two time series. Engel trawl was used prior to the fall of 1995, Campelen in subsequent years (after Simpson and Kulka 2002).


Figure 5, Wolffish Landings and Value (1995-2002), Newfoundland and Labrador Region

Figure 5, Wolffish Landings and Value (1995-2002), Newfoundland and Labrador Region


Figure 6, Average Wolffish Landings (Kg) and Value ($) by NAFO (Sub) Division, Newfoundland and Labrador Region (1995-2002).

Figure 6, Average Wolffish Landings (Kg) and Value ($) by NAFO (Sub) Division, Newfoundland and Labrador Region (1995-2002).


Figure 7, Economic statistical areas by number and name, Newfoundland and Labrador Region (see Figure 1).

Figure 7, Economic statistical areas by number and name, Newfoundland and Labrador Region (see Figure 1).