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COSEWIC Annual Report 2004

ANNUAL REPORT

TO

THE MINISTER OF THE ENVIRONMENT

AND

THE CANADIAN ENDANGERED SPECIES

CONSERVATION COUNCIL

FROM

THE COMMITTEE ON THE STATUS OF

ENDANGERED WILDLIFE IN CANADA

(COSEWIC)

September 16, 2004

 

COSEWIC Logo



COMMITTEE ON THE                   COMITÉ SUR LA SITUATION
STATUS OF ENDANGERED          DES ESPÈCES EN PÉRIL
WILDLIFE IN CANADA                AU CANADA

July 19, 2004

The Honourable David Anderson
Minister of the Environment and co-chair of the Canadian
Endangered Species Conservation Council
Government of Canada
OTTAWA ON K1A 0H3

Dear Minister Anderson:

The 2004 Annual Report to the Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council (CESCC) from the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) is respectfully submitted to you and CESCC in accordance with the requirements under the Species at Risk Act (SARA).

This report includes a summary of all activities undertaken by COSEWIC over the past year (Section 26 of SARA).

This report provides the names, justifications and biosketches of members whom COSEWIC recommends for your appointment effective January 1, 2005 (Section 16 of SARA).

Also included for your consideration is a list of the species status assessments (with reasons) from the November 2003 and May 2004 Species Assessment Meetings (Section 25 of SARA).

In addition, this report includes for your approval, documents outlining significant COSEWIC operations and procedures changes.

This report also contains a copy of the May 2004 publication "Canadian Species at Risk" which provides a complete list of wildlife species assessed by COSEWIC since its inception (Section 25 of SARA).

Yours sincerely,


Marco Festa-Bianchet
Chair of COSEWIC

 

ITEM I - COSEWIC ACTIVITIES

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1. SPECIES ASSESSMENT MEETING - FALL

Date:    November 24-28, 2003
Location:    Ottawa, Ontario
Attendance
Members - 42 members/alternates
Secretariat Staff - 8
Observers - 13 (2 from WWF-Canada, 2 from Canadian Wildlife Federation, 2 students McGill University,1 from the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, 1 from Fisheries & Oceans Canada and 5 from the Canadian Wildlife Service).
Regrets - 2 members/alternates (Prince Edward Island and Saskatchewan)

At the first meeting of COSEWIC (Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada) since the passage of SARA (Species At Risk Act), the committee members reviewed the conservation status of 23 species.

2. SPECIES ASSESSMENT MEETING - SPRING

Date:    May 3-7, 2004
Location:    Bird Studies Canada, Port Rowan, Ontario
Attendance
Members - 41 members/alternates
Secretariat Staff - 7
Observers - 30 (1 from Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, 1 from the Department of Natural Resources, New Brunswick, 1 from Fisheries & Oceans Canada, 1 from Parks Canada, 1 from the COSEWIC Molluscs Specialist Subcommittee, 2 from Canadian Wildlife Service, Ontario Region, 1 from the Canadian Wildlife Service Headquarters, 3 from World Wildlife Fund Canada, 12 from Bird Studies Canada, 5 from McGill University, 1 from Upper Thames River Conservation Authority, 1 from Norfolk Field Naturalists)

Regrets - 2 members/alternates (Canadian Museum of Nature and Saskatchewan)

Teleconference
Six Wildlife Management Boards participated in a teleconference with COSEWIC to discuss the draft proposal for working together that was developed from discussions at the meeting and workshop held in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory in April, 2003. The decisions arrived at during the teleconference have been incorporated into the COSEWIC Operations and Procedures Manual.

3. SUMMARY OF SPECIES ASSESSMENT MEETINGS (NOVEMBER & MAY)

During the last year, COSEWIC met twice (in November 2003 and in May 2004) to assess or reassess the status of 59 species, subspecies and populations. The species assessment results include the following:

Endangered: Horned Lark strigata subspecies, Northern Bobwhite, White Sturgeon, Sand Verbena Moth, Butternut, Dwarf Woolly-heads, Slender Collomia, Small-flowered Tonella, Beluga Whale (Eastern Hudson Bay population and Ungava Bay population), Peary Caribou, Red Crossbill perca subspecies, Prairie Skink, Spotted Turtle, Small-mouthed Salamander, Porbeagle Shark, Round Pigtoe, Bog Bird's-foot Trefoil, Dwarf Sandwort, Pink Sand-verbena, Rosy Owl-clover, Stoloniferous Pussytoes.
Threatened: Short-tailed Albatross, Dakota Skipper, Powesheik Skipperling, Branched Bartonia, Dwarf Hackberry, Porsild's Bryum, Beluga Whale (St. Lawrence Estuary population and Cumberland Sound population), Plains Bison, Loggerhead Shrike excubitorides subspecies, Pink-footed Shearwater, Western Rattlesnake, Gulf of St. Lawrence Aster, Victorin's Gentian, Flooded Jellyskin.
Special Concern: Harbour Porpoise, Rocky Mountain Ridged Mussel , Steller Sea Lion, Barren-ground Caribou (Dolphin and Union population), Beluga Whale (Western Hudson Bay population and Eastern High Arctic - Baffin Bay population), Grey Whale, Spotted Bat, Yellow Lampmussel, Eastern Lilaeopsis, New Jersey Rush, Victorin's Water-hemlock, Columbian Carpet Moss, Twisted Oak Moss.

As of May, 2004, the COSEWIC list of Canadian Species at Risk comprises 456 species in various categories, including 169 endangered species, 114 threatened speces and 140 species of special concern. In addition, 21 species are extirpated (no longer existing in the wild in Canada) and 12 are extinct.

Note: There are now twelve species from SARA's Schedule 2 left to be reassessed by June, 2006.

Appendix l (COSEWIC Press Releases from the two Assessment meetings)

  • Draft of the Terms of Reference for the ATK Subcommittee - reviewed and approved (Note: Awaiting endorsement by National Aboriginal Organizations).
  • Prioritization process for candidate lists of species - developed.
  • Designatable units - final document approved by COSEWIC and now included in the Operations & Procedures Manual
  • Application for Species Assessment and submission of unsolicited Species Status Reports - guidelines and template recommended
  • Schedule 2 species reassessment deadlines - confirmation that these will be respected
  • Identifying and reporting uncertainties in species status assessment - draft approach discussed and approved.

4. ANNUAL SPECIES SPECIALIST SUBCOMMITTEES MEETINGS

Amphibians & Reptiles Specialist Subcommittee
November 8, 2003
Holiday Inn, Guelph, Ontario
Members: 9 including 2 co-chairs
Secretariat: 1
Observers: 4 students
Summary of key discussion items: membership; technical summaries; draft atlas of British Columbia amphibians and reptiles; five species status evaluations and recommendations; candidate list species; suggestion for future symposium and workshop COSEWIC on species ranges and mapping ranges.

Arthropods Specialist Subcommittee (Lepidopterans)
July 28-29, 2003
Biological Sciences Building, University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta
Members: 9 including co-chair
Secretariat: 1
Observers: 2 (David Duncan, Canadian Wildlife Service, Prairie & Northern Region and Gregory Pohl, Natural Resources Canada)
Summary of key discussion items: The proposed split of the Lepidopterans and Molluscs Specialist Subcommittee and the formation and possible functioning of the Arthropods Specialist Subcommittee; Subcommittee members and conflict of interest; guidelines for determining designatable units and revised instructions for writers of status reports; updates on three species; priority list of species for commissioning status reports; interim status report on two species and status recommendations for these species; and the prioritization scheme for butterflies.

Birds Specialist Subcommittee
September 6-7, 2003
Naramata Centre, Naramata, British Columbia
Members: 6 including 2 co-chairs
Secretariat: 1
Observers: 0

Summary of key discussion items: Seven species status reports and editorial changes; Candidate list was reviewed; Upcoming changes in membership

Freshwater Fishes Specialist Subcommittee
September 13-14, 2003
Huntsman Marine Science Centre, St. Andrews, New Brunswick
Members: 8 including 2 co-chairs
Secretariat: 1
Observers: 0
Summary of key discussion items: review of report schedule, Operations & Procedures Manual update review; three species status evaluations with recommendations; candidate list; improving quality of status reports; possible species name change; membership; template for SSC reviews; ecoregions map and intellectual property issues re potential report writers.
Amphibians & Reptiles Specialist Subcommittee
Summary of Discussion Items:

Marine Fishes Specialist Subcommittee
September 13-14, 2003
Huntsman Marine Science Centre, St. Andrews, New Brunswick
Members: 9 including co-chairs
Secretariat: 1
Observers: 1 from Huntsman Marine Science Centre
Summary of key discussion items: Information to be included in reports and the convention to use, a hands-on workshop to examine statistical approaches applied to scientific survey data, specific examples based on winter skate and porbeagle of how the program RAMAS Redlist could be applied to marine fish species; a detailed update on designatable units in Pacific salmon; continued progress on our Pacific candidate list which resulted in dropping 29 species and adding 13; General Status exercise led by the Department of Fisheries & Oceans identified as helpful in this matter; Status was suggested for two species; discussion of reports on four deepwater species was deferred in favour of the hands-on workshop pending resolution of some statistical issues in these reports; progress on another species report was also discussed.

Marine Mammals Specialist Subcommittee
October 4-5, 2003
Navigator Inn, Iqaluit, Nunavut
Members: 7 including 2 co-chairs
COSEWIC Secretariat: 2
Observers: 7 (2 from Fisheries & Oceans Canada, Iqaluit; 3 from the Quikiqtaaluk Wildlife Board, Nunavut; 1 from the Nunavut Wildlife Management Board and 1 community member, Iqaluit)
Summary of key discussion items: The meeting began with a public session from 9:00-12:00. Presentations were made by Hal Whitehead and Andrew Trites on COSEWIC's mandates, the Species at Risk Act, the role of the SSC, the assessment process, status designations and emergency assessments. Presentations were also made by Joannie Ikkidluak and Abraham Kaunak about the Wildlife Board, and by Gloria Goulet on the use of Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge by COSEWIC. Translations greatly aided the question and answer periods.

Six species status reports were reviewed and discussed in detail. The status of three outstanding species reports was also reviewed.

Molluscs Specialist Subcommittee
October 17-18, 2003
Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History
Halifax, Nova Scotia
Members: 7 including 1 co-chair
Secretariat: 1
Observers: 7 (3 from the Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History
1 from Nova Scotia Natural Resources (member of COSEWIC), 1 Soil & Water Conservation Society of Metro Halifax, 1 New Brunswick Museum, 1 Co-chair of the Recovery Team (Atlantic Whitefish) and member of the Recovery Team (Blanding's Turtle)

Summary of key discussion items: The public forum part of the meeting was held in the morning of the 17th and was attended by seven observers. During the public forum, Dr. Buster Welch, who retired from the Subcommittee, was thanked for his valuable contribution to the Molluscs Group for several years and was presented with a plaque in recognition of his work. Presentations were given to the public by Gerry Mackie explaining the work of COSEWIC and by Janice Smith on the work of the National General Status Working Group and particularly her work as Coordinator for Freshwater Mussels. Standard quantitative and qualitative sampling methods for aquatic and terrestrial molluscs were discussed and a motion was passed to provide references to published methodologies to all report writers when reports are first commissioned. Dr. Eva Pip and Dr. Stuart Harris are currently writing up standard sampling methods for freshwater gastropods. Changes to the "Operations & Procedures Manual" and to the "Instructions for Report Writers" were discussed with reference to the needs of the mollusc Species Specialist Subcommittee.

During the closed session part of the meeting, the Mollusc SSC reviewed the prioritization and candidate lists. A list of potential report writers will be generated and given to the Secretariat so the writers may be notified when calls are posted on COSEWIC's web site. Six draft status reports were discussion and status recommendations were provided.

Plants & Lichens Specialist Subcommittee
October 18-19, 2003
Lord Elgin Hotel, Ottawa, Ontario
Members: 14 including 2 co-chairs
Secretariat : 2
Observers : 0
Summary of key discussion items: Candidate Lists; Mosses and Liverworts; Lichens; Macro Algae; Standardization of Names; Status Report Content; Fragmentation; Twenty-four Vascular Plant draft reports and eight moss reports were reviewed and recommendations given.

Terrestrial Mammals Specialist Subcommittee
November 21, 2003
Royal Ontario Museum
Toronto, Ontario
Members: 7 including 2 co-chairs
Secretariat: 1
Observers: 1 (Nunavut Wildlife Management Board via teleconference)
Summary of key discussion items: Membership on the Species Specialist Subcommittee; status recommendations for species to be assessed at the November 2003 and May 2004 COSEWIC meetings and progress on status reports in preparation.

 

ITEM II - ELECTION OF CHAIR OF COSEWIC

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Following procedures set out in the Operations & Procedures Manual, a nominating committee was struck, chaired by Jeff Hutchings. Marco Festa-Bianchet's name was submitted for renewal as chair of COSEWIC. There were no other nominees and Marco was voted in as chair of COSEWIC for a further two-year term effective May 7, 2004.

 

ITEM III - COSEWIC MEMBERSHIP

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Membership Changes

For Information:

See Appendix Il for a list of current and proposed members.

For Approval:

a)    Members from jurisdictions (Provincial /Territorial/Federal) -

At the Spring, 2004 meeting of COSEWIC, the chair reminded members from jurisdictions that CESCC members have to notify the Chair of COSEWIC by July 1, 2004 of the name of any new member or alternate to be submitted to the Minister of the Environment for appointment after consulting with the CESCC.
A curriculum vitae for each nominee will be on record with the COSEWIC Secretariat.

b)   Non-government members and Co-chairs of Species Specialist Subcommittees - New /Renewed Members were selected as a result of a January 2004 public call for members. Justifications and biosketches are herein provided for the following nominees submitted for consideration and review by CESCC and subsequent appointment by the Minister of the Environment effective January 1, 2005:

Non-government Member - Dr. Jeff Hutchings

Co-chair, Amphibians & Reptiles Specialist Subcommittee - Dr. David Green
Co-chair, Arthropods Specialist Subcommittee - Dr. Paul Catling
Co-chair, Arthropods Specialist Subcommittee - Dr. Theresa Fowler*
Co-chair, Birds Specialist Subcommittee - Richard (Dick) Cannings
Co-chair, Marine Mammals Specialist Subcommittee - Dr. Randall Reeves
Co-chair, Molluscs Specialist Subcommittee - Janice Smith

 

* - All memberships are for a four year term with the exception of Dr. Theresa Fowler who was recommended for renewal for two years so that in future, both co-chairs' positions are not vacated at the same time.

See Appendix III (Biosketches).

 

ITEM IV - COSEWIC OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES

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Suggested Term Limits for Co-chairs

Co-chairs (and non-government members) that have completed two consecutive terms beginning with their ministerial appointments are encouraged to consider not applying for a third term. When a co-chair (or a non-government member) has completed three consecutive terms, the Chair of COSEWIC will advise the selection committee to particularly consider other qualified candidates that may apply for that position.

Decision making procedure during meetings

Species assessments when consensus is not easily and quickly reached will no longer be automatically deferred to a second round of deliberations. Individual discussions will carry on until the assessment has been completed.

Voting

When consensus is not reached, all votes will now be conducted electronically, such that each member's ballot is secret. Previously, voting was by show of hands except when a secret vote was requested and agreed to.

Instructions for the Preparation of COSEWIC Status Reports


Extensive revisions to this document continued into February 2004, after which the document was posted on the COSEWIC website together with COSEWIC's Call for Bids to prepare COSEWIC status reports.

Involvement of Wildlife Management Boards

Wildlife Management Boards will be invited as observers to
Species Specialist Subcommittee meetings.
Relevant Wildlife Management Boards will be invited to participate as non-voting members during emergency assessment determinations.
Wildlife Management Boards will be invited to participate in the teleconference with The Canadian Wildlife Directors Committee following each Species Assessment Meeting.

Summary - Documents Recommended for Approval

Appendix IV - Terms of Reference: COSEWIC Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge Subcommittee
Appendix V - Assessment Process, Categories and Guidelines
Appendix VI - Applications for Species Assessment and Unsolicited Species Status Reports

 

ITEM V - SPECIES STATUS ASSIGNMENTS

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List of Species assessed since the last reporting indicating status assigned, reasons (including uncertainties where applicable and COSEWIC Criteria (with alphanumeric codes.

See Appendix VII

List of status reports available on the Public Registry - www.sararegistry.gc.ca in English and French.

 

ITEM VI - COMPLETE LIST OF WILDIFE SPECIES ASSESSED BY COSEWIC SINCE ITS INCEPTION

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Herein provided is the May 2004 COSEWIC List of Canadian Species at Risk. This publication is available on the Public Registry.

See Appendix VIII (enclosed)

Return to Table of Contents

Appendix I

 

COSEWIC Logo


PRESS RELEASES


Ottawa, November 28, 2003

At the first meeting of COSEWIC (Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada) since the passage of SARA (Species At Risk Act), the committee members reviewed the conservation status of 23 species.

The Steller Sea Lion was designated as a species of Special Concern because of the small number of breeding sites, as well as its susceptibility to human disturbance and oil spills. This species occurs on islands off the coast of British Columbia. In the past, Steller Sea Lion populations were reduced by intensive culls intended to reduce predation on fish. These programmes were discontinued in the 1950s, and populations now show some increase. One breeding group in British Columbia was driven to extinction and overall populations remain below historic levels (early 1900s). Steller Sea Lions are threatened or endangered elsewhere in their range (United States and Russia).

The White Sturgeon, the largest freshwater fish in Canada, was designated as Endangered. In Canada, this species only occurs in British Columbia where several populations are in decline. The great scarcity of fish younger than 30-40 years in most rivers suggests that few young are surviving. Long life span and small populations make White Sturgeon extremely vulnerable to any harvest and habitat degradation such as caused by dams. An additional threat to this species is the black market demand for their meat and roe (caviar).

On the Prairies, two species of butterflies (the Dakota Skipper and the Poweshiek Skipperling) were designated as Threatened. Both species depend on remnant prairie habitats and are threatened by prescribed burns, fragmentation of their grassland habitats and the timing of haying.

Butternut, a relatively short-lived tree occurring in Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick, was designated as Endangered. Butternut produces edible nuts and is of special importance to many Aboriginal Peoples. The tree is widespread and infrequent but is widely impacted by an exotic disease (the Butternut Canker) that is spreading rapidly.

"In this meeting, we examined four status reports on species for which COSEWIC concluded that the information was not sufficient to assign status. More resources must be invested in the study of Canada's flora and fauna to provide decision makers and planners with adequate information for effective conservation" said Dr. Marco Festa-Bianchet, Chair of COSEWIC.

Limitations imposed by a lack of information have important repercussions for assessment. For example, in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, the rare Squat Duskysnail is known from a small number of scattered localities and was considered to be Data Deficient. Little is known about how widespread it is or the numbers of these snails in Canadian streams and lakes.

In coastal British Columbia, Keen's Long-eared Bat has a wide range but may depend on old growth forest. The bat is rarely recorded and difficult to sample. Lack of information about its population size and the difficulty of identifying this species led to its designation as Data Deficient.

There are now 441 species in various COSEWIC risk categories, including 160 Endangered, 108 Threatened, and 140 of Special Concern. In addition, 21 species are Extirpated (no longer found in the wild in Canada), 12 are Extinct, and 32 are Data Deficient.

COSEWIC's assessments will be forwarded to the federal Minister of the Environment and will form the basis for inclusion in the legal list of species at risk under the Species at Risk Act.

COSEWIC assesses the national status of wild species, subspecies, varieties, or other designatable units that are considered to be at risk in Canada. COSEWIC comprises members from each provincial and territorial government wildlife agency, four federal entities (Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, and the Federal Biosystematics Partnership, chaired by the Canadian Museum of Nature), three non-jurisdictional members and the co-chairs of the species specialist and the Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge subcommittees.

Definition of COSEWIC terms and risk categories

Species: Any indigenous species, subspecies, variety, or geographically or genetically distinct population of wild fauna and flora.

Extinct: A species that no longer exists.
Extirpated: A species no longer existing in the wild in Canada, but occurring elsewhere.
Endangered: A species facing imminent extirpation or extinction.
Threatened: A species likely to become endangered if limiting factors are not reversed.
Special Concern: A species of special concern because of characteristics that make it particularly sensitive to human activities or natural events.
Not at Risk: A species that has been evaluated and found not to be at risk.
Data Deficient: A species for which there is insufficient scientific information to support status designation.

For further information, contact:

Dr. Marco Festa-Bianchet
Chair, COSEWIC
Marco.Festa-Bianchet@usherbrooke.ca   
General inquiries:
COSEWIC Secretariat
(819) 953-3215

 

For inquiries on the Steller Sea Lion:
Dr. Andrew Trites
Co-chair, Marine Mammals Specialist
Subcommittee
(604) 822-8181
(604) 318-6357
trites@zoology.ubc.ca   

 

For inquiries on the White Sturgeon:
Dr. Robert Campbell
Co-chair, Freshwater Fishes Specialist Subcommittee
(613) 987-5367
racambel@cyberus.ca

 

For inquires on the butterflies:
Dr. Theresa Fowler
Co-chair, Arthropods Specialist Subcommittee
(819) 953-6402
Theresa.aniskowicz@ec.gc.ca

 

For inquiries on the Butternut:
Dr. Erich Haber
Co-chair, Plants and Lichens Specialist Subcommittee
(613) 722-5523
erich.haber@rogers.com

 

For inquiries on the Squat Duskysnail:
Dr. Gerald Mackie
Co-chair, Molluscs Specialist Subcommittee
(519) 824-4120 ext. 3505
gmackie@uoguelph.ca

 

For inquiries on the Keen's Long-eared Bat:
Dr. Brock Fenton
Co-chair, Terrestrial Mammals Specialist Subcommittee
(416) 736-2100 ext.22664
bfenton@yorku.ca


   
Further details on the species assessed, and the reasons behind each designation, can be found on the COSEWIC website at:
www.cosewic.gc.ca

COSEWIC Logo


Port Rowan, Ontario, May 7, 2004

In the heart of Canada's biologically diverse Carolinian zone, home to over a hundred species at risk, the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) met to assess the conservation status of 36 wildlife species.

One of the Carolinian species considered was the Round Pigtoe. This freshwater mussel that is now found only in Lake St.Clair, and three other Southwestern Ontario watersheds, is endangered by the exotic invasive Zebra Mussel, and by deteriorating water quality. There are now eight mussel species considered Endangered in Southern Ontario.

Two northern mammals, the Beluga Whale and the Peary Caribou, were among the better known species reviewed. Of seven populations of Beluga Whales, only that in the Beaufort Sea is now considered not to be at risk of extinction. Historical overhunting and, for some populations, current unsustainable harvesting, are believed to be the most significant threats. Other threats include contamination and habitat degradation. The endangered Peary Caribou continues to decline possibly due to changes in the Arctic climate. This decline has continued despite voluntary restrictions on hunting by northern residents.

The first shark ever to be assessed by COSEWIC, the Porbeagle, was designated as Endangered. The Porbeagle has declined by an estimated 90% since the 1960's, and the main threat appears to come from overfishing. Although quotas have been reduced and breeding areas closed to fishing under the current management plan, the Porbeagle's life history characteristics, including late maturity and low birth rate, render this species particularly vulnerable to over-exploitation.

Several plant species found only in Canada are also deemed to be at risk, including the Gulf of St.Lawrence Aster and Victorin's Gentian, both assessed as Threatened. COSEWIC noted that all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) pose a threat to seven of the twelve plant species they considered at this meeting. ATVs can cause soil erosion and directly destroy plants.
COSEWIC assessed the status of the Plains Bison, an animal that was once a major component of Canada's prairie ecosystem where it numbered in the millions. Fewer than one thousand free-ranging Plains Bison occur in Canada today. "Let's learn from this tragedy, and redouble our efforts to protect species at risk and their habitats" said Marco Festa-Bianchet, chair of COSEWIC.

Other species assessed included the Prairie Skink, Spotted Turtle, Stoloniferous Pussytoes, Pink-footed Shearwater, Western Rattlesnake, Grey Whale and Spotted Bat.

There are now 456 species in various COSEWIC risk categories, including 169 Endangered, 114 Threatened, and 140 of Special Concern. In addition, 21 species are Extirpated (no longer found in the wild in Canada), 12 are Extinct, and 33 are Data Deficient.

COSEWIC's assessments will be forwarded to the federal Minister of the Environment and will form the basis for inclusion in the legal list of species at risk under the Species at Risk Act.

COSEWIC assesses the national status of wild species, subspecies, varieties, or other designatable units that are considered to be at risk in Canada. COSEWIC comprises members from each provincial and territorial government wildlife agency, four federal entities (Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, and the Federal Biosystematics Partnership, chaired by the Canadian Museum of Nature), three non-jurisdictional members and the co-chairs of the species specialist and the Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge subcommittees.

COSEWIC is very grateful to Bird Studies Canada for providing facilities and logistical support for this meeting.

Definition of COSEWIC terms and risk categories

Species: Any indigenous species, subspecies, variety, or geographically or genetically distinct population of wild fauna and flora.

Extinct: A species that no longer exists.
Extirpated: A species no longer existing in the wild in Canada, but occurring elsewhere.
Endangered: A species facing imminent extirpation or extinction.
Threatened: A species likely to become endangered if limiting factors are not reversed.
Special Concern: A species that may become a threatened or an endangered species because of a combination of biological characteristics and identified threats.
Not at Risk: A species that has been evaluated and found not to be at risk.
Data Deficient: A species for which there is insufficient scientific information to support status designation.

For further information, contact:

For general inquiries and for inquiries on Peary Caribou:
Dr. Marco Festa-Bianchet
Chair, COSEWIC
(613) 296-1937
(819) 821-8000 ext. 2061
Marco.Festa-Bianchet@usherbrooke.ca
General inquiries:
COSEWIC Secretariat
(819) 953-3215
www.cosewic.gc.ca

 

For inquiries on the Porbeagle Shark:
Dr. Richard Haedrich
Co-chair, Marine Fishes Specialist Subcommittee
(802)649-3028   

 

For inquiries on the Beluga:
Dr. Andrew Trites
Co-chair, Marine Mammals Specialist
Subcommittee
(604) 318-6357
(604) 822-8183
trites@zoology.ubc.ca

 

For inquiries on the Round Pigtoe:
Dr. Gerald Mackie
Co-chair, Molluscs Specialist Subcommittee
(519) 824-4120 ext. 53505
gmackie@uoguelph.ca

 

For inquiries on the Gulf of St.Lawrence Aster and Victorin's Gentian:
Dr. Erich Haber
Co-chair, Plants and Lichens Specialist Subcommittee
(613) 722-5523
erich.haber@rogers.com

Further details on all species assessed, and the reasons behind each designation, can be found on the COSEWIC website at:
www.cosewic.gc.ca


Return to Table of Contents

Appendix II

 

(* Names of new members provided to COSEWIC in 2004 are indicated in bold.)

Table 1/Tableau 1: Appointment of COSEWIC members and alternates from provinces, territories and federal agencies. The duration of the term for all members appearing in this table is 4 years, starting on the date of the proclamation of the Species at Risk Act, June 5th, 2003 until June 5th, 2007.
JurisdictionMemberAlternate

Alberta

 

Gordon Court
Provincial Wildlife Status Biologist
Resource Data and Species at Risk
Fish and Wildlife Division
Dept. of Sustainable Resource Development
Government of Alberta
7th Floor, O.S. Longman Building
6909 - 116 Street
EdmontonAB T6H 4P2
Steve Brechtel
Head
Resource Data and Species at Risk
Fish and Wildlife Division
Dept. of Sustainable Resource Development
Government of Alberta
7th Floor, O.S. Longman Building
6909 - 116 Street
EdmontonAB T6H 4P2
British ColumbiaDave Fraser
Endangered Species Specialist
Biodiversity Branch
Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Section
Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection
Government of British Columbia
P.O. Box 9338 -Station Prov Govt
VictoriaBC V8V 9M1
Juanita Ptolemy
Species Specialist
Biodiversity Branch
Aquatic Ecosystem Science Section
B.C. Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection
Government of British Columbia
P.O. Box 9338 -Station Prov Govt
VictoriaBC V8W 9M1
ManitobaDr. James Duncan
Manager
Biodiversity Conservation Section
Wildlife and Ecosystem Protection
Branch
ManitobaConservation
P.O. Box24
200 Saulteaux Crescent
WinnipegMB R3J 3W3
Martin Erickson*
Fisheries Biologist
Aquatic Ecosystem Section
Fisheries Branch
Manitoba Water Stewardship
Box 20 , 200 Saulteaux Crescent
Winnipeg , MB R3J 3W3 
New BrunswickDr. Maureen Toner
Biologist
Species at Risk Program
Fish and Wildlife Branch
Department of Natural Resources
P.O. Box6000
FrederictonNB E3B 5H1
Dwayne L. Sabine
Biologist
Species at Risk Program
Fish and Wildlife Branch
Department of Natural Resources
P.O. Box6000
Fredericton , NB E3B 5H1

Newfoundland
and Labrador
(For all Species
other than Marine
Fish)

 

Joseph Brazil
Chief
Endangered Species and Biodiversity Section
Inland Fish and Wildlife Division
Department of Tourism, Culture and Recreation
Government of Newfoundland and Labrador
P.O. Box2007
50 Main Street, Commerce Court
Corner Brook NL A2H 7S1

Nathalie Djan-Chékar
Curator of Botany
Natural History Unit
Provincial Museum of Newfoundland & Labrador
P.O. Box8700
St. John’s NL A1B 4J6

 

Newfoundland
and Labrador
(Marine Pelagic
and Demersal
Fish Species)
Tom Dooley
Director of Resource Policy and Development
Policy and Planning
Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture
Government of Newfoundland and Labrador
P.O. Box8700
St. John'sNL A1B 4J6
David Coffin
Supervisor
Fisheries Resource Planning and Development
Policy and Planning
Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture
Government of Newfoundland and Labrador
P.O. Box8700
St. John'sNL A1B 4J6

Northwest
Territories

 

Dr. Suzanne Carrière
Ecosystem Management Biologist
Wildlife and Fisheries Division
Department of Resources, Wildlife and Economic Development
Government of the Northwest Territories
600 - 5102 50th Avenue
ScotiaCentre, 5th Floor
Yellowknife NT X1A 3S8
Tom Lakusta*
Manager, Forest Resources
Forest Management
Department of Resources,
Wildlife and Economic Development
Government of the Northwest
Territories
PO Box 1320
Yellowknife NT X1A 2L9
Nova ScotiaDr. J. Sherman Boates
Manager
Wildlife Division
Department of Natural Resources
Government of Nova Scotia
136 Exhibition Street
KentvilleNS B4N 4E5
Mark F. Elderkin
Wildlife Division
Nova Scotia Dept. of Natural
Resources
Government of Nova Scotia
136 Exhibition Street
KentvilleNS B4N 4E5
Nunavut TerritoryMichael Setterington
Ecosystems Biologist
Department of Environment
Government of Nunavut
PO Box 120
Arviat NU X0C 0E0

Vacant

 

OntarioAlan Dextrase
Aquatic SAR Biologist
Species At Risk section
Ontario Parks
OntarioMinistry of Natural
Resources
P.O. Box7000
PeterboroughON K9J 8M5
Michael Oldham*
Botanist/Herpetologist
Ontario Natural Heritage
Information Centre (NHIC)
Ontario Ministry of Natural
Resources
P.O. Box 7000
Peterborough ON K9J 8M5 

Prince Edward
Island

 

Rosemary Curley
Program Manager
Protected Areas and Biodiversity Conservation
Conservation and Management Division
PEI Dept. Fisheries, Aquaculture and Environment
11 Kent St.
P.O. Box2000 , Jones Bldg,
Charlottetown PE C1A 7N8
Barry MacPhee
Manager of Marine Fisheries
PEI Department of Fisheries,
Aquaculture and Environment
11 Kent St.
P.O. Box2000 , Jones Bldg,
CharlottetownPE C1A 7N8

Quebec
(Plants)

 

Line Couillard
Ministère de l'Environnement
Direction du patrimoine écologique
et du développement durable
Édifice Marie-Guyart, 4e étage
675, boul. René-Lévesque Est
Québec QC G1R 5V7

Vacant

 

Quebec
(Fauna)

 

Daniel Banville*
Société de la faune et des parcs
du Québec
Direction du développement de
la faune
Édifice Marie-Guyart
675 boulevard René Levesque
est
boîte 92, 11e étage
Québec QC G1R 5V7
Jacques Jutras*
Société de la faune et des parcs
du Québec
Direction du développement de
la faune
Édifice Marie-Guyart
675 boulevard René Levesque
est
boîte 92, 11e étage
Québec QC G1R 5V7 
SaskatchewanJeanette Pepper
Zoologist
SaskatchewanConservation Data
Centre
Resource Stewardship Branch
Saskatchewan Environment
Government of Saskatchewan
3211 Albert Street - Room 436
Regina SK S4S 5W6
Dr. Robert Wright
Plant ecologist
Forest Services Group
Saskatchewan Environment
Government of Saskatchewan
3211 Albert Street
ReginaSK S4S 5W6
Yukon Territory

Thomas Jung
Senior Biologist
Department of Environment
Fish and Wildlife Branch
Government of Yukon
P.O. Box2703
Whitehorse YT Y1A 2C6

 

Syd Cannings*
NatureServe Yukon
Yukon Department of
the Environment
Box 2703
Whitehorse YT Y1A 2C6

 

Federal
Biodiversity
Information
Partnership
(Canadian
Museum of
Nature)
Dr. Robert Anderson
Entomology Research Scientist
CanadianMuseumof Nature
P.O. Box 3443 -Station D
Ottawa ON K1P 6P4

Dr. Lynn Gillespie
Research Scientist
CanadianMuseumof Nature
P.O. Box 3443 -Station D
OttawaON K1P 6P4

 

Environment
Canada
(Canadian
Wildlife Service)

Dr. B. Theresa Fowler
Science Advisor /Species Assessment Biologist
Species at Risk Branch
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
Ottawa ON K1A 0H3

 

Diane Amirault
Senior Species at Risk Biologist
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
P.O. Box6227
SackvilleNB E4L 1G6

 

Department of
Fisheries and
Oceans

Dr. Jake Rice
Director
Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat
Department of Fisheries and Oceans
200 Kent Street - Station 12S032
Ottawa ON K1A 0E6

 

Lara Cooper*
Canadian Science Advisory
Secretariat
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
200 Kent Street Station 12S032
Ottawa ON K1A 0E6

 

   
Parks CanadaDr. Gilles Seutin
Coordinator
Species at Risk Program
Parks Canada
25 Eddy Street, 4th Floor
GatineauQC K1A 0M5
Dr. Peter L. Achuff
National Botanist
Ecological Integrity Branch
Parks Canada
WatertonLakes National Park
Waterton Park AB T0K 2M 

 



*New/renewed Co-chairs on COSEWIC as of January 2005

Table 2/ Tableau 2: Co-chairs of the Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge Subcommittee and Species Specialist Subcommittees, with dates of appointment and the ending date of their terms of office.
SUBCOMMITEE   NAME   DATE
APPOINTED   
TERM
ENDING
Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge   Henry Lickers
Mohawk Council of Akwesasne
Department of the Environment
P.O. Box 579
Cornwall ON K6H 5T3
05/062003   31/12/2006
 Larry Carpenter
Wildlife Management Advisory Council
- Northwest Territories
P.O. Box 2120
Inuvik NT X0E 0T0
05/06/2003   31/12/2007
Amphibians and Reptiles   Dr. Ronald J. Brooks
Department of Zoology
College of Biological Science
University of Guelph
Guelph ON N1G 2W1
05/06/2003   31/12/2006
Dr. David M. Green*
Redpath Museum
McGill University
859 Sherbrooke Street West
Montréal QC H3A 2K6
05/06/2003   31/12/2008
Birds Richard Cannings*
1330 East Debeck Road
R.R. 1, Site 11 - Comp. 96
Naramata BC V0H 1N0
05/06/200331/12/2008
 Dr. Marty L. Leonard
Department of Biology
Dalhousie University
1355 Oxford Street
Halifax NS B3H 4J1
05/06/2003 31/12/2006
Freshwater Fishes Dr. Robert Campbell
983 Route 800 E
R.R. #1
St. Albert ON K0A 3C0
05-06/2003   31/12/2005
 Dr. Claude Renaud
Adjunct Professor, University of Ottawa
Research Scientist - Icthyology
Canadian Museum of Nature
P.O. Box 3443 - Station D
Ottawa ON K1P 6P4
 05/06/2003 31/12/2007
Arthropods   Dr. B. Theresa Fowler*
Science Advisor / Species Assessment Biologist
Species at Risk Branch
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
Ottawa ON K1A 0H3
  05/06/200331/12/2006
Dr Paul M. Catling*
Research Scientist and Curator
Biodiversity, National Program on Environmental Health
Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, Research
Branch Wm. Saunders Bldg., Central Experimental Farm

Ottawa, ON K1A 0C6   
01/01/2005   31/12/2008
MolluscsDr. Gerald L. Mackie
Department of Zoology
College of Biological Science
University of Guelph
Guelph ON N1G 2W1
05/06/200331/12/2006
 Janice L. Smith*
Aquatic Ecosystem Impacts Research Branch
National Water Research Institute
Environment Canada
Burlington ON L7R 4A6   
01/01/2005      31/12/2008
Marine Fishes
(Atlantic Ocean and Eastern Arctic)   
Dr. Richard L. Haedrich
Research Professor
Department of Biology
Memorial University of Newfoundland
4 Clark Place
St. John's NL A1B 5S7
05/06/2003 31/12/2007
Marine Fishes
(Pacific Ocean and Western Arctic)   
Dr. Mart R. Gross
Professor
Department of Zoology
University of Toronto
25 Harbord Street
Toronto ON M5S 3G5
05/06/200331/12/2005
Marine Mammals   Dr. Andrew Trites
Director
Marine Mammal Research Unit
Fisheries Centre
University of British Columbia
2204 Main Mall
Vancouver BC V6T 1Z4
05/06/2003   31/12/2007
 Dr. Hal Whitehead
Department of Biology
Dalhousie University
Halifax NS B3H 4J1
05/06/2003   31/12/2004
 Dr. Randall R. Reeves *
Okapi Wildlife Associates
Hudson QC J0P 1H0   
   01/01/2005   31/12/2008
Plants and Lichens
(Vascular Plants)   
Dr. Erich Haber
c/o National Botanical Services
604 Wavell Avenue
Ottawa ON K2A 3A8
   05/06/2003   31/12/2005
Plants and Lichens
(Mosses and Lichens)   
Dr. René Belland
Devonian Botanic Garden
University of Alberta
Edmonton AB T6G 2E1
05/06/2003   31/12/2007
Terrestrial Mammals   Dr. Marco Festa-Bianchet
Department of Biology
Sherbrooke University
Sherbrooke, QC J1K 2R1   
05/06/2003   31/12/2007
   Dr. M. Brock Fenton
Department of Biology
University of Western Ontario
London ON N6A 5B7
05/06/2003   31/12/2005

   


*New/renewed Non-government members on COSEWIC as of January 2005

Table 3/ Tableau 3: Three (3) Non-government COSEWIC members with dates of appointment and the ending date of their terms of office.
NAME DATE APPOINTED   TERM ENDING
Michael Bradstreet
Ontario Region Director
Nature Conservancy of Canada
RR 5, 5420 Highway 6 North
Guelph ON N1H 6J2
05/06/2003   31/12/2007

Dr. Steven M. Carr
Department of Biology
Memorial University of Newfoundland
Elizabeth Avenue
St. John's NL A1B 3X9
05/06/2003   31/12/2006
Dr. Jeffrey Hutchings *
Department of Biology
Dalhousie University
1355 Oxford Street
Edsell Castle Circle
Halifax NS B3H 4J1
05/06/2003   31/12/2008

Return to Table of Contents

Appendix III

 

BIOSKETCHES

 

Non-government Member

1. Recommendation - Dr. Jeffrey Hutchings (renewal)


Dr. Hutchings received a Ph. D. from Memorial University in 1991 and conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Edinburgh and at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans in St. John's. He became a faculty member at Dalhousie University in 1995 and is currently a full Professor. Dr. Hutchings has compiled an impressive record of research focussing on the conservation of marine fishes and the ecology of gadid and salmonid fishes. Dr. Hutchings has published over 80 publications in the peer-reviewed literature including sentinel publications on exploited marine species, and is well known for communicating this science to Canadian Society. Dr. Hutchings also authored the 2003 COSEWIC status report on Atlantic Cod.

Dr. Hutchings has considerable knowledge and experience with respect to the biology and management of Canadian marine, anadromous and freshwater fishes. He is most knowledgeable regarding Atlantic Canadian marine and freshwater environments and freshwater environments in Ontario. Dr. Hutchings has been a member of the COSEWIC Marine Fishes SSC since 1997 and has been a Non-government Member of COSEWIC since 2001. This has given him a strong foundation in species assessment and in formulating recommendations with respect to biological status. Dr. Hutchings has also published several peer-reviewed papers addressing the application of the IUCN criteria which have been adopted by COSEWIC.

Dr. Hutchings has broad experience as an editor for scientific journals and also has a proven record of working well collaboratively as a member of various panels and advisory committees in addition to his work on COSEWIC. He has successfully supervised eight graduate students and is currently supervising seven graduate students at the Ph. D. and M. Sc. level.

Co-chair

Amphibians & Reptiles Specialist Subcommittee

2. Recommendation - Dr. David M. Green (renewal)

 

Dr. David M. Green received his Ph.D. in Zoology from the University of Guelph in 1982. He is an Associate Professor at McGill University and Curator of Terrestrial Vertebrates at the Redpath Museum with over 90 peer-reviewed publications on amphibians. He has supervised or is currently supervising 13 graduate students doing projects on amphibians and reptiles (5 M.Sc., 3 Ph.D. graduated; 3 M.Sc., 2 Ph.D. ongoing). He is past Chair of COSEWIC (1998-2002), a Co-chair of the Amphibians and Reptiles Subcommittee since 1995 and a member of the Amphibians and Reptiles Subcommittee since 1985.

 

Co-chair

Arthropods Specialist Subcommittee

3. Recommendation - Dr. B. Theresa Fowler (renewal)

 

Dr. B. Theresa Fowler:
Current Position, Degrees and Biological Science Background since 1995, Scientific Authority, Endangered Species, Species at Risk Branch,
Canadian Wildlife Service
PhD, Ottawa, on behavioural ecology of Tamias striatus
3 years experience, behavioural ecology of marsh birds (Rallus limicola, Porzana carolina,
Exobrychus exilis)
5 years experience arctic ecosystems ( Lagopus mutus, Lepus arcticus)
56 papers and publications including government documents and presentations to legislators, popular conservation and nature literature, 2 journal articles and 2 book chapters

Other relevant experience (conservation biology, taxonomy, ecology, genetics, population biology etc)
8 years as Director of Canadian Nature Federation
broad interest in all taxa

Geographic Areas/Taxa
small mammals and birds, Quebec, Ontario and High Arctic
broad knowledge of flora and fauna of North America

Determining Biological Status of Species
17 years as a member of COSEWIC   
initiated and assembelled the molluscs and Lepidoptera Subcommittee for COSEWIC
since 2003, Co-Chair Arthropoda Species Specialist Group

Knowledge of Concepts and Techniques Related to Assessment and Conservation of Species at Risk
works daily with issues regarding Species at Risk

Editorial Roles, Manuscripts, Journals
periodic role as reviewer for journal articles
review of 4 natural history book manuscripts and 11 post publication book reviews
accomplished reviewer and editor of COSEWIC status reports for Lepidoptera and Mollusca
edits many documents in daily work
Other
knows English, French, and Polish with experience as a translator of scientific texts

Co-chair

Arthropods Specialist Subcommittee

4. Recommendation - Dr. Paul M. Catling (new)

Dr. Paul M. Catling:
Current Position, Degrees and Biological Science Background
since 1991, classified as Research Scientist, Level 3, Biological Resources Division of Agriculture Canada, 24 years experience with the Biosystematics Research Center/Biological Resources as a plant systematist, ecologist and curator of plant collections;
PhD, Toronto, on systematics and ecology of plants
14 years on the faculty of University of Ottawa
about 50 publications on odonates and lepidoptera , including books, book chapters, refereed journal articles and government documents, and over 300 botany publications

Other relevant experience (conservation biology, taxonomy, ecology, genetics, population biology etc)
7 years experience gathering data on the distribution of dragonflies in Canada including extensive Ontario work and some in NWT
serves on many advisory committees ( Canadian Expert Committee on Plant Genetic Resources, Species Survival Commission, Nature Conservancy)

Geographic Areas/ Taxa
odonates of Canada, most provinces, especially Ontario and NWT
lepidoptera of Ontario
expert knowledge of flora of Canada
publications in ornithology (10), mycology(1), herpetology(6)

Determining Biological Status of Species
prepared status reports on some Ontario lepidoptera and a COSEWIC status report on the goldenseal
participated in status ranking of plants and insects in Ontario and odonates in NWT

Knowledge of Concepts and Techniques Related to Assessment and Conservation of SAR
has wide experience in studying rare flora and fauna and rare habitats such as alvars and grasslands; has identified streams where rare odonates are found for possible protection measures
involved in 4 recovery teams including the team for the butterfly, bog elfin and the goldenseal; prepared monitoring plans, and publicizes recovery team approaches

Editorial Roles, Manuscripts, Journals,
assesses over 100 manuscripts, grant applications and theses per annum
associate editor of Canadian Field Naturalist, and the journal "Biodiversity"
currently editing conference proceedings


Co-chair

Birds Specialist Subcommittee

5. Recommendation - Richard Cannings (renewal)



Richard Cannings:

M.Sc. (1977) from Memorial University of Newfoundland -- breeding ecology of Horned Larks

B.Sc. (1975) from the University of B.C. -- homing behaviour in deer mice and Townsend's voles

Extensive (provincial, national and international) education and work experience (25 years) covering many aspects of conservation biology, systematics, population biology and genetics, and wildlife management

Curator of the Cowan Vertebrate Museum in the Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia (1980 to 1995) -- considerable experience in systematics and taxonomy of all terrestrial vertebrate groups-birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians

Consulting biologist in conservation biology, particularly regarding the flora and fauna of British Columbia

Completed (1996) a comprehensive treatment of all BC avian taxa called Birds of British Columbia: A Taxonomic Catalogue

Chair and report author of the South Okanagan Ecosystem Recovery Team (Habitat Atlas for Wildlife at Risk-South Okanagan & Lower Similkamee) -included habitat assessments, habitat mapping and GIS work, reintroduction of extirpated species, estimating minimum viable populations and minimum habitat requirements, working with local community groups and First Nations and implementing outreach and stewardship programs

Current research interests include the breeding biology of small owls, but I have a broad expertise in owl biology and have published a review of owl biology in the Handbook of Birds of the World (volume 5)

Good knowledge of the odonate (dragonfly) fauna of western Canada, and to a lesser extent, other insect groups (butterflies, true bugs)

Familiar with the flora of British Columbia, the Yukon and Newfoundland

Author of 8 COSEWIC status reports (including three updates) on five bird species and one amphibian

Author of reports on the provincial status of eight bird species in British Columbia., as well as Identified Wildlife reports (status and management recommendations) for three birds, seven butterflies and two dragonflies in British Columbia

Co-chair of the Birds Species Specialist Committee of COSEWIC (2001 to present). Member of RENEW recovery teams for White-headed Woodpecker, Sage Thrasher, Yellow-breasted Chat and Western Screech-Owl

Regular reviewer of articles and books for scientific journals, including the Auk, Condor and the Journal of Raptor Research

 

Co-chair

Marine Mammals Specialist Subcommittee

6. Recommendation - Dr. Randall R. Reeves (new)



Dr. Randall R. Reeves:
B.A. - University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska, USA
M.P.A. - Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, USA
Ph.D. - McGill University, Montreal

Dr. Reeves has been a self-employed researcher and writer since 1976, during which time he has compiled an impressive record of quality scientific work and of leadership in the conservation of marine mammals. Dr. Reeves has served on a number of national and international committees, most notably the Cetacean Specialist Group of the World Conservation Union or IUCN (of which he has been chair since 1997), as well as the various incarnations of the COSEWIC subcommittee devoted to marine mammals (1990 to present). He is the author or co-author of over 200 scientific or popular articles on marine mammals and is co-author or co-editor of several books and special issues of scientific journals. His writings include both technical and general treatment of the ecology of marine mammals, reviews of human impact on marine mammal populations (e.g. historic catches, live- capture and trade, offshore drilling), technical guides, workshop summaries, species status reports and conservation/management plans and guidelines. Dr. Reeves has conducted fieldwork at sites that span continents, including the Eastern Canadian Arctic and the North Atlantic, and is therefore well placed to address the status of Atlantic or Arctic species, as specified in our call for applicants. In short, Dr. Reeves has an impressive track record across the range of targeted skills, from strong science, to collaboration, to production of quality reports, and would therefore be an excellent choice as Co-Chair of the Marine Mammal Species Specialist Subcommittee.

 

Co-chair

Molluscs Specialist Subcommittee

7. Recommendation - Janice L. Smith (new)

 

Janice L. Smith:
Research Biologist,    Cumulative Impacts on Aquatic Biodiversity Project, Aquatic Ecosystem Impacts Research Branch, National Water Research Institute, Environment Canada, Burlington, Ontario
B.Sc. (First Class Honours) in Zoology, University of Manitoba, 1973.
M.Sc. equivalency, University of Waterloo, 1990

She is an excellent researcher with wide publishing and editing experience, is a known team player in the conservation area (recovery teams, Mollusc and Lepidoptera SSC for many years, co-led part of the General Status assessment of mollusks), and is a recognized authority on an important group of Canadian critters (Ontario mollusks). She has been instrumental in bringing the conservation problems of this otherwise rather obscure group into the mainstream and in getting them recognized as an indicator species for freshwater conservation problems generally.

NOTE: Curricula vitae for all nominees and current members are on file with the COSEWIC Secretariat.

19 March, 2004

Return to Table of Contents

Appendix IV

19 March, 2004

 

Terms of Reference

COSEWIC

Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge Subcommittee

(draft)


COSEWIC uses the best available scientific, Aboriginal traditional and community knowledge to assess species at risk. The Species at Risk Act (Section 18(1)) requires that COSEWIC establish an Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge subcommittee.

Purpose

The Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge Subcommittee (the ATK Subcommittee) facilitates access to the best available Aboriginal traditional knowledge and the incorporation of that knowledge into the COSEWIC species status assessment and classification processes.

Guiding Principles

The ATK Subcommittee is guided in carrying out its functions by the following principles. Subject to the terms of self-government and land claims agreements, Aboriginal communities are presumed to be the primary bodies to facilitate access to Aboriginal traditional knowledge in the assessment and classification of species at risk. Access is subject to local laws, protocols and practices. Permission to use Aboriginal traditional knowledge in the assessment and classification of species at risk must be secured from the holders of such knowledge. Aboriginal traditional knowledge used in the assessment and classification of species at risk is to be treated as public knowledge only with the approval of the holders of such knowledge. It is to be organized and presented in a culturally-appropriate, timely and thorough manner, and - to the extent possible - in such a way as to be comprehensible by both Aboriginal and non-aboriginal persons.

Functions

The functions of the ATK Subcommittee are:

  • To facilitate access to the best available Aboriginal traditional knowledge and the incorporation of that knowledge in the assessment and classification of species at risk;
  • To facilitate and, where necessary, participate - through reliance upon local holders of Aboriginal traditional knowledge - in the gathering of Aboriginal traditional knowledge in the assessment and classification of species at risk;
  • To commission Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge Reviews, as needed, which collect and present Aboriginal traditional knowledge concerning eligible candidate species, and receive unsolicited Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge reviews;
  •  To work jointly with other COSEWIC subcommittees to:
  • develop a candidate list of species for potential assessment by COSEWIC,

  •  develop and maintain the COSEWIC species priority list;

  • commission Species Status Reports; and

  •  review unsolicited Status Reports

  • To facilitate the delivery of the best available Aboriginal traditional knowledge on the status of a species under consideration by COSEWIC to the commissioned writer(s) of a Species Status Report;
  • To review and advise on the adequacy of the Aboriginal traditional knowledge content of draft, interim and final Species Status Reports, and provide recommendations concerning the status assessments of particular species; and
  • To promote a wider understanding of the nature and the benefits of Aboriginal traditional knowledge concerning the assessment and classification of species at risk.


Structure

Members

The ATK Subcommittee is composed of Aboriginal people experienced in Aboriginal traditional knowledge. The subcommittee normally has at least nine members. All members are appointed by the Minister of the Environment on the basis of their experience concerning Aboriginal traditional knowledge after consultation with any Aboriginal organizations he or she considers appropriate. Each member is appointed during good behavior for a term of four years. A member may be re-appointed, and shall only be removed for cause.

The duties of Members are to:

  • perform their duties in an independent manner;
  • attend ATK Subcommittee meetings;
  • review draft and interim status reports and contribute to status assessment deliberations to the best of their knowledge and ability;
  • advise writers of status reports and ATK reviews of appropriate guidelines established for the gathering and recording of Aboriginal traditional knowledge, as well as known sources of information and appropriate contacts, suggest species for the priority list and for status reports, review drafts and interim reports, and provide regional expertise on the status of, and threats to species;
  • participate as members of ATK Review Teams, as necessary;
  • provide additional and specific expertise as required to support the work of the ATK Subcommittee; and
  • participate on other COSEWIC Subcommittees and working groups, as requested by the Chair of COSEWIC.

 

Co-Chairpersons

The members select, from among the membership, two ATK Subcommittee Co-Chairpersons. Initially, one Co-Chairperson serves a term of two years, and the other a term of four years. Thereafter, both Co-Chairpersons serve staggered four-year terms. A Co-Chairperson may be re-appointed, and shall only be removed by the members for cause, after consultation with COSEWIC.

One ATK Subcommittee Co-Chairperson sits as a member of COSEWIC. The other Co-Chairperson is the alternate ATK Subcommittee member of COSEWIC.

The duties of the Co-Chairs are to:

  • serve as spokespersons for the subcommittee to COSEWIC;
  • manage the affairs of the subcommittee, including the conducting of meetings;
  • participate as members of COSEWIC;
  • exercise their discretion in an independent manner; and
  • participate on the Co-chairs Subcommittee of COSEWIC.


Operation

 

Meetings

The ATK subcommittee develops it own operations and procedures, under the authority of COSEWIC.

The person chairing an ATK Subcommittee meeting ensures that the meeting proceeds in an orderly fashion, maintaining COSEWIC's fundamental principles of independence, transparency and integrity.

The ATK Subcommittee attempts to make all decisions on the basis of consensus. Where consensus is not achievable, decisions are decided by a vote. All members except the person chairing the meeting has one vote on all matters. This person votes only in order to break a tie.

The presence of two-thirds of the ATK Subcommittee constitutes a quorum at meetings of the ATK Subcommittee. However, a decision or status recommendation related to the assessment of a species ordinarily requires input of a member from the area providing the most significant habitat for the species, or - if no such member has been appointed - of a member of an Aboriginal People traditionally associated with the species.

At the discretion of the ATK Subcommittee Co-Chairs, observers may attend ATK Subcommittee meetings in whole or in part. Sensitive or personal information may be discussed in camera as requested by Subcommittee members.

Reporting

The ATK Subcommittee:

  • provides to COSEWIC copies of its Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge Reviews and unsolicited Aboriginal traditional knowledge reviews. At the request of the ATK subcommittee, COSEWIC provides these documents to relevant authorities, including NACOSAR and wildlife management boards.
  • reports to COSEWIC on the adequacy of the Aboriginal traditional knowledge content of draft, interim and final Species Status Reports.
  • provides COSEWIC with recommendations concerning the status assessments of species discussed in Species Status Reports.
  •    provides an Annual Report of its activities to COSEWIC, which COSEWIC will make available on request.
  • All formal reports, advice and decisions of the ATK Subcommittee are provided in writing.

ATK Review Teams

Where a species is identified by the ATK Subcommittee or by COSEWIC as requiring an assessment that includes the best available Aboriginal traditional knowledge, the ATK Subcommittee may establish an ATK Review Team to provide it with relevant advice. The ATK Review Team is composed of Aboriginal traditional knowledge holders with specific expertise concerning that species and a member from the ATK Subcommittee who is responsible for reporting to the ATK Subcommittee.

ATK Database and Reviews

The ATK Subcommittee commissions ATK reviews on species requiring an assessment, via COSEWIC's procedure for commissioning reports.

Subject to relevant privacy and intellectual property rights and Aboriginal protocols, the ATK Subcommittee maintains a database and audio and video library on Aboriginal traditional knowledge resulting from the ATK Reviews or other work of the Subcommittee.

Network of Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge-holders

The ATK Subcommittee will assemble a network of Aboriginal traditional knowledge-holders and related experts covering the various Ecozones in Canada. The ATK Subcommittee will rely upon those persons:

  • to participate as members of ATK Review Teams; or
  • to provide additional and specific expertise as required to support the work of the ATK Subcommittee.

Members of this network are selected by the ATK Subcommittee and are not members of COSEWIC. Their mandate and term are specified by the ATK Subcommittee.

Support

As outlined in the Terms of Reference of COSEWIC, the COSEWIC Secretariat provides necessary administrative and technical support to the ATK Subcommittee. The ATK Subcommittee directs to the COSEWIC Secretariat any request for a copy of a Committee report, recommendation or other non-confidential document.

Review and Amendment

These Terms of Reference may be reviewed and changed by the ATK Subcommittee and COSEWIC by agreement.




Return to Table of Contents

Appendix V

 

COSEWIC Assessment Process, Categories and Guidelines

Reviewed and approved by

COSEWIC

in

May 2004


Table 1. Determining eligibility of species for status assessment.


A) Taxonomic validity

COSEWIC would normally only consider species and subspecies or varieties that have been established as valid in published taxonomic works or in peer reviewed communications from taxonomic specialists. COSEWIC would not normally consider other designatable units unless they can be shown to be genetically distinct, separated by a major range disjunction, or biogeographically distinct (refer to Guidelines for Designatable Units Below the Species Level, Appendix F5). Justification for considering designatable units below the species level must be provided.

B)   Native species

COSEWIC would normally only consider native species. A native species is a wild species that occurs in Canada naturally, or that has expanded its range into Canada without human intervention from a region where it naturally occurred, has produced viable populations, and has persisted in Canada for at least 50 years.

C)   Regularity of occurrence

COSEWIC would normally only consider species which occur regularly in Canada, excluding vagrants.

D)   Requires habitat in Canada

COSEWIC considers species that are year-round residents in Canada. COSEWIC also considers a species which, although not a full time residents in Canada, meet the other eligibility criteria and require habitat in Canada for a key life history stage.

E) Special cases

Notwithstanding the above guidelines, a taxon may be considered eligible if there are clear conservation reasons for consideration (for example high risk of extinction). In particular, a species which does not meet the eligibility criteria but which is at risk in its primary range outside of Canada could be considered for designation.

Reasons for considering a special case must be presented and supporting information must be provided; this should normally be reviewed and agreed to by COSEWIC before a status report is prepared.

Table 2. COSEWIC quantitative criteria and guidelines for the status assessment of species.

 

COSEWIC's revised criteria to guide the status assessment of species. These were in use by COSEWIC by November 2001, and are based on the revised IUCN Red List categories[1] (IUCN 2001). An earlier version of the quantitative criteria was used by COSEWIC from October 1999 to May 2001. For definitions of terms marked in bold italics, see COSEWIC's Glossary of Definitions and Abbreviations (Appendix C).
 EndangeredThreatened
A. Declining Total Population     
Reduction in population size based on any of the following 4 options and specifying a-e as appropriate:
 ≥70%≥50%
(1) population size reduction that is observed, estimated, inferred, or suspected in the past 10 years or  3 generations, whichever is longer, where the causes of the reduction are clearly reversible AND understood AND ceased, based on (and specifying) one or more of a-e below.
 ≥50%≥30%
(2) population size reduction that is observed, estimated, inferred or suspected over the last 10 years or 3 generations, whichever is longer, where the reduction or its causes may not have ceased OR  may not be understood OR may not be reversible, based on (and specifying) one or more of  a-e below.
(3) population size reduction that is projected or suspected to be met within in the next 10 years or 3 generations, whichever is longer (up to a maximum of 100 years), based on (and specifying) one or more of b-e below.
(4) population size reduction that is observed, estimated, inferred, projected or suspected over any 10 year or 3 generation period, whichever is longer (up to a maximum of 100 years), where the time period includes both the past and the future, AND where the reduction or its causes may not have ceased OR may not be understood OR may not be reversible, based on (and specifying) one or more of a-e below.

 

a) direct observation   
b) an index of abundance appropriate for the taxon
c) a decline in area of occupancy, extent of occurrence and/or quality of habitat
d) actual or potential levels of exploitation
e) the effects of introduced taxa, hybridisation, pathogens, pollutants, competitors or parasites 

 

 EndangeredThreatened
B. Small Distribution, and Decline or Fluctuation   
1. Extent of occurrence    < 5,000 km< 20,000 km
or  
2. Area of occupancy   < 500 km< 2,000 km
For either of the above, specify at least two of a-c:
(a) either severely
fragmented or known to
exist at # locations    
≤5≤10
(b) continuing decline observed, inferred or projected in one or more of the following:
    i) extent of occurrence   
   ii) area of occupancy   
   iii) area, extent and/or quality of habitat   
   iv) number of locations or populations   
   v) number of mature individuals   
 
(c) extreme fluctuations in
one or more of the  following:   

> 1 order of magnitude   > 1 order of magnitude
    i) extent of occurrence   
   ii) area of occupancy   
   iii) number of locations or populations   
   iv) number of mature individuals   
 
C. Small Total Population Size and Decline    
Number of mature individuals  and 1 of the following 2:      < 2,500   < 10,000
(1) an estimated continuing
decline rate of at least
:   20% in 5 years or 2 generations (up to a maximum of 100 years in the future)   10% in 10 years or 3 generations (up to a maximum of 100 years in the future)
(2) continuing decline, observed, projected, or inferred, in numbers of mature individuals and at least one of the following (a-b):
(a) fragmentation--
population structure in
the form of one of the
following:    
(i) no population estimated to contain
>250 mature individuals   
(i) no population estimated to contain
>1,000 mature individuals

    (ii) at least 95 % of mature individuals in one population   (ii) all mature individuals are in one population
(b) extreme fluctuations in the number of mature individuals
D. Very Small Population or Restricted Distribution   
(1) # of mature individuals   < 250   < 1,000
Or  
(2) Applies only to threatened:Population with a very restricted area of occupancy (area of occupancy typically < 20 km²) or number of locations (typically 5 or fewer) such that it is prone to the effects of human activities or stochastic events within a very short time period in an uncertain future, and thus is capable of becoming highly endangered or even extinct in a very short time period.

E. Quantitative Analysis      
Indicating the probability of extinction in the wild to be
at least:   
20% in 20 years or 5 generations, whichever is longer (up to a maximum of 100 years)   10% in 100 years

 

Special Concern:

those species that are particularly sensitive to human activities or natural events but are not endangered or threatened species.

Species may be classified as being of Special Concern if:

(a)   the species has declined to a level of abundance at which its persistence is increasingly threatened by genetic, demographic or environmental stochasticity, but the decline is not sufficient to qualify the species as Threatened; or
(b)   the species is likely to become Threatened if factors suspected of negatively influencing the persistence of the species are neither reversed nor managed with demonstrable effectiveness; or
(c)   the species is near to qualifying, under any criterion, for Threatened status; or
(d)   the species qualifies for Threatened status but there is clear indication of rescue effect from extra-limital populations.

Examples of reasons why a species may qualify for "Special Concern":

  • A species that is particularly susceptible to a catastrophic event (e.g., a seabird population near an oil tanker route)
  • A species with very restricted habitat or food requirements for which a threat to that habitat or food supply has been identified (e.g., a bird that forages primarily in old-growth forest, a plant that grows primarily on undisturbed sand dunes, a fish that spawns primarily in estuaries, a snake that feeds primarily on a crayfish whose habitat is threatened by siltation
  • A recovering species no longer considered to be Threatened or Endangered but not yet clearly secure

Examples of reasons why a species may not qualify for "Special Concern":

  • A species existing at low density in the absence of recognized threat (e.g., a large predatory animal defending a large home range or territory)
  • A species existing at low density that does not qualify for Threatened status for which there is a clear indication of rescue effect

Guidelines for use of Extirpated
   
   A species may be assessed as extinct or extirpated from Canada if:

  • there exists no remaining habitat for the species and there have been no records of the species despite recent surveys, or
  • 50 years have passed since the last credible record of the species, despite surveys in the interim, or
  • there is sufficient information to document that no individuals of the species remain alive.

Guidelines for use of Data Deficient
   
   Data Deficient should be used for cases where the status report has fully investigated all best available information yet that information is insufficient to: a) satisfy any criteria or assign any status, or b) resolve the species' eligibility for assessment.
         
   Examples:

  • Records of occurrence are too infrequent or too widespread to make any conclusions about extent of occurrence, population size, threats, or trends.
  • Surveys to verify occurrences, when undertaken, have not been sufficiently intensive or extensive or have not been conducted at the appropriate time of the year or under suitable conditions to ensure the reliability of the conclusions drawn from the data gathered.
  • The species' occurrence in Canada cannot be confirmed or denied with assurance.

Data Deficient should not be used if: a) the choice between two status designations is difficult to resolve by COSEWIC, or b) the status report is inadequate and has not fully investigated all best available information (in which case the report should be rejected), or c) the information available is minimally sufficient to assign status but inadequate for recovery planning or other such use.

Table 3. Guidelines for modifying status assessment based on rescue effect.

Species whose geographic range extends beyond that of the COSEWIC unit being designated (e.g. across an international boundary or into another Population of National Significance within Canada) are first assessed at the regional level (i.e., the unit being designated) using the quantitative criteria in Table 2. The potential for "rescue" is then considered. The rescue effect is the immigration of gametes or individuals that have a high probability of reproducing successfully, such that extirpation or decline of a population, or some other Designatable Unit, can be mitigated. If the potential for rescue is high, the risk of extirpation may be reduced, and the status may be downgraded. COSEWIC addresses this by applying the following guidelines developed by IUCN for this purpose (Gardenfors et al. 1999 ).

Likelihood of propagule migration
Are there any conspecific populations outside the region within a distance from which propagules could reach the region? Are there any effective barriers preventing dispersal to and from neighbouring populations? Is the species capable of long-distance dispersal? Is it known to do so?If there are no conspecific populations in neighbouring regions or propagules are not able to disperse to the region, the regional population behaves as an endemic and the category should be left unchanged.
Evidence for the existence of local adaptations
Are there any known differences in local adaptation between regional and extra-regional populations, i.e. is it probable that individuals from extra-regional populations are adapted to survive within the region?If it is unlikely that individuals from extra-regional populations would be able to survive within the region, the category should be left unchanged.
Availability of suitable habitat
Are current conditions of habitats and/or other environmental (including climatological) requirements of the taxon in the region such that immigrating propagules are able to successfully establish themselves (i.e. are there inhabitable patches), or has the taxon disappeared from the region because conditions were not favourable?If there is not enough suitable habitat and current conservation measures are not leading to an improvement of the habitat within a foreseeable future, immigration from outside the region will not decrease extinction risk and the category should be left unchanged.
Status of extra-regional populations
How abundant is the taxon in neighbouring regions? Are the populations there stable, increasing or decreasing? Are there any important threats to those populations? Is it probable that they produce an appreciable amount of emigrants, and will continue to do so for the forseeable future?If the taxon is more or less common outside the region and there are no signs of population decline and the taxon is capable of dispersing to the region and there is (or soon will be) available habitat, downgrading the category is appropriate. If the taxon is currently decreasing in neighbouring regions the 'rescue effect' is less likely to occur, hence downgrading the category may not be appropriate.
Degree of dependence on extra-regional sources
Are extant regional populations self-sustaining (i.e. have they shown a positive reproductive rate over the years) or are they dependent on immigration for long-term survival (i.e. are the regional populations sinks)?      If there is evidence that a substantial number of propagules regularly reach the region and the population still has a poor survival, the regional population may be a sink. If so, and there are indications that the immigration will soon cease, upgrading the category may be appropriate.

 

Table 4: Policy for modifying status assessment based on quantitative criteria

COSEWIC, IUCN and other groups recognize the need for additional assessment tools. Specifically, there is a need to consider life history variation amongst species and other taxa. COSEWIC has developed the following guideline:

In addition to the quantitative guidelines, COSEWIC will base its assessment on the degree to which various life-history characteristics (e.g., age & size at maturity, dispersal strategy, longevity) affect extinction probability and the likelihood that the species is vulnerable to the Allee effects of density dependence.

All else being equal:

  • species with delayed age at maturity tend to be at greater risk of extinction than species with early age at maturity
  • for indeterminately growing organisms (species that continue to grow after attaining maturity), larger species tend to be at greater risk of extinction than smaller species
  • species with low dispersal tend to be at greater risk of extinction than species with high dispersal
  • species with non-overlapping generations tend to be at greater risk of extinction than species with overlapping generations.

Table 5. COSEWIC status categories.

Extinct (X) A wildlife species that no longer exists.
Extirpated (XT) A wildlife species no longer existing in the wild in Canada, but occurring elsewhere.
Endangered (E) A wildlife species facing imminent extirpation or extinction.
Threatened (T) A wildlife species likely to become endangered if limiting factors are not reversed.
Special Concern (SC) A wildlife species that may become a threatened or an endangered species because of a combination of biological characteristics and identified threats.
Data Deficient (DD) A wildlife species for which there is inadequate information to make a direct, or indirect, assessment of its risk of extinction.
Not At Risk (NAR) A wildlife species that has been evaluated and found to be not at risk of extinction given the current circumstances.



[1] IUCN 2001. IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria: Version 3.1. Prepared by the IUCN Species

Survival Commission. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK.

Return to Table of Contents

Appendix VI

 

COSEWIC

Applications for Species Assessment

and Unsolicited Species Status Reports

May 2004

All of COSEWIC's actions are directed towards assessing the biological status of native wild species suspected of being at risk of extinction or extirpation across their range in Canada. COSEWIC uses the best available information relevant to assessing a species' risk of extinction or extirpation, which it may obtain from credible sources of knowledge of the species and its habitat. The evaluation process is independent and transparent, and the results are reported to the Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council (CESCC) and the Canadian public. COSEWIC is established under Section 14(1) of the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) and its assessments form the foundation for the legal List of Species at Risk under that legislation. Sections 21, 22 and 28 of SARA direct that COSEWIC will consider applications for the assessment of species and species status reports accompanied by applications for the assessment of species, subject to regulations. Any such application constitutes a request for assessment.

COSEWIC maintains and continually updates a Candidate List of species for commissioning Status Reports. Before preparing a request for assessment, potential applicants are asked to contact, via the COSEWIC Secretariat, the appropriate COSEWIC Species Specialist Subcommittee (SSC) or, in the case of a species not covered by any of COSEWIC's nine SSC's, the Chair of COSEWIC. Potential applicants will be advised concerning the estimation of threats to the species in question, the imminence of the threats, the species' current standing on COSEWIC's Candidate List for assessment, valuable sources of information, and other advice concerning the preparation of a request for assessment and/or status report.

 

Requests for Assessment

Scope of Applications

Applications to COSEWIC may consist either of:

  • a request to COSEWIC to consider a particular species for assessment, or;
  • a request to COSEWIC to consider a particular species for assessment accompanied by Species Status Report that has not been solicited by COSEWIC.

COSEWIC's approach to assigning status is, first, to examine a species as a whole. Only if deemed appropriate in cases where a single status designation for a species is not sufficient to accurately portray probabilities of extinction within the species will COSEWIC examine the status of entities below the level of species, be they subspecies, varieties, or geographically or genetically distinct populations (i.e. Designatable Units).

  • Requests for Assessment - A Request for Assessment application may propose an eligible species or Designatable Unit for assessment. A request for assessment of a subspecies, variety, or geographically or genetically distinct population must contain a clear explanation of the validity of the Designatable Unit(s).
  • Species Status Reports - Unless specifically requested by COSEWIC, a Species Status Report must consider the whole of a species' occurrence within Canada. Should a Species Status Report propose separate status designations for putative Designatable Units within the species in question, the report must contain clear explanations of the validity of the Designatable Units.

Species' Eligibility

To be eligible for assessment, a species must meet certain criteria regarding taxonomic validity, native origin, regularity of occurrence, and dependence on Canadian habitat. COSEWIC normally only considers species and subspecies or varieties that have been established as taxonomically valid. They must be native to Canada, occur regularly in Canada (thus excluding vagrants), and require habitat in Canada for at least one key life history stage. Any case that is an exception to these rules must be justified with supporting information; this should normally be reviewed and agreed to by COSEWIC before a status report is prepared. Ineligible species (for example domestic, feral, or artificially introduced species of animals and plants, or bacteria and viruses which are specifically excluded by SARA) cannot be assessed by COSEWIC.

Imminence of Threat

Species for which the threat of extinction or extirpation is extreme (e.g., greater than 50% probability of loss within 10 years) and for which immediate action is required if the species is to survive may be subject to emergency assessment. If an emergency assessment is requested, a full justification for considering the threat to be extreme must be provided. A status report is not required to accompany a request for an emergency assessment but is recommended. Applicants who wish to request an emergency assessment are strongly urged to contact COSEWIC and the appropriate SSC Co-Chair beforehand to determine if the emergency assessment is warranted.

Justification for the Request and Sources of Information

An explication of why the species might be considered to be at risk is required. This should indicate the nature of the particular threats to the species, population and distribution trends of the species, evidence of decline, and other estimations of its status in Canada including General Status of Species in Canada rankings and provincial or territorial rankings, or other systems. If there is more information than can be contained in three pages of text, a species status report should be prepared. Sources for the information contained in the justification for the request, be they published literature, unpublished reports, personal observations, or the observations of others, must be listed.

Conflict of Interest

Applicants for Species Status Assessment and suppliers of Species Status Reports for COSEWIC must declare any conflicts of interest pertaining to the application for assessment and its possible outcome (Annex I). Failure to do so may cause applications and reports to be returned unreceived by COSEWIC.

Species Status Reports

A Species Status Report for COSEWIC is a comprehensive, fully documented technical compilation and analysis of the best available information on a species' status in Canada that indicates the threats to that species. A Species Status Report for COSEWIC must conform to the guidelines for preparation of Status Reports.

Waiver of Moral Rights and Permission to use Species Status Report

Authors and owners of Species Status Reports must grant permission to COSEWIC and to Environment Canada to use, edit, reformat, reproduce, modify, distribute, and share the Species Status Report and any subsequent revisions to that Report by the author. Authors furthermore must provide Environment Canada with a waiver of their moral rights to the Species Status Report. A separate waiver is required from each contributing author. The permission to use the Species Status Report and the waiver of moral rights enable COSEWIC and Environment Canada to treat the final COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report as a living document subject to periodic updates as may be required without having to specifically name the author of the original Species Status Report.

Accordingly, legal owners of a Species Status Report must sign a copy of Annex II (Permission To Use Species Status Report) and each author of a report must sign a copy of Annex III (Waiver of Moral Rights) . Failure to include signed copies of Annexes II and III with a Species Status Report that accompanies an Application for Assessment may cause the report to be returned unreceived by COSEWIC.

Employees of the Government of Canada who prepare Species Status Reports are not required to tender the permission in Annex II as the report is automatically the property of the Crown. Employees of a province or territory who prepare Species Status Reports may or may not be required to provide Annex II and should contact the COSEWIC Secretariat (cosewic/cosepac@ec.gc.ca). Author(s) who are government employees are, however, still required to sign the waiver in Annex III.

Completeness of Applications

An Application for Assessment that is incomplete cannot be considered by COSEWIC and will be returned. An application must contain:

  • A completed application form "Request for Assessment", signed and dated, that includes a justification for why the species may be at risk of extinction
  • Annex I (Conflict of Interest), completed and signed separately by all applicants

If the Application also includes a Species Status Report, it must also include:

  • A Copy of Annex II (Permission To Use Species Status Report), signed by all copyright owners (ordinarily the authors) with regards to the Status Report
  • Copies of Annex III (Waiver of Moral Rights) signed by each of the authors of the Status Report

An Application for Assessment that is complete but is accompanied by a Species Status Report that is not acceptable may be considered by COSEWIC only on its merits as a request for assessment of a particular species.

Submission of Applications

Applications for Assessment should be mailed to:

COSEWIC Secretariat
c/o Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H3
attn: the appropriate Species Specialist Subcommittee or the Chair of COSEWIC
(courier address: Vincent Massey Bldg., 4th floor - 351 St. Joseph blvd, Gatineau, Quebec, J8Y 3Z5) 

Process

Applications for Assessment, including Applications that are accompanied by an unsolicited Species Status Report, will initially be considered by the appropriate SSC or, in the case of a species not covered by one of COSEWIC's nine SSCs, an ad hoc subcommittee struck by the Chair of COSEWIC.

An Application for Assessment that is not accompanied by a Species Status Report may be forwarded to COSEWIC by the SSC or ad hoc subcommittee with a recommendation and may be received by COSEWIC for consideration at a Species Assessment Meeting. If accepted, the application will be referred to the COSEWIC Co-chairs subcommittee for placement on the COSEWIC Candidate List and assigned a priority level for commissioning a Status Report.

A Species Status Report that accompanies an Application for Assessment is first evaluated by the appropriate SSC or ad hoc subcommittee. A Status Report that is complete and in conformity to the guidelines for completion of Status Reports, as judged by the SSC or ad hoc subcommittee, will be subjected to review in compliance with normal COSEWIC procedure for all status reports. A valid Status Report will be forwarded to the relevant jurisdictions (including, as necessary, any relevant Wildlife Management Boards) and the COSEWIC ATK Subcommittee. Jurisdictions are allowed 6 months to review all reports prior to a COSEWIC Species Assessment Meeting. The report will be distributed to all members of COSEWIC two months prior to a Species Assessment Meeting accompanied by a copy of the Application, a Technical Summary prepared by the SSC or ad hoc subcommittee, and a recommendation from the SSC or ad hoc subcommittee. Throughout this review process, the author(s) of a Species Status Report may be asked to make editorial changes, add available information, and/or delete inapplicable sections of the report. Failure to comply with such requests may result in a report being deemed unacceptable.

The application and report will only be received for consideration by COSEWIC at a Species Assessment Meeting.

An Application for Assessment that is complete but is accompanied by an unsolicited Species Status Report that is incomplete or not in conformity to the guidelines for completion of status reports as judged by the SSC or ad hoc subcommittee, or is unaccompanied by a waiver of moral rights and a grant of permission to use the Species Status Report may be considered by COSEWIC as though only a Request for Assessment without a status report. In this case, the Species Status Report will be returned unreceived by COSEWIC. The Applicant will have the option either to proceed with the Request for Assessment without the Status Report or withdraw the Application in order to revise the report.

An Application for Assessment that requests an emergency assessment will be consigned to an ad hoc Emergency Assessment Subcommittee consisting of the Chair of COSEWIC, the appropriate Subcommittee Co-chair(s), and the relevant jurisdictional member(s) of COSEWIC. The Emergency Assessment Subcommittee will consider the imminence of the threats to the species and whether a status listing on an emergency basis is warranted. If the emergency listing is warranted, the Emergency Assessment Subcommittee will forward its recommendation to the federal Minister of Environment and advise COSEWIC. If the emergency listing is not warranted, the Application will be considered in the same manner as a regular request for assessment.

Outcomes

An Application for Assessment that is not accompanied by a Species Status Report or is accompanied by an unacceptable Species Status Report will either:

  • be accepted by COSEWIC and result in the species in question being placed on the Candidate List and assigned a priority level for commissioning a Species Status Report. Priority level will be determined by COSEWIC on advice from the appropriate SSC or ad hoc subcommittee, or;
  • be accepted by COSEWIC and result in the species in question being assigned a new level of priority for commissioning a species status report, or;
  • be rejected by COSEWIC.

An unsolicited Species Status Report that accompanies an Application for Assessment will either:

  • be accepted by COSEWIC and result in the species in question being assessed by COSEWIC at a Species Assessment Meeting, or;
  • be rejected by COSEWIC.

An Application for Assessment that requests an emergency assessment may either:

  • be accepted by the ad hoc Emergency Assessment Subcommittee and forwarded to the Minister of Environment with a recommendation, or;
  • be rejected by the ad hoc Emergency Assessment Subcommittee and considered in the same terms as an other request for assessment.

Applicants will be informed by COSEWIC of its decisions. For all rejected Applications and Status Reports, COSEWIC will indicate to the applicant the reason(s) for rejection. In these matters, COSEWIC's decision is final for any particular Application.

Additional Information on the COSEWIC Website (http://www.cosewic.gc.ca/index.htm):

Attachments:

Application Form "Request for Assessment" (Required for all applications)

Annex I: Declaration of Conflict of Interest (Required for all applications)

Annex II: Permission To Use Species Status Report (To accompany status reports only)

Annex III: Waiver of Moral Rights (To accompany status reports only)

 

Request for Species Assessment


Date of Application:_______________
Name(s) of applicant(s):
Address:
telephone, fax, email:

Status report: attached ∗ not attached ∗


Species (Scientific name, English and French common names):   

_____________________________________________________
                     
Species' Distribution
   Globally:

   In Canada:


Imminence of Threat:    extreme ∗    very high ∗    high ∗   moderate ∗    not known ∗ not applicable ∗

Is the threat of extinction or extirpation from Canada sufficiently grave as to warrant an emergency assessment ∗ yes ∗ no ?

Justification for Request for Assessment (maximum 3 pages)
(i.e. evidence of decline, threats to the species, other reasons to suspect the species is at risk of extinction or extirpation from Canada)

Sources of Information:

The applicant(s) attest that the information in this request for assessment is, to the greatest extent possible, accurate and true. Furthermore, if a Species Status Report is attached, the author(s) agree(s) that the status report may be reviewed and edited by COSEWIC and the corresponding Subcommittee Co-Chair, that the author(s) will receive no royalty or other compensation from the Government of Canada or from COSEWIC, and that the manuscript contains no matter that is libellous, invades individual privacy, or infringes upon any proprietary rights.

Signature(s): ________________________________________

 

 


Annex I

Declaration of Conflict of Interest

To accompany all applications


A separate copy of this form must be completed by each applicant.

Pursuant to the Request for Assessment of:

(species)____________________________________________________,

I, (name)________________________________, hereby declare any and all proprietary or commercial interest or conflicts of interest I may have that relate directly or indirectly to the subject of this application.

Details:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signature ___________________________

Date:_______________________________

 


Annex II

Permission To Use Species Status Report

To accompany submission of a status report

 

I/We _____________________________________________________ as legal owner(s) name(s)

of the intellectual property in the Species Status Report entitled

(Update) Status report on the ____________________________________ in Canada
                                                                    name of species

hereby grant permission to COSEWIC and to Environment Canada (EC) to use, edit, reformat, reproduce, modify, distribute, and share the Species Status Report, a copy of which is attached to this Permission, in whole or in part, in support of the COSEWIC species status assessment process.

I/we understand that EC will be using the Species Status Report to produce a COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report and future updates to this latter report. I/we also understand and agree the COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report and future updates shall be the intellectual property of EC and that I/we have no rights to them.

I am/we are submitting, with this Permission, waivers of Moral Rights from all authors who contributed to the Species Status Report.

Signature _____________________________

Name    ______________________________

Address _____________________________
______________________________
______________________________


Signature ______________________________

Name    ________________________________
Address ______________________________
______________________________
______________________________


Signature ______________________________

Name    ________________________________
Address ______________________________
______________________________
______________________________

Annex III

Waiver of Moral Rights

To accompany submission of a status report

A separate copy of this form must be completed by each author.

I _________________________________________________________ declare that I
name of author

have contributed to the creation or production of the Species Status Report entitled:

(Update) Status report on the ______________________________________ in Canada
                                                      name of species

(hereinafter referred to as the "Work") and briefly described as a report containing the best available information on the species status in Canada that will form the basis for a status assessment by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). I recognize that:

__________________________________________________________________
name(s) of copy right owner(s)

is/are the lawful owner(s) of the copyright in the Work.

I am are fully aware that my moral rights, as defined by the Copyright Act, include a) the right of having my name associated with the Work, where reasonable in the circumstances; and b) the right to the integrity of the Work such as preventing the Work from being changed, corrected or amended.

I hereby waive in whole all moral rights which I may have in the Work in favour of the Government of Canada (Environment Canada), including the right to the integrity of the Work, the right to be associated with the Work in all contexts and in connection with all products and/or services.

For purposes of this Waiver, "Work" shall include without limitation all multimedia presentations, software, documentation, data, designs, reports, flowcharts, specification and source code listings, and of any related works, including any enhancements, modifications, or additions to the software and hardware products owned, marketed, or used by the Government of Canada.

Signed, sealed and delivered in the presence of

______________________       ______________________
Witness (signature)                      Author (signature)

______________________       ______________________
Name of Witness (printed)                Name of Author (printed)

______________________
Date

Return to Table of Contents

Appendix VII

 

COSEWIC Status Assessments (November 2003 and May 2004).

Results are grouped by taxon and then by status category. A reason for designation is given for each species. A short history of status designations follows. The range of occurrence in Canada for each species (by province, territory or ocean) is provided.

 

Mammals

Beluga WhaleDelphinapterus leucasEndangered
Eastern Hudson Bay population 
Assessment Criteria   A2d; C1; E 
Reason for Designation  
The population was reduced by at least 50% and continues to decline. Overhunting continues throughout its summer and migratory range. Mathematical models predict that it will likely disappear under present hunting levels in less than 10 to 15 years. Concerns have been expressed about habitat degradation of estuaries by hydroelectric projects, and by small vessel traffic disturbance.
Occurrence   NU QC Arctic Ocean Atlantic Ocean 
Status History  
Designated Threatened in April 1988. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Beluga WhaleDelphinapterus leucasEndangered
Ungava Bay population 
Assessment Criteria   A2a; D1 
Reason for Designation  
All signs indicate that the population residing in Ungava Bay is very low and may be extirpated. However, it is difficult to definitively conclude that they have been extirpated because beluga from other populations may visit Ungava Bay. Hunting caused the population decline and continues in Ungava Bay, posing a threat to any remaining beluga.
Occurrence   QC Arctic Ocean Atlantic Ocean 
Status History  
Designated Endangered in April 1988. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Peary CaribouRangifer tarandus pearyiEndangered
Assessment Criteria   A2a 
Reason for Designation  
This caribou is a Canadian endemic subspecies. Numbers have declined by about 72% over the last three generations, mostly because of catastrophic die-off likely related to severe icing episodes. The ice covers the vegetation and caribou starve. Voluntary restrictions on hunting by local people are in place, but have not stopped population declines. Because of the continuing decline and expected changes in long-term weather patterns, this subspecies is at imminent risk of extinction.
Occurrence   NT NU  
Status History  
The original designation considered a single unit that included Peary Caribou, Rangifer tarandus pearyi, and what is now known as the Dolphin and Union population of the Barren-ground Caribou, Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus. It was assigned a status of Threatened in April 1979. Split to allow designation of three separate populations in 1991: Banks Island (Endangered), High Arctic (Endangered) and Low Arctic (Threatened) populations. In May 2004 all three population designations were de-activated, and the Peary Caribou, Rangifer tarandus pearyi, was assessed separately from the Barren-ground Caribou (Dolphin and Union population),  Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus. The subspecies pearyi is comprised of a portion of the former "Low Arctic population", and all of the former "High Arctic" and "Banks Island" populations, and it was designated Endangered in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Beluga WhaleDelphinapterus leucasThreatened
St. Lawrence Estuary population 
Assessment Criteria   D1 
Reason for Designation  
The population was severely reduced by hunting, which continued until 1979. High contaminant loads may have also contributed to the population decline. Aerial surveys since 1973 suggest that the decline has ceased, but do not provide clear evidence of a significant increase in numbers. Levels of many contaminants remain high in beluga tissues. The whales and their habitat are threatened by contaminants, vessel traffic, and industrialization of the St. Lawrence watershed.
Occurrence   QC Atlantic Ocean 
Status History  
Designated Endangered in April 1983. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1997. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Beluga WhaleDelphinapterus leucasThreatened
Cumberland Sound population 
Assessment Criteria   D1 
Reason for Designation  
Numbers of belugas using Cumberland Sound have declined by about 1500 individuals between the 1920s and present. The population decline is believed to have been caused by hunting by the Hudson Bay Company into the 1940s and by the Inuit until 1979. Hunting has been regulated since the 1980s. Current quotas (41 in 2003) appear to be sustainable. Concerns have been raised about increased small vessel traffic and the associated noise of outboard motors, as well as fishery removals of Greenland halibut, a food of belugas.
OccurrenceNU Arctic Ocean 
Status History  
The Southeast Baffin Island-Cumberland Sound population was designated Endangered in April 1990. In May 2004, the structure of the population was redefined and named "Cumberland Sound population", and the Southeast Baffin Island animals were included as part of the Western Hudson Bay population. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Plains BisonBison bison bisonThreatened
Assessment Criteria   D1+2 
Reason for Designation  
There are currently about 700 mature bison of this subspecies in three free-ranging herds and about 250 semi-captive mature bison in Elk Island National Park. The largest free-ranging herd, in the Pink Mountain area of BC, is outside the historical range of this subspecies. The population in Prince Albert National Park is increasing by about 10% a year. The greatest problem facing these bison in Canada is the lack of habitat, due to conversion to agriculture and urbanization. Additional threats include domestic cattle disease and the risk of genetic pollution from escaped ranched bison, including some that may carry cattle genes. The total number of free-ranging and semi-captive mature bison of this subspecies is just under 1000, and there are fewer than 5 populations.
Occurrence   BC AB SK MB 
Status History  
Designated Threatened in May 2004. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Barren-ground CaribouRangifer tarandus groenlandicusSpecial Concern
Dolphin and Union population 
Assessment Criteria   Not applicable 
Reason for Designation  
This population of caribou is endemic to Canada. Once thought to be extinct, numbers have recovered to perhaps a quarter of the population historic size. They have not been censused since 1997 and are subject to a high rate of harvest, whose sustainability is questioned by some. They migrate between the mainland and Victoria Island and climate warming or increased shipping may make the ice crossing more dangerous. The population, however, increased substantially over the last three generations and was estimated at about 28000 in 1997.
Occurrence NT NU 
Status History  
The original designation considered a single unit that included Peary Caribou, Rangifer tarandus pearyi, and what is now known as the Dolphin and Union population of the Barren-ground Caribou, Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus. It was assigned a status of Threatened in April 1979. Split to allow designation of three separate populations in 1991: Banks Island (Endangered), High Arctic (Endangered) and Low Arctic (Threatened) populations. In May 2004 all three population designations were de-activated, and the Peary Caribou, Rangifer tarandus pearyi, was assessed separately from the Barren-ground Caribou (Dolphin and Union population), Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus. The Dolphin and Union population is comprised of a portion of the former "Low Arctic population", and it was designated Special Concern in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Beluga WhaleDelphinapterus leucasSpecial Concern
   Western Hudson Bay population 
Assessment Criteria   Not applicable 
Reason for Designation  
The population appears to be relatively abundant, although it has not been surveyed for 15 years and may consist of more than one population. The population is subject to substantial removals by hunting in parts of its range, and is potentially threatened by shipping and hydroelectric dams.
Occurrence MB NU ON Arctic Ocean Atlantic Ocean
Status History  
Designated Not at Risk in April 1993. The population was redefined in May 2004 to include those Southeast Baffin Island animals outside Cumberland Sound, previously considered part of the "Southeast Baffin Island-Cumberland Sound population" which is now called "Cumberland Sound population". Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Beluga WhaleDelphinapterus leucasSpecial Concern
Eastern High Arctic - Baffin Bay population 
Assessment Criteria Not applicable 
Reason for Designation  
The population overwinters in Baffin Bay and west Greenland and may consist of two distinct populations. It is heavily hunted in west Greenland. However, most of the population winters in Baffin Bay and the high Arctic where it is not hunted. Hunting pressure in Canadian waters is low in summer.
Occurrence NU Arctic Ocean 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in April 1992. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Grey WhaleEschrichtius robustusSpecial Concern
Eastern North Pacific population 
   Assessment Criteria   Not applicable 
Reason for Designation  
Grey whales migrate each year from their winter calving grounds in Mexico to their summer feeding areas in northern Alaska, Russia and Canada. Most of the population passes along the BC coastline, and some individuals repeatedly spend the entire summer feeding in BC (about 80). The population increased by 2.5% per year following the cessation of whaling, and peaked, within the range of pre-exploitation estimates, at about 27,000 animals in 1998. The extent of recovery of the summer resident group is unknown. However, over one-third of the population died from 1998 to 2002 (possibly due to a lack of food in Alaska). Birth rates, survival rates and other indicators suggest that the decline has ceased and that the population is stable or increasing since 2002. The whales are susceptible to human activities in their 4 breeding lagoons in Mexico, as well as to entanglement in fishing gear and collisions with boats throughout their range. Underwater noise associated with proposed oil development in BC could alter migration patterns. The small group of summer-resident whales could also be threatened by subsistence whaling in the USA.
OccurrencePacific Ocean Arctic Ocean 
Status History  
Designated Not at Risk in April 1987. Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Harbour PorpoisePhocoena phocoenaSpecial Concern
   Pacific Ocean population 
Assessment Criteria   Not applicable 
Reason for Designation  
They appear to be particularly sensitive to human activities, and are prone to becoming entrapped and killed in fishing nets. They are a short lived shy species that are now rarely seen at the highly developed areas of Victoria and Haro Strait. Continued development and use of its prime habitat by humans are some of the main threats. They are displaced by underwater noise, and could be affected by contaminants in their food chain.
Occurrence Pacific Ocean 
Status History  
Species considered in April 1991 and placed in the Data Deficient category. Re-examined in November 2003 and designated Special Concern. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Spotted BatEuderma maculatumSpecial Concern
Assessment Criteria   The estimated Canadian population (< 1000 adults) met criterion for Threatened D1, but it was designated Special Concern because there is a possibility of rescue effect from neighbouring populations in the United States. Foraging and roosting habitats appear to be secure in Canada.
Reason for Designation  
In Canada, this species occurs in the intermontane grasslands and ponderosa pine woodlands of southern British Columbia. It is a distinctively coloured bat that is unmistakable to identify. Unlike any other Canadian species of bat, its echolocation calls are within the range of human hearing. It roosts in crevices in large cliff faces. It is considered the easiest to count and best censused species of bat in Canada. Population estimates, based on relatively good census effort, suggests that there are fewer than 1000 adults. At this time, numbers appear to be stable, and there are relatively few threats to populations or habitats. Perhaps the biggest threat to this species is its small population size. Use of pesticides on its insect prey, loss of foraging habitat, and disturbance at roosting sites by rock climbers are potential threats. Rescue may be possible from neighbouring populations in the United States, however, movements of individuals between Canadian and US populations are not documented.
Occurrence BC 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in April 1988. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
StellerSeaLionEumetopias jubatusSpecial Concern
Assessment Criteria   Met criteria for Threatened, D2, but was designated Special Concern because the population is increasing and there is a possible rescue effect.
Reason for Designation  
There are only three breeding locations in British Columbia. Although the population is increasing, they are sensitive to human disturbance while on land. Threats include the possibility of acute oil spills. There are unexplained declines in other populations to the north and west of British Columbia.
OccurrenceBC Pacific Ocean 
Status History  
Designated Not at Risk in April 1987. Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in November 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Beluga WhaleDelphinapterus leucasNot at Risk
   Eastern Beaufort Sea population 
Assessment Criteria   Not applicable 
Reason for Designation 
This population is currently large and hunted at sustainable levels under an international agreement.
OccurrenceNT Arctic Ocean 
Status History  
Designated Not at Risk in April 1985 and in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Fringed BatMyotis thysanodesData Deficient
Assessment Criteria   Not applicable 
Reason for Designation  
This species is rarely reported in its Canadian range. There are, however, a few sites in the Okanagan Valley where they regularly can be captured during the summer. There is a lack of data about the extent of its Canadian range and the habitat that is important for foraging and roosting. We also do not know the population size or trends, nor any key demographic characteristics, such as population structure, reproduction or survival rates. It is not known if this species overwinters in Canada or migrates south for the winter; however, there are maternity colonies recorded in Canada.
Occurrence BC 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in April 1988. Species considered in May 2004 and moved to the Data Deficient category. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Keen's Long-eared BatMyotis keeniiData Deficient
Assessment Criteria   Not applicable 
Reason for Designation  
The situation for this species is generally similar to that for any species of bats that occur in Canada. There are no data about populations sizes, populations trends, patterns of reproduction (it is not known if females bear young annually; age at sexual maturity is unknown), and there are only scattered records documenting occurrence and patterns of distribution. Furthermore, there is a lack of information about patterns of habitat use (roosting, foraging) or data about migration. Uncertainty about the taxonomic status of this species further complicates the matter. It is unknown if it is a distinct taxon. It is unknown if this is a distinct population.
Occurrence BC 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in April 1988. Species considered in November 2003 and moved to the Data Deficient category. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 

Birds

 
Horned Lark strigata subspeciesEremophila alpestris strigataEndangered
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)+2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v); D1
Reason for Designation  
Although this species has always been rare in Canada, it has declined steadily throughout its range over the last 50 years and is now nearly extirpated from Canada.
OccurrenceBC 
Status History  
Designated Endangered in November 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Northern BobwhiteColinus virginianusEndangered
Assessment Criteria   A2b; C1+2a(i) 
Reason for Designation  
This species depends on native prairie and old meadow habitats that have largely disappeared from its southern Ontario range. Its population has declined drastically over the last 30 years and shows no sign of significant recovery. There is perhaps only one viable population in Canada, on Walpole Island, Ontario. The status of this species is complicated by the presence of many introduced populations which typically do not persist and whose genetic composition may pose a threat to native populations.
OccurrenceON 
Status History  
Designated Endangered in April 1994. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Red Crossbill percna subspeciesLoxia curvirostra percnaEndangered
Assessment Criteria   C1 
Reason for Designation  
The percna subspecies of the red crossbill is considered a distinctive taxonomic group, with breeding likely restricted to the island of Newfoundland. Various population estimates suggest that it is has declined markedly and steadily over the last 50 years, along with declines in the extent and quality of its habitat. A few records of the percna subspecies exist for Nova Scotia and other locations, but there is not enough information to determine its status there.
OccurrenceNL 
Status History  
Designated Endangered in May 2004. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Loggerhead ShrikeLanius ludovicianus excubitoridesThreatened
excubitorides subspecies  
Assessment Criteria   A2bc 
Reason for Designation  
This raptorial songbird has suffered significant (more than 80 %) population declines over the past 35 years. These declines have been linked to loss of native prairie and pastureland habitats and pesticide residues.
Occurrence AB SK MB 
Status History  
The species was considered a single unit and designated Threatened in April 1986. Split according to subspecies in April 1991. The excubitorides subspecies retained the original Threatened designation from April 1986. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Pink-footed ShearwaterPuffinus creatopusThreatened
Assessment Criteria   D2 
Reason for Designation  
This seabird breeds on only three islands off the coast of Chile, where it has suffered significant but unmeasured declines due to nest predation by introduced predators, exploitation by humans and habitat degradation. It likely incurs mortality due to incidental take by fisheries off the coast of British Columbia during the non-breeding season and would be sensitive to any offshore oil spills there.
Occurrence BC 
Status History  
Designated Threatened in May 2004. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Short-tailed AlbatrossPhoebastria albatrusThreatened
Assessment Criteria   D1+2 
Reason for Designation  
This species was once an abundant seabird along the coast of British Columbia but its numbers declined to near extinction in early 20th Century. Numbers are now slowly increasing. Albatross populations in general are very sensitive to incidental catch by commercial fisheries and oil spills: while these impacts have not been documented for this species in Canadian waters, they pose a significant potential threat.
OccurrenceBC 
Status History  
Designated Threatened in November 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 

Reptiles

 
Prairie SkinkEumeces septentrionalisEndangered
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)+2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v) 
Reason for Designation  
This lizard is confined to a small region (less than 1700 km2) in Manitoba. It requires sandy soils and mixed grass prairie. Prairie habitat is being fragmented and lost to cultivation, Aspen succession and invasion by exotic leafy spurge. The Manitoba population is isolated from the rest of the species in the USA by over 100 km.
Occurrence MB 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in April 1989. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Spotted TurtleClemmys guttataEndangered
Assessment Criteria   B2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v); C1+2a(i) 
Reason for Designation  
This species occurs at low density, has an unusually low reproductive potential, combined with a long-lived life history, and occurs in small numbers in bogs and marshes that are fragmented and disappearing. Although some populations are in protected areas, they may have a low probability of persistence, especially because small numbers and isolation reduce population viability. The low frequency of juveniles in most studied populations suggests these populations are composed largely of remnant, aged cohorts with low reproductive success. Another clear threat is from collection for the pet trade. There is no rescue effect.
OccurrenceON QC 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in April 1991. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Western RattlesnakeCrotalus oreganosThreatened
Assessment Criteria   Met criteria for Endangered, B2ab(i,ii,iii,v), but designated as Threatened,  B2ab(i,ii,iii,v); C1+2a(i); D2, because the population is still widespread  although sparse.
Reason for Designation  
This species is threatened by rapid expansion of human activities including urbanization, agriculture, forestry and range management in south-central dry valleys of British Columbia. This snake is particularly vulnerable to roads both from direct mortality and from habitat fragmentation. Rattlesnakes are subject to direct persecution and to destruction of critical habitat (hibernacula). The adult rattlesnake population is small, likely fewer than 5,000, and dispersed among only four valleys, probably with little interchange of snakes between valleys. Threats to the species are increased in effect because this snake has late maturity (~8 years), small litters and only breeds about once every 3-4 years.
Occurrence  BC 
Status History  
Designated Threatened in May 2004. Assessment based on a new status report.
 

Amphibians

 
Small-mouthed SalamanderAmbystoma texanumEndangered
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(ii,iii,iv)+2ab(ii,iii,iv) 
Reason for Designation  
This salamander is restricted solely to Pelee Island in Canada. The extent of occurrence is only 40 Km2 (effectively the total area of Pelee Island). It occupies only three extant breeding sites and surrounding remnant forested habitat with total area of occupancy equalling not more than 5 Km2. It has exhibited declines in area, extent and quality of habitat, and in the number of locations on the island where it may be found. Threats to its continued existence include loss of wetland breeding sites and modified drainage patterns.
Occurrence   ON 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in April 1991. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 

Fishes

 
Porbeagle SharkLamna nasusEndangered
Assessment Criteria   A2bd 
Reason for Designation  
This wide-ranging oceanic shark is the only representative of its genus in the North Atlantic. The abundance has declined greatly since Canada entered the fishery in the 1990s after an earlier collapse and partial recovery. Fishery quotas have been greatly reduced, and the fishery has been closed in some areas where mature sharks occur. The landings now are comprised mostly of juveniles. Its life history characteristics, including late maturity and low fecundity, render this species particularly vulnerable to overexploitation.
OccurrenceAtlantic Ocean 
Status History  
Designated Endangered in May 2004. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
White SturgeonAcipenser transmontanusEndangered
Assessment Criteria   A2cde +4bcde 
Reason for Designation  
A long-lived species with a 30-40 year generation time and late maturity, that has suffered over a 50% decline in the last three generations. Three of six populations are in imminent threat of extirpation. Extant populations are subject to threats of habitat degradation and loss through dams, impoundments, channelization, dyking and pollution. Illegal fishing (poaching) and incidental catches are also limiting. In addition, a developing commercial aquaculture industry may also impose additional genetic, health and ecological risks to wild populations.
Occurrence BC 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in April 1990. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in November 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Bigmouth ShinerNotropis dorsalisNot at Risk
Assessment Criteria   Not applicable 
Reason for Designation  
There are no demonstrable or potential threats and the species is not particularly sensitive to habitat disturbances. It has been found in five new locations since 1985. It may also be present in unsurveyed areas of suitable habitat in western Manitoba and possibly eastern Saskatchewan.
Occurrence MB 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in April 1985. Status re-examined and designated Not at Risk in November 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Fourhorn SculpinMyoxocephalus quadricornisData Deficient
Freshwater form  
Assessment Criteria   Not applicable 
Reason for Designation  
There is a lack of necessary data to evaluate the status of this species, combined with uncertainty regarding taxonomic status.
OccurrenceNL NT NU 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in April 1989. Species considered in November 2003 and moved to the Data Deficient category. Last assessment based on an update status report.
   

Arthropods

  
 
Sand-verbena MothCopablepharon fuscumEndangered
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(ii,iii,iv,v)+2ab(ii,iii,iv,v) 
Reason for Designation  
The global population of this moth is very small and occurs in a very restricted range. The Canadian population, occurring at only three small sites, is even smaller and more restricted. The moth and its hostplant are habitat specialists dependent on coastal dunes, a rare habitat along the West Coast. This habitat has undergone extensive losses to stabilization of open dunes (including the introduction of invasive plant species), development, and recreational use. The hostplant and therefore the moth are facing the threat of continuing declines due to the loss and degradation of coastal dunes.
OccurrenceBC 
Status History  
Designated Endangered in November 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Dakota SkipperHesperia dacotaeThreatened
Assessment Criteria   Met criteria for Endangered, B2ab(iii), but was designated Threatened,  because it is not at imminent risk of extirpation.
Reason for Designation  
This butterfly is dependent on native tall-grass and mixed-grass prairie, a habitat that has suffered enormous historic losses, and the butterfly's populations have likely undergone similar declines. Current remnants of native prairie are generally not highly threatened as they are mostly unsuitable for agriculture but some habitat loss and fragmentation continue. The butterfly is very sensitive to conversion of prairie remnants to cropland, spring and summer haying, heavy grazing, controlled burns and increased pressures to drain natural sites. Although the current population of this butterfly numbers 28,500 - 40,500 individuals, these occur in only three or four disjunct populations. The long-term persistence of the butterfly is dependent on appropriate management of its habitat, most of which is privately owned.
OccurrenceMB SK 
Status History  
Designated Threatened in November 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Poweshiek SkipperlingOarisma poweshiekThreatened
Assessment Criteria   D2 
Reason for Designation  
This species occurs in Canada in a very small restricted area at 15 locations in a single metapopulation which is an isolated disjunct, with the closest population in the United Stated being about 100 km to the south. In Canada, the species is dependent on native tall-grass prairie, a habitat that has suffered enormous losses in the past, and its populations have likely undergone similar declines. Although remnant prairie habitat that supports the butterfly is unsuitable for agriculture and most of it is protected in a prairie reserve, past fire management to maintain prairie vegetation has been detrimental to the butterfly. Most of the occupied habitat is protected, but even with appropriate management, its range is so small that the butterfly is vulnerable to catastrophe.
OccurrenceMB 
Status History  
Designated Threatened in November 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 

Molluscs

 
Round PigtoePleurobema sintoxiaEndangered
Assessment Criteria   A2ace; B2ab(i,ii,iii,iv) 
Reason for Designation  
Species limited to a small area of occupancy in the Lake St.Clair and three watersheds in southern Ontario with continuing declines in habitat area, extent and quality. Threats include urban, industrial and agricultural development and irreversible impacts from zebra mussels in Lake St. Clair, with potential threats from introduction of zebra mussels in impoundments in the Sydenham River.
Occurrence ON 
Status History  
Designated Endangered in May 2004. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Rocky Mountain Ridged MusselGonidea angulataSpecial Concern
Assessment Criteria   Not applicable 
Reason for Designation  
The distribution of this species is limited to southern British Columbia in the Okanagan and Kootenay River systems. This species has likely been impacted by the damming of the Kootenay, Columbia and Okanagan Rivers and the channelization of the Okanagan River and resulted in loss or alteration of the mussel's habitat quality and extent.
Occurrence BC 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in November 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Yellow LampmusselLampsilis cariosaSpecial Concern
Assessment Criteria   Not applicable 
Reason for Designation  
Populations quite large and apparently stable in Canada but found only in Sydney River, Nova Scotia and Saint John River watershed, New Brunswick. Threats are currently very limited but there are long-term concerns related to the potential for introduction of Zebra mussels into the Saint John River, and maintaining habitat quality of the sole population in the Sydney River.
OccurrenceNB NS 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in May 2004. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Spike-lip CraterAppalachina sayanaNot at Risk
Assessment Criteria   Not applicable 
Reason for Designation  
This species is common and widespread in Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick, although apparently declining in Nova Scotia. Three records exist for Nova Scotia and it may be rare there; however there is not enough information to confirm its status.
OccurrenceNB NS ON QC 
Status History  
Designated Not at Risk in November 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Evening FieldslugDeroceras hesperiumData Deficient
Assessment Criteria   Not applicable 
Reason for Designation  
The species was last found at a single site in Comox, British Columbia in 1887 but the site has not been sampled since. Identification is difficult and is based on internal anatomy, hence requiring killing and dissection. Very recent studies suggest that taxonomy and eligibility of the species need to be re-examined.
OccurrenceBC 
Status History  
Species considered in November 2003 and placed in the Data Deficient category. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Squat DuskysnailLyogyrus granumData Deficient
Assessment Criteria   Not applicable 
Reason for Designation  
This species has been reported from 2 sites in New Brunswick and 11 in Nova Scotia, however, some surveys have been conducted and available information is insufficient to determine the current distribution and abundance of the species in either province.
OccurrenceNB NS 
Status History  
Species considered in November 2003 and placed in the Data Deficient category. Assessment based on a new status report.
 

Vascular Plants

 
 
Bog Bird's-foot TrefoilLotus pinnatusEndangered
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(ii,iii,v)+2ab(ii,iii,v); C1 
Reason for Designation  
Few small fragmented populations that are geographically restricted and found within wetland meadows of limited occurrence and considerably disjunct from the main range of the species in the Northwestern United States. Populations are at risk from continued habitat loss and encroachment of invasive species and from recreational off-road vehicular activities with the likelihood of significant losses due to planned commercial development of habitat supporting the only sizeable remaining population.
OccurrenceBC 
Status History  
Designated Endangered in May 2004. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
ButternutJuglans cinereaEndangered
Assessment Criteria   A3e+4e 
Reason for Designation  
A widespread tree found as single trees or small groups in deciduous and mixed forests of southern Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick. Butternut canker, which has caused high rates of infection and mortality in the United States, has been detected in all three provinces. High rates of infection and mortality have been observed in parts of Ontario and are predicted for the rest of the Canadian population.
Occurrence NB ON QC 
Status History  
Designated Endangered in November 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Dwarf SandwortMinuartia pusillaEndangered
Assessment Criteria   D1 
Reason for Designation  
   
An annual ephemeral herb present at a single very small vernal seepage site along a rocky maritime headland in southern Vancouver Island highly disjunct from the nearest populations in southern Washington State. The maximum population size documented totals 20 plants with numbers likely fluctuating depending on precipitation patterns. Risks to the plants arise from the susceptibility of the single small population to stochastic events and on-going disturbance of the habitat by gulls, trampling by boaters and potentially from encroaching invasive plants.
Occurrence   BC 
Status History  
Designated Endangered in May 2004. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Dwarf Woolly-headsPsilocarphus brevissimusEndangered
Assessment Criteria   B1ac(iv)+2ac(iv) 
Reason for Designation  
An annual herb present at only three sites at the northern edge of its range within very small vernal pool habitats of restricted occurrence. It is subject to extreme population fluctuations as a result of seasonal variance in precipitation. The species occurs on private lands potentially subject to human disturbances from ATV recreational use, roadside weed control and other forms of land use allowed on Agricultural Land Reserve properties.
Occurrence BC 
Status History  
Designated Endangered in November 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Pink Sand-verbenaAbronia umbellateEndangered
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(ii,iii)+2ab(ii,iii); C2a(i,ii); D1 
Reason for Designation  
An herb of maritime beach habitats last seen at a single site along the west coast of Vancouver Island with losses of two historic populations. The site of the last documented population is greatly disjunct from other small populations in Oregon. The species is found, characteristically, in low numbers and tends to persist in the seed-bed of its beach and foredune habitats, sporadically producing flowering plants. The species was last recorded in 2001 with only several plants present. It is assumed that the species may still persist as dormant seeds and may produce reproductive plants at some future date. The expansion of exotic beach grasses has reduced the quality and availability of its upper beach and foredune habitats at a number of sites within its historic range.
Occurrence BC 
Status History  
Designated Endangered in May 2004. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Rosy Owl-cloverOrthocarpus bracteosusEndangered
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii); C2a(i,ii); D1 
Reason for Designation  
An annual herb of vernal pools and damp depressions present at a single remaining location where population size fluctuates widely with low numbers that may be fewer than 100 plants a year. Expansion is limited due to lack of suitable habitats and apparent low dispersal abilities. The population is at risk from spread of nearby invasive exotic plants, from trampling due to hiker traffic and local maintenance activities related to the nearby communications site and consequences of possible oil spills occurring in the busy shipping lanes surrounding the island site.
Occurrence BC 
Status History  
Designated Endangered in May 2004. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Slender CollomiaCollomia tenellaEndangered
Assessment Criteria   B1ac(iv)+2ac(iv); D1 
Reason for Designation  
An annual herb present at a single sandy site near Princeton, British Columbia. The population fluctuates widely from year to year. At risk to stochastic events, roadside development, sand removal, and invasion by alien species.
Occurrence BC 
Status History  
Designated Endangered in November 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Small-flowered TonellaTonella tenellaEndangered
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii); C2a(i,ii) 
Reason for Designation  
A small annual herb known from a single site in the Gulf Islands, British Columbia. At risk to potential development, alien species and fire management.
OccurrenceBC 
Status History  
Designated Endangered in November 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Stoloniferous PussytoesAntennaria flagellarisEndangered
Assessment Criteria   B1ab(ii,iii,v)+2ab(ii,iii,v) 
Reason for Designation  
A short-lived perennial plant present at only three geographically restricted localities occupying very small areas of specialized habitat of ephemerally moist seepage sites on private lands. It is at greatest risk from ATV use that currently is evident in close proximity to the populations. It may also be impacted by changes in ground water hydrology and surface impacts from increased development activities in the area such as the proposed production of coalbed methane.
Occurrence  BC 
Status History  
Designated Endangered in May 2004. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Branched BartoniaBartonia paniculata ssp. PaniculataThreatened
Assessment Criteria   Met criteria for Endangered, B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii), but was designated as  Threatened, B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii); C2a(i), because it is not at imminent risk of extirpation.
Reason for Designation  
A cryptic wetland annual species of Atlantic Coastal Plain affinity, highly restricted both geographically and ecologically and present at only six of seven documented sites. Ontario populations are disjunct by about 600 km from the main range of the species with little potential for a rescue effect. The greatest potential risk is from the invasive shrub, glossy buckthorn, at two localities.
Occurrence ON 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in April 1992. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report
 
Dwarf HackberryCeltis tenuifoliaThreatened
Assessment Criteria     
Met criteria for Endangered, B1ab(iii,v)+2ab(iii,v), but was designated  Threatened, B1ab(iii,v)+2ab(iii,v); C2a(i); D1+2, because it is not at imminent risk of extirpation.
Reason for Designation  
A shrub of dry sandy or calcareous alvar woodlands habitats found at only six disjunct and fragmented sites adjacent to the Great Lakes. Fewer than 1000 plants have been documented. Threats include potential loss of habitat due to quarrying operations and sand pit expansion in eastern Ontario sites and significant losses in some years due to beetle infestations.
OccurrenceON 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in April 1985. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Gulf of St. LawrenceAsterSymphyotrichum laurentiaThreatened
Assessment Criteria   D2 
Reason for Designation  
An annual halophyte of maritime littoral habitats endemic to the Gulf of St. Lawrence. It is found at nearly 30 extant sites with some very large populations, especially on the Magdalen Islands, but has a very small total area of occupancy of much less than five square kilometres. Many of the populations are subject to natural fluctuations in size and at times suffer important losses due to severe storm events. On-going impacts also exist from human recreational activities and losses of habitat due to development activities.
OccurrenceQC NB PE 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in April 1989. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report
 
Victorin's GentianGentianopsis procera ssp. macounii var. victoriniiThreatened
Assessment Criteria   D2 
Reason for Designation  
A geographically highly restricted and short-lived annual or biennial that is endemic to the freshwater or slightly brackish shoreline areas of the St. Lawrence River estuary in Quebec. It is present at 28 extant sites but in very small localized habitats where it is at risk from a wide range of impacts. These include habitat disruption by ATVs, shoreline in-filling, mowing of vegetation, picking of flowers and potentially from oil spills.
Occurrence QC 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in April 1987. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Eastern LilaeopsisLilaeopsis chinensisSpecial Concern
Assessment Criteria   Not applicable 
Reason for Designation  
Small perennial herb reproducing both by seed and extensively by vegetative spread. It is geographically highly restricted and present in Canada at only three estuaries in Nova Scotia. The area of occupancy is very small but the population is large. No declines of significance have been documented over the last 15 years. It does not appear to have any imminent threats, however, future shoreline development or degradation could destroy extant populations.
Occurrence   NS 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in April 1987 and in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
New Jersey RushJuncus caesariensisSpecial Concern
Assessment Criteria   Met criteria for Threatened, D2, but designated as Special Concern because there are about 25 extant occurrences and likely more to be found; the species is not likely to become highly endangered since there are limited risks and the species shows some adaptability to habitat disturbance.
Reason for Designation  
The species is a globally rare plant found along the periphery of 25 bogs and fens in a geographically restricted area of southeastern Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. The Canadian population is estimated at 5000 -10,000 plants that comprise a large proportion of the global population. The Canadian plants are widely disjunct from sites along the U.S. Atlantic seaboard where the species is also quite rare. It is sensitive to activities that alter the hydrological regime of its habitat such as logging, road construction and in-filling.
OccurrenceNS 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in April 1992. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Victorin's Water-hemlockCicuta maculata var. victoriniiSpecial Concern
Assessment Criteria   Not applicable 
Reason for Designation  
A geographically highly restricted perennial that is endemic to the freshwater or slightly brackish shoreline areas of the St. Lawrence River estuary in Quebec. It is present at about 33 localities but in very small localized habitats where it is at risk from a wide range of impacts. These impacts include: actual destruction of plants due to ATV traffic and human trampling, and mowing of shoreline vegetation; losses of suitable potential shoreline habitat also occurs through shoreline in-filling and development and potential loss of plants may occur due to confusion with the common variant of the species that is considered a noxious weed. Oil spills may also pose a potential risk.
Occurrence QC 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in April 1987. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 

Mosses

 
Porsild's BryumMielichhoferia macrocarpaThreatened
Assessment Criteria   Met criteria for Endangered, C2a(i), but was designated Threatened, B2ab(ii,iii,v); C2a(i); D1+2, because the species is not at imminent risk of    extirpation.
Reason for Designation  
A rare moss with a severely fragmented distribution of 10 confirmed locations in Canada restricted to 5 general areas. The species grows in mainly mountainous areas on wet calcareous cliffs, presence of constant seepage and winter desiccation. Direct threats to populations include natural and human-caused events that destabilize the rock cliff habitat. There has been a recent a decline in habitat quality at the two most abundant locations and substantial loss of mature individual plants at one of these. Only one locality is protected. There is uncertainty in status of northern Canadian populations.
OccurrenceAB BC NL NU 
Status History  
Designated Threatened in November 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Columbian Carpet MossBryoerythrophyllum columbianumSpecial Concern
Assessment Criteria   Not applicable 
Reason for Designation  

This is a western North American endemic species. It is a small perennial species and in Canada has a restricted distribution in the shrub-steppe in semi-arid regions of British Columbia where recent surveys have confirmed its presence from 11 sites. The species is never abundant in sites where it is found and extensive surveys have provided few new locations. At least one population is believed to have been lost to cultivation (vineyard) or to stochastic events. Threats include agriculture (especially vineyards), impact by grazing animals, urban development, road improvements, and human recreational impacts. Based on known occurrences, the species appears to have a very restricted distribution. However the species is patchily distributed at low densities in large habitats not all of which have been censused.
Occurrence BC 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in May 2004. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Twisted Oak MossSyntrichia laevipilaSpecial Concern
Assessment Criteria   Met criteria for Threatened, D2, but designated as Special Concern because of the high potential numbers of Garry Oak host.
Reason for Designation  
This moss is a small species that occurs from British Columbia and Washington southward to California. The Canadian populations are at the northern limits of their range in western North America, and in Canada the species has a restricted distribution where it occurs in the area of south-eastern Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands. The species is known from 25 sites where it restricted to the bark of trees, in particular Garry oaks. This species is never dominant where it grows, nor is it frequent in large oak stands. Many of the known populations are in protected areas. The major threat to the species is the disappearance of mature Garry oaks, which would result in the extirpation of most populations of this species.
Occurrence  BC 
Status History  
Designated Special Concern in May 2004. Assessment based on a new status report.
 

Lichens

 
Flooded JellyskinLeptogium rivulareThreatened
Assessment Criteria   D2 
Reason for Designation  
This is a globally rare species currently known in Canada from only 4 locations, all in Ontario and Manitoba. The species has very restricted habitat requirements, found primarily at the margins of seasonal (vernal) pools, where it grows on rocks and at the base of living deciduous trees between the seasonal high and low water marks. It is vulnerable to changes in normal patterns of annual flooding, as well as to death of host trees. Major threats to the largest populations include urban development and recreational activity.
Occurrence MB ON 
Status History  
Designated Threatened in May 2004. Assessment based on a new status report.
   
Deferred Reports 
November 2003  
Following discussion by COSEWIC, the report on Stoloniferous Pussytoes, Antennaria flagellaris, and the update report on Bathurst Aster, Symphyotrichum subulatum, (Bathurst population) were withdrawn to allow incorporation of additional information.
May 2004  
The reports on Hill's Thistle (Cirsium hillii), Rusty Cord-moss (Entosthodon rubiginosus), Alkaline Wing-nerved Moss (Pterygoneurum kozlovii) and Provancher's Fleabane (Erigeron philadelphicus ssp. provancheri) were deferred to allow incorporation of additional information.


Return to Table of Contents

Appendix VIII

CANADIAN SPECIES

AT RISK

May 2004


Cover Illustration: Peary Caribou, Tuktu, Rangifer tarandus pearyi, designated Endangered by COSEWIC in May 2004. Drawing by Shelly O'Gorman, Iqaluit, Nunavut.

 

Aussi disponible en français

 

For additional copies contact:

COSEWIC Secretariat
c/o Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
Ottawa, ON
K1A 0H3

Tel.: (819) 997-4991 / (819) 953-3215
Fax: (819) 994-3684
E-mail: COSEWIC/COSEPAC@ec.gc.ca

Web site: http://www.cosewic.gc.ca

Courier address:
4th Floor,
Place Vincent Massey,
351 St. Joseph Blvd.,
Gatineau, QC.
J8Y 3Z5



Cover Illustration: Peary Caribou, Tuktu, Rangifer tarandus pearyi, designated Endangered by COSEWIC in May 2004. Drawing by Shelly O'Gorman, Iqaluit, Nunavut.

This publication can be cited as follows: COSEWIC. 2004. Canadian Species at Risk, May 2004. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. 49 pp.


COSEWIC Status Reports are available from the Species at Rist Act Public Registry http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca

 

ABOUT COSEWIC

 

COSEWIC MANDATE

The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) assesses the national status of wild species, subspecies, varieties, or other designatable units that are considered to be at risk in Canada. Designations are made on native species including the following taxonomic groups: mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fishes, arthropods, molluscs, vascular plants, mosses, and lichens.

COSEWIC MEMBERSHIP

COSEWIC comprises members from each provincial and territorial government wildlife agency, four federal agencies (Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, and the Federal Biodiversity Information Partnership, chaired by the Canadian Museum of Nature), three non-government members and the co-chairs of the species specialist and the Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge subcommittees. The Committee meets to consider status reports on candidate species.

DEFINITIONS

The following definitions were reviewed by COSEWIC in May 2004:

Wildlife species   a species, subspecies, variety, or geographically or genetically distinct population of animal, plant or other organism, other than a bacterium or virus, that is wild by nature and it is either native to Canada or has extended its range into Canada without human intervention and has been present in Canada for at least 50 years.

Extinct (X)   A wildlife species that no longer exists.

Extirpated (XT)   A wildlife species no longer existing in the wild in Canada, but occurring elsewhere.

Endangered (E)   A wildlife species facing imminent extirpation or extinction.

Threatened (T)   A wildlife species likely to become endangered if limiting factors are not reversed.

Special Concern (SC)*   A wildlife species that may become a threatened or an endangered species because of a combination of biological characteristics and identified threats.

Not at Risk (NAR)**   A species that has been evaluated and found to be not at risk of extinction given the current circumstances.

Data Deficient (DD)***   A wildlife species for which there is inadequate information to make a direct, or indirect, assessment of its risk of extinction.



________________________
*   Formerly described as "Vulnerable" from 1990 to 1999, or "Rare" prior to 1990.
**   Formerly described as "Not In Any Category", or "No Designation Required."
***   Formerly described as "Indeterminate" from 1994 to 1999 or "ISIBD" (insufficient scientific information on which to base a designation) prior to 1994.

Return to Table of Contents

Summary Tables

 

Species designated in the "risk" and the Extinct categories, and
the Not at Risk and Data Deficient categories

Table 1. Summary of COSEWIC's assessment results for the "risk" categories (Extirpated, Endangered, Threatened and Special Concern) (444 species) and for the Extinct category (12 species). The results include the May 2004 meeting.
TAXON EXTINCTEXTIRPATEDENDANGEREDTHREATENEDSPECIAL
CONCERN   
TOTALS
Mammals
2
4
20
14
26
66
Birds 
3
2
23
10
22
60
Reptiles
0
4
7
12
9
32
Amphibians
0
1
6
5
7
19
Fishes
5
2
21
22
29
79
Arthropods 
0
3
6
5
2
16
Molluscs 
1
2
12
2
4
21
Vascular Plants   
0
2
67
41
35
145
Mosses 
1
1
5
2
2
11
Lichens 
0
0
2
1
4
7
Total
12
21
169
114
140
456


Table 2. Summary of COSEWIC's assessment results for the Not at Risk category. The results include the May 2004 meeting.
TAXONNOT AT RISK
Mammals   44
Birds  35
Reptiles  5
Amphibians    14
Fishes   35
Arthropods   0
Molluscs   2
Vascular Plants   16
Mosses   0
Lichens   0
Totals   151

 

Table 3. Summary of COSEWIC's assessment results for the Data Deficient category. The results include the May 2004 meeting.
TAXONDATA
DEFICIENT
Mammals   1010
Birds    2
Reptiles    2
Amphibians    0
Fishes    9
Arthropods   0
Molluscs    4
Vascular Plants    4
Mosses   0
Lichens  2
Totals   33

 

Results from the May 2004 COSEWIC meeting

Table 4. May 2004 results by category and taxon.
TAXONEXTINCT EXTIRPATEDENDANGEREDTHREATENED SPECIAL
CONCERN
NOT
AT RISK   
DATA
DEFICIENT   
TOTALS
Mammals 
 
3
3
5
1
1
13
Birds   
1
2
 
 
 
3
3Reptiles  
2
1
 
 
 
3
Amphibians  
1
 
 
 
 
1
Fishes   
1
 
 
 
 
1
Arthropods 
 
 
 
 
 
 
0
Molluscs    
1
 
1
 
 
2
Vascular Plants 
 
5
2
3
 
 
10
Mosses 
 
 
 
2
 
 
2
Lichens   1    
Totals
0
0
14
9
11
1
1
36



Table 5. May 2004 results by category and type of change.
TYPE OF CHANGEEXTINCT EXTIRPATEDENDANGEREDTHREATENED SPECIAL CONCERNNOT
AT RISK   
DATA DEFICIENT   TOTALS
New 
 
8
4
3
 
 
15
In a higher risk category 2 
 
4
2
1
 
 
7
In a lower risk category 3 
 
 
1
 
 
 
1
No Change   4 
 
1
1
5
1
 
8
Changed 5 
 
 
 
2
 
1
1
Reassigned 6 
 
1
1
 
 
 
4
No longer at risk 7 
 
 
 
 
 
 
0
Totals 
0
0
14
9
11
1
1
36


Explanation of status change symbols for reassessed species

2 Species placed in a higher risk category after reassessment on the date shown.
3 Species placed in a lower risk category after reassessment on the date shown.
4 Species stays in the same category after reassessment on the date shown.
5 Species moved to the Data Deficient category from a risk category, or to a risk category from the Data Deficient category on the date shown.
6 Species that has been assigned to a different designatable unit than previously on the date shown.
7 Species moved to the Not at Risk category from a risk category on the date shown.
(no symbol) New species examined on the date shown.




Return to Table of Contents

COSEWIC Assessment Results

The tables that follow (Tables 6-9) are organized by status category and then by taxonomic group. For each species, the information provided includes the common name, scientific name, population name, and range of occurrence in Canada (by province, territory or ocean). For birds, range of occurrence includes the Canadian breeding and wintering distribution. The most recent date of assessment by COSEWIC is shown. The symbols on the left provide information on the type of status report used as the basis for reassessment for species evaluated against quantitative criteria (see below), and the symbols on the right provide information on the outcome of status reassessments (see explanation of symbols on page three).

The first COSEWIC "Endangered Species List" was issued in 1978. In 1990, it was decided that all species considered by COSEWIC should be included in this document even if the species were in the Not at Risk or Data Deficient categories. Therefore, this document is divided into four sections. The first section (Table 6) includes species assessed and designated as Extinct. The second section (Table 7) includes species assessed and designated as Extirpated, Endangered, Threatened or Special Concern. The third section (Table 8) includes species assessed and found to be in the Not at Risk category. The fourth section (Table 9) includes species considered by COSEWIC and placed in the Data Deficient category because of insufficient scientific information.

Evaluation with COSEWIC's quantitative criteria

COSEWIC has been using quantitative criteria to assess species' risk of extinction since October 1999. These criteria were adapted from the criteria used by the World Conservation Union (IUCN).

Explanation of type of status report symbols for species evaluated using quantitative criteria

0 or 0+ Assessment based on a new status report or an update status report. A plus sign (+) indicates the report has an addendum or that the report has been modified.

1 or 1+ Species re-assessed using an existing status report. A plus sign (+) indicates the report has an addendum or that the report has been modified.

Geographical occurrence abbreviations

AB   Alberta 
BC   British Columbia 
MB   Manitoba 
NB   New Brunswick
NL   Newfoundland and    Labrador       
NS   Nova Scotia  
NT   Northwest Territories  
NU   Nunavut   
ON   Ontario
PE   PrinceEdward Island
QC   Québec
SK   Saskatchewan
YT   Yukon Territory


Table 6. Species assessed and designated Extinct, with range of occurrence (by province, territory or ocean) and date of last assessment. The historical range of occurrence and the approximate date of disappearance are shown (12 species).

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EXTINCT CATEGORY (12)
Taxon/
Assessment
Details
[1]
Common
Name 
Scientific
Name 
Population
Name   
Historical
Range of
Occurrence   
Extinction
Date   
Assessment
Date


Mammals (2)
0 4Caribou dawsoni subspecies?    Rangifer tarandus dawsoni BC1920sMay 2000
1 4Mink, Sea Mustela macrodon  NB NS Atlantic Ocean   1894May 2000
Birds (3)
1 4Auk, Great   Pinguinus impennis    QC NB NS NL1844May 2000
1 4Duck, Labrador Camptorhynchus labradorius QC NB NS NL  1875    May 2000
1 4Pigeon, Passenger Ectopistes migratorius   SK MB ON QC NB NS PE   1914 May 2000
Reptiles (0)
Amphibians (0)
Fishes (5)
1 4Cisco, DeepwaterCoregonus johannae         ON 1952 May 2000
1 4Dace, Banff LongnoseRhinichthys cataractae smithi        AB 1986   May 2000
1 4Stickleback, Benthic Hadley Lake   Gasterosteus sp.         BC 1999May 2000
1 4Stickleback, Limnetic Hadley Lake   Gasterosteus sp BC1999May 2000
1 4Walleye, Blue   Stizostedion vitreum glaucum        ON1965May 2000
Arthropods (0)
Molluscs (1)
1 4Limpet, Eelgrass   Lottia alveus alveus        QC NS NL   1929May 2000
Vascular Plants (0)
Mosses (1)
0Moss, Macoun's Shining   Neomacounia nitida         ONnot observed since 1864   Nov 2002
Lichens (0)



Table 7. Species assessed and designated in a "risk category" (Extirpated, Endangered, Threatened or Special Concern), with range of occurrence (by province, territory or ocean) and date of assessment. For Extirpated species, the historical range of occurrence and the approximate date of disappearance from Canada are shown (444 species).

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EXTIRPATED CATEGORY (21)
Taxon/
Assessment
Details
[1]
Common
Name   
Scientific 
Name
Population
Name   
Historical
Range of
Occurrence
Extinction
Date   
Assessment
Date
Mammals (4)
0 4Bear, Grizzly   Ursus arctos    Prairie population   AB SK MB   1880sMay 2002
1 4Ferret, Black-footed   Mustela nigripes         AB SK MB   1974May 2000
1 4Walrus, Atlantic   Odobenus rosmarus rosmarusNorthwest
Atlantic
Population
Atlantic Ocean   mid 19th century   May 2000
1 4Whale, Grey   Eschrichtius robustus  Atlantic population  Atlantic Ocean   before end of 1800s   May 2000
Birds (2) 
1 4Prairie-Chicken, GreaterTympanuchus cupido AB SK MB ON   last reported in 1987 in Saskatchew May 2000
1 4Sage-Grouse phaios subspecies, Greater   Centrocercus urophasianus phaios    BCnot observed since 1960s   May 2000
Reptiles (4)              
0Gophersnake, Pacific   Pituophis catenifer catenifer  BC   not observed since 1957   May 2002
1 4 Lizard, Pigmy Short-horned   Phrynosoma douglasiiBritish Columbia population   BClast reported in 1898, near Osoyoos, BC   May 2000
0Rattlesnake, Timber   Crotalus horridus     ON1941May 2001
0Turtle, Pacific Pond   Actinemys marmorata      BC not observed since 1959   May 2002
Amphibians (1) 
0  Salamander, Tiger   Ambystoma tigrinum    Great Lakes population   ON   1915Nov 2001
Fishes (2)
1 4?   Chub, Gravel   Erimystax x-punctatus    ONlast reported in 1958, Thames River drainage   May 2000
1 4?   Paddlefish   Polyodon spathula     ON1917May 2000
Arthropods (3)
1 4Blue, Karner   Lycaeides melissa samuelis        ON   1991   May 2000
1 4Elfin, Frosted   Callophrys [Incisalia] irus         ON   1988May 2000
1 4Marble, Island   Euchloe ausonides         BC   before 1910   May 2000
Molluscs (2)
0Snail, Puget Oregonian   Cryptomastix devia         BCnot observed since 1905   Nov 2002
1 4Wedgemussel, Dwarf   Alasmidonta heterodon       NB 1968   May 2000
Vascular Plants (2) 
1 4Spring Blue-eyed Mary   Collinsia verna         ON   not observed since 1954   May 2000
1 4Tick-trefoil, Illinois   Desmodium illinoense    ONnot observed since 1888   May 2000
Mosses (1) 
0Moss, Incurved Grizzled   Ptychomitrium incurvum   ON1828   Nov 2002
Lichens (0) 

 

 

ENDANGERED CATEGORY (169)
Taxon/
Assessment
Details
[1]
Common
Name   
Scientific
Name   
Population
Name   
Range of
Occurrence   
Assessment
Date
Mammals (20)
0 6Badger jacksoni subspecies, American   Taxidea taxus jacksoni        ON   May 2000
0 6Badger jeffersonii subspecies, AmericanTaxidea taxus jeffersonii      BCMay 2000
0 6Caribou, Peary   Rangifer tarandus pearyi        NT NU   May 2004
0 4Caribou, Woodland   Rangifer tarandus caribou   Atlantic-Gaspésie population   QCMay 2002
1 4Fox, Swift   Vulpes velox         AB SK   May 2000
1+ 4Marmot, Vancouver Island   Marmota vancouverensis         BCMay 2000
1 4Marten, NewfoundlandMartes americana atrata        NLMay 2000
0 2Mole, Townsend's   Scapanus townsendii         BCMay 2003
0 2Whale, Beluga   Delphinapterus leucas    Eastern Hudson Bay population  NU QC Arctic Ocean Atlantic Ocean   May 2004
0 4Whale, Beluga   Delphinapterus leucas    Ungava Bay population  QC Arctic Ocean Atlantic Ocean   May 2004
0 6Whale, Blue   Balaenoptera musculus    Atlantic population  Atlantic Ocean   May 2002
0 6Whale, Blue   Balaenoptera musculus    Pacific population   Pacific Ocean   May 2002
 Whale, Bowhead   Balaena mysticetus    Eastern Arctic population   NU Arctic Ocean   Apr 1980
 Whale, Bowhead   Balaena mysticetus    Western Arctic population YT NT NU Arctic Ocean   Apr 1986
1+ 6Whale, Killer   Orcinus orca    Northeast Pacific southern resident population  Pacific Ocean   Nov 2001
0 6Whale, North Atlantic Right   Eubalaena glacialis         Atlantic Ocean   May 2003
4Whale, North Pacific Right   Eubalaena japonica         ?    Pacific Ocean   Apr 1990
1+ 2Whale, Northern Bottlenose   Hyperoodon ampullatus    Scotian Shelf population   Atlantic Ocean   Nov 2002
0Whale, Sei   Balaenoptera borealis    Pacific population   Pacific Ocean   May 2003
0 4WolverineGulo gulo    Eastern population QC NL   May 2003
Birds (23) 
0+ 4Bobwhite, Northern   Colinus virginianus ONNov 2003
0 2Chat auricollis subspecies, Yellow-breasted   Icteria virens auricollis   ?    British Columbia population BCNov 2000
0 4Crane, Whooping   Grus americana         NT AB   Nov 2000
0 Crossbill percna subspecies, Red   Loxia curvirostra percna        NLMay 2004
0 4Curlew, Eskimo   Numenius borealis YT NT NU BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL   May 2000
0 4Flycatcher, Acadian   Empidonax virescens         ONNov 2000
0?       Lark strigata subspecies, Horned   Eremophila alpestris strigata        BCNov 2003
1 4?   Owl caurina subspecies, Spotted   Strix occidentalis caurina        BCMay 2000
1 4Owl, Barn   Tyto alba    Eastern population ON QC   May 2000
1 4Owl, Burrowing   Athene cunicularia BC AB SK MB   May 2000
0 6Plover circumcinctus subspecies, Piping   Charadrius melodus circumcinctus AB SK MB ON   May 2001
0 6Plover melodus subspecies, Piping   Charadrius melodus melodus        QC NB NS PE NL   May 2001
0 6Plover, Mountain   Charadrius montanus AB SK   Nov 2000
0 4Rail, King   Rallus elegans       ONNov 2000
1 4Sage-Grouse urophasianus subspecies, Greater   Centrocercus urophasianus urophasianus        AB SK   May 2000
0 6Screech-Owl macfarlanei subspecies, Western   Megascops kennicottii macfarlanei        BC May 2002
0 4Shrike migrans subspecies, Loggerhead   Lanius ludovicianus migrans MB ON QC   Nov 2000
0 4Sparrow, Henslow's   Ammodramus henslowii         ONNov 2000
1 4Tern, Roseate   Sterna dougallii         QC NB NS   Oct 1999
0 4Thrasher, Sage   Oreoscoptes montanus     BC AB SKNov 2000
1 4Warbler, Kirtland's   Dendroica kirtlandii         ON   May 2000
1 4Warbler, Prothonotary Protonotaria citrea         ONMay 2000
0 2Woodpecker, White-headed   Picoides albolarvatus   BC   Nov 2000
Reptiles (7)
0NightsnakeHypsiglena torquata     BC    May 2001
0 4Racer, Blue   Coluber constrictor foxii        ONMay 2002
0 4Seaturtle, Leatherback   Dermochelys coriacea Pacific Ocean Atlantic Ocean   May 2001
0 2Skink, Prairie   Eumeces septentrionalis         MB May 2004
1 4Snake, Sharp-tailed   Contia tenuis    BCOct 1999
0 2Turtle, Spotted   Clemmys guttata         ON QC   May 2004
 Watersnake, Lake Erie   Nerodia sipedon insularum         ON   Apr 1991
Amphibians (6)      
0 4Frog, Northern Cricket   Acris crepitans         ONMay 2001
1 4Frog, Northern Leopard   Rana pipiensSouthern Mountain populationBCMay 2000
0 4Frog, Oregon Spotted   Rana pretiosa         BCMay 2000
0Frog, Rocky Mountain Tailed   Ascaphus montanus BCMay 2000
0 2Salamander, Small-mouthed   Ambystoma texanum         ON May 2004
0Salamander, Tiger   Ambystoma tigrinum    Southern Mountain population  BCNov 2001
Fishes (21)  
0 6Cod, Atlantic   Gadus morhua    Newfoundland and Labrador population   Atlantic Ocean   May 2003
1 4Dace, Nooksack   Rhinichthys sp.         BCMay 2000
0 2Dace, Speckled   Rhinichthys osculus         BCNov 2002
1 2Lamprey, Morrison Creek   Lampetra richardsoni         BCMay 2000
1+ 2Madtom, Northern   Noturus stigmosus         ONNov 2002
0Salmon, Atlantic   Salmo salar    Inner Bay of Fundy populations   NB NS Atlantic Ocean   May 2001
0Salmon, Coho   Oncorhynchus kisutch    Interior Fraser population   BC Pacific Ocean   May 2002
0 4Salmon, Sockeye   Oncorhynchus nerka    Cultus population   BC Pacific Ocean   May 2003
0 4Salmon, Sockeye   ?    Oncorhynchus nerka    Sakinaw population   BC Pacific Ocean   May 2003
0Shark, Porbeagle   Lamna nasus         Atlantic Ocean   May 2004
0 2Shiner, Pugnose   Notropis anogenus ONNov 2002
0 6Stickleback, Benthic Enos Lake   Gasterosteus sp.         BC   Nov 2002
1 2Stickleback, Benthic Paxton Lake   Gasterosteus sp.         BC   May 2000
1 2Stickleback, Benthic Vananda Creek   Gasterosteus sp.         BCMay 2000
0 6Stickleback, Limnetic Enos Lake   Gasterosteus sp.         BC   Nov 2002
1 2Stickleback, Limnetic Paxton Lake   Gasterosteus sp.         BCMay 2000
1 2Stickleback, Limnetic Vananda Creek   Gasterosteus sp.         BCMay 2000
0 2Sturgeon, White   Acipenser transmontanus         BCNov 2003
0 4Sucker, Salish   Catostomus sp BCNov 2002
0 4Trout, Aurora   Salvelinus fontinalis timagamiensis        ON May 2000
0 4Whitefish, Atlantic   Coregonus huntsmani    NSNov 2000
Arthropods (6)
0Blue, Island   Plebejus saepiolus insulanus        BCNov 2000
0Checkerspot, Taylor's   Euphydryas editha taylori BCNov 2000
0Metalmark, Mormon   Apodemia mormo    Southern Mountain population   BCMay 2003
0Moth, Sand-verbena   Copablepharon fuscum         BC Nov 2003
0Moth, Yucca   Tegeticula yuccasella         ABMay 2002
1 4Ringlet, Maritime   Coenonympha tullia nipisiquit        QC NBMay 2000
Molluscs (12)
1 4Bean, Rayed   Villosa fabalis ONMay 2000
0Forestsnail, Oregon   Allogona townsendiana     BCNov 2002
0Hickorynut, Round   Obovaria subrotunda  ONMay 2003
0Kidneyshell Ptychobranchus fasciolaris ON May 2003
1 4Lampmussel, Wavy-rayed   Lampsilis fasciola ONOct 1999
0Mussel, Mudpuppy   Simpsonaias ambigua         ONMay 2001
1 4Physa, Hotwater   Physella wrighti         BCMay 2000
0Pigtoe, Round   Pleurobema sintoxia ON   May 2004
1+ 4Riffleshell, Northern   Epioblasma torulosa rangiana  ON May 2000
1 2Snail, Banff Springs   Physella johnsoni ABMay 2000
0Snail, Lake Winnipeg Physa   Physa sp.         MB   Nov 2002
0SnuffboxEpioblasma triquetra ONMay 2001
Vascular Plants (67)
1+ 4Agalinis, Gattinger's   Agalinis gattingeri         ONMay 2001
1 4Agalinis, Skinner's   Agalinis skinneriana         ON May 2000
1 4Ammannia, Scarlet   Ammannia robusta         BC ON   May 2001
1 4Avens, Eastern Mountain   Geum peckii         NSMay 2000
1 4Balsamroot, Deltoid   Balsamorhiza deltoidea         BC May 2000
1 4BlueheartsBuchnera americana ONMay 2000
1+ 4Braya, Long's Braya longii   NLMay 2000
0Bugbane, TallActaea elata    BCMay 2001
0 2Bulrush, Bashful   Trichophorum planifolium ONMay 2000
1 4Bush-clover, Slender   Lespedeza virginica         ONMay 2000
1 4Buttercup, Water-plantain   Ranunculus alismaefolius var. alismaefolius        BCMay 2000
0ButternutJuglans cinerea         NB ON QC   Nov 2003
1 4Cactus, Eastern Prickly Pear   Opuntia humifusa ONMay 2000
0Catchfly, Coastal Scouler's   Silene scouleri ssp. grandis BCMay 2003
0Collomia, Slender   Collomia tenella BCNov 2003
1 4Coreopsis, PinkCoreopsis rosea         NSMay 2000
1 4Cryptanthe, Tiny   Cryptantha minima         AB SK   May 2000
1 4Fern, Southern Maidenhair   Adiantum capillus-veneris BCMay 2000
0 2Fringed-orchid, Eastern Prairie   Platanthera leucophaea ONMay 2003
0 4Fringed-orchid, Western Prairie   Platanthera praeclara         MBMay 2000
0 4Gentian, White Prairie   Gentiana alba      ONMay 2001
1 4Ginseng, American   Panax quinquefolius      ON QC   May 2000
1+ 2Goat's-rue, Virginia   Tephrosia virginiana ONMay 2000
1 4Goldenrod, Showy   Solidago speciosa ONMay 2000
0Grass, Forked Three-awned   Aristida basiramea    ON QCNov 2002
1 4Lady's-slipper, Small White   Cypripedium candidum         MB ON   May 2000
0 2Lipocarpha, Small-flowered   Lipocarpha micrantha         BC ON   Nov 2002
1 4Lotus, Seaside Birds-foot   Lotus formosissimus         BC   May 2000
1 4Lousewort, Furbish's   Pedicularis furbishiae         NBMay 2000
1 4Lupine, Prairie   Lupinus lepidus var. lepidus        BC   May 2000
0Lupine, Streambank Lupinus rivularis BC  Nov 2002
1 4Milkwort, Pink   Polygala incarnata         ON   May 2000
1 4Mountain-mint, Hoary   Pycnanthemum incanum         ONMay 2000
1 4Mulberry, Red   Morus rubra ON   May 2000
1 4Owl-clover, Bearded   Triphysaria versicolor ssp. versicolor        BCMay 2000
0Owl-clover, Rosy   Orthocarpus bracteosus         BCMay 2004
1+ 2Paintbrush, Golden   Castilleja levisecta         BCMay 2000
1 4Plantain, Heart-leaved   Plantago cordata         ONMay 2000
1 4Pogonia, Large Whorled   Isotria verticillata         ONMay 2000
1 4Pogonia, Nodding   Triphora trianthophora         ONMay 2000
1 4Pogonia, Small Whorled   Isotria medeoloides         ON   May 2000
0Pussytoes, StoloniferousAntennaria flagellaris         BC   May 2004
0 4Quillwort, Engelmann's   Isoëtes engelmannii         ON May 2001
0Rush, Kellogg's   Juncus kelloggii         BCMay 2003
0Sand-verbena, Pink   Abronia umbellata BCMay 2004
0 2Sand-verbena, Small-flowered   Tripterocalyx micranthus       AB SKNov 2002
0Sandwort, Dwarf   Minuartia pusilla BCMay 2004
0Sanicle, Bear's-foot   Sanicula arctopoides   BCMay 2001
1 2Sedge, False Hop   Carex lupuliformis     ON QC   May 2000
1 4Sedge, Juniper Carex juniperorum ONMay 2000
0Spike-rush, Horsetail   Eleocharis equisetoides ONNov 2000
0 4Sundew, Thread-leaved   Drosera filiformis         NSMay 2001
1 4Thistle, Pitcher'sCirsium pitcheri ON   May 2000
0Tonella, Small-flowered   Tonella tenella     BCNov 2003
1 4Toothcup  Rotala ramosior         BC ONMay 2000
1 4Tree, Cucumber   Magnolia acuminata ONMay 2000
0Trefoil, Bog Bird's-foot   Lotus pinnatus  BCMay 2004
1 4Trillium, DroopingTrillium flexipes ONMay 2000
0Triteleia, Howell's   Triteleia howellii BCMay 2003
1+ 4Twayblade, Purple   Liparis liliifolia    ONMay 2001
0 2Violet, Bird's-foot   Viola pedata   ONMay 2002
0Willow, Barrens   Salix jejuna NL May 2001
1 4Wintergreen, Spotted   Chimaphila maculata         ON QC   May 2000
1+ 4Wood-poppy   Stylophorum diphyllum         ONMay 2000
1 2Woodsia, Blunt-lobedWoodsia obtusa ON QC   May 2000
0Woolly-heads, Dwarf   Psilocarphus brevissimus BC Nov 2003
0Woolly-heads, Tall   Psilocarphus elatior    Pacific population   BCMay 2001
Mosses (5)
0Moss, Margined Streamside   Scouleria marginata         BCNov 2002
0Moss, Poor Pocket   Fissidens pauperculus BCNov 2001
1+ 2Moss, Rigid AppleBartramia stricta BCMay 2000
0Moss, Silver Hair   Fabronia pusilla BCNov 2002
0Moss, Spoon-leaved   Bryoandersonia illecebra ONMay 2003
Lichens (2)
0Lichen, Boreal Felt   Erioderma pedicellatum    Atlantic population   NB NS   May 2002
1 4Seaside Centipede   Heterodermia sitchensis         BCMay 2000



[1]Explanation of status change symbols for reassessed species
0 or 0+: Assessment based on a new status report or an update status report. A plus sign (+) indicates the report has an addendum or that the report has been modified.
1 or 1+: Species re-assessed using an existing status report. A plus sign (+) indicates the report has an addendum or that the report has been modified.
2: Species placed in a higher risk category after reassessment on the date shown.
3: Species placed in a lower risk category after reassessment on the date shown.
4: Species stays in the same category after reassessment on the date shown.
5: Species moved to the Data Deficient category from a risk category, or to a risk category from the Data Deficient category on the date shown.
6: Species that has been assigned to a different designatable unit than previously on the date shown.
7: Species moved to the Not at Risk category from a risk category on the date shown.
(no symbol) New species examined on the date shown.

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COSEWIC Assessment Results (continue)

 

THREATENED CATEGORY (114)
Taxon/
Assessment
Details
[1]
Common
Name   
Scientific
Name   
Population
Name   
Range of
Occurrence   
Assessment
Date
Mammals (14)
0 2Bat, Pallid   Antrozous pallidus         BCMay 2000
0Bison, Plains   Bison bison bison BC AB SK MB   May 2004
0 4Bison, Wood   Bison bison athabascae  YT NT BC AB   May 2000
0 4Caribou, Woodland   Rangifer tarandus caribou Boreal population   NT BC AB SK MB ON QC NL   May 2002
0 4Caribou, Woodland   Rangifer tarandus caribou   Southern Mountain population   BC AB   May 2002
0 2Ermine
haidarum subspecies   
Mustela erminea haidarum        BCMay 2001
0 2Fox, Grey   Urocyon cinereoargenteus         MB ON   May 2002
1 4Otter, Sea   Enhydra lutris BC Pacific Ocean   May 2000
1+ 4Shrew, Pacific Water   Sorex bendirii         BCMay 2000
0 6Whale, Beluga   Delphinapterus leucas    Cumberland Sound population   NU Arctic OceanMay 2004
0 3Whale, Beluga   Delphinapterus leucas    St. Lawrence Estuary population QC Atlantic Ocean   May 2004
0 4Whale, Humpback   Megaptera novaeangliae    North Pacific population   Pacific Ocean   May 2003
1+ 6Whale, Killer   Orcinus orca    Northeast Pacific
northern resident population   
Pacific Ocean   Nov 2001
1+ 2Whale, Killer   Orcinus orca    Northeast Pacific
transient population 
Pacific Ocean   Nov 2001
Birds (10) 
0Albatross, Short-tailed   Phoebastria albatrus         BC Nov 2003
1 2Bittern, Least   Ixobrychus exilis         MB ON QC NB   Nov 2001
1 4Falcon anatum
subspecies, Peregrine   
Falco peregrinus anatum        YT NT NU BC AB SK
MB ON QC NB NS NL   
May 2000
0 2Goshawk laingi
subspecies, Northern   
Accipiter gentilis laingi        BCNov 2000
1 2Gull, Ross's   Rhodostethia rosea NT NU MBNov 2001
0 4Murrelet, Marbled   Brachyramphus marmoratus BCNov 2000
1 4Pipit, Sprague's   Anthus spragueii AB SK MBMay 2000
0Shearwater, Pink-footedPuffinus creatopus BCMay 2004
0 4Shrike excubitorides
subspecies, Loggerhead
Lanius ludovicianus excubitorides  AB SK MB   May 2004
0 4?   Warbler, Hooded   Wilsonia citrina ONNov 2000
Reptiles (12)
1 4Foxsnake, Eastern   Elaphe gloydi         ONMay 2000

1 2Gartersnake, Butler's   Thamnophis butleri         ONNov 2001
0Gophersnake, Great Basin   Pituophis catenifer deserticola BCMay 2002
0 4Massasauga   Sistrurus catenatus         ONNov 2002
1 4Ratsnake, Eastern   Elaphe obsoleta ON   May 2000
0Rattlesnake, Western   Crotalus oreganus         BCMay 2004
0Ribbonsnake, Eastern   Thamnophis sauritus    Atlantic population NS   May 2002
1 2Snake, Eastern Hog-nosed   Heterodon platirhinos ON   Nov 2001
1 4Snake, Queen   Regina septemvittata ON May 2000
0 4Softshell, Spiny   Apalone spinifera         ON QC   May 2002
0Stinkpot Sternotherus odoratus         ON QC   May 2002
 Turtle, Blanding's   Emydoidea blandingii    Nova Scotia population NS   Apr 1993
Amphibians (5)  
1+ 2Salamander, Allegheny Mountain Dusky   Desmognathus ochrophaeus QC Nov 2001
0 2Salamander, Coastal Giant Dicamptodon tenebrosus BCNov 2000
0Salamander, Jefferson   Ambystoma jeffersonianum ON Nov 2000
1 2Spadefoot, Great Basin   Spea intermontana BCNov 2001
1+ 4Toad, Fowler's Bufo fowleri ONNov 2000
Fishes (22)
0Bocaccio   Sebastes paucispinis Pacific Ocean   Nov 2002
1+ 2Chubsucker, LakeErimyzon sucetta ONNov 2001
 Cisco, Blackfin Coregonus nigripinnis ON Apr 1988
0 4Cisco, Shortjaw   Coregonus zenithicus         NT AB SK MB ONMay 2003
 Cisco, Shortnose   Coregonus reighardi         ONApr 1987
0 6Cod, Atlantic   Gadus morhuaLaurentian North populationAtlantic Ocean   May 2003
0Cusk   Brosme brosme  Atlantic Ocean   May 2003
0 4Darter, ChannelPercina copelandi ON QCMay 2002
1+ 4Darter, Eastern Sand   Ammocrypta pellucida         ON QC   Nov 2000
1 2Gar, Spotted   Lepisosteus oculatus         ONNov 2000
1 2Lamprey, Cowichan Lake   Lampetra macrostoma  BCNov 2000
1+ 2Minnow, Western Silvery   Hybognathus argyritis         ABNov 2001
 Redhorse, Black   Moxostoma duquesnei         ON   Apr 1988
  Redhorse, Copper   Moxostoma hubbsi QCApr 1987
1 2Sculpin, Cultus Pygmy   Cottus sp. BCNov 2000
 Sculpin, Deepwater   Myoxocephalus thompsoni    Great Lakes populationsONApr 1987
0 4Sculpin, Shorthead   Cottus confusus      BCMay 2001
1 2Shiner, Carmine   Notropis percobromus MBNov 2001
1 4Smelt, Lake Utopia Dwarf   Osmerus sp. NB   May 2000
 Whitefish, Lake   Coregonus clupeaformis    Lake Simcoe populationONApr 1987
0Wolffish, Northern   Anarhichas denticulatus Arctic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean    
May 2001
0Wolffish, Spotted   Anarhichas minor         Arctic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean   
May 2001
Arthropods (5)
0Hairstreak, Behr's (Columbia)   Satyrium behrii columbia        BC    Nov 2000
0Metalmark, Mormon   Apodemia mormo    Prairie population   SKMay 2003
0Skipper, Dakota   Hesperia dacotae MB SK   Nov 2003
0Skipper, Dun   Euphyes vestris    Western population   BC    Nov 2000
0Skipperling, Poweshiek   Oarisma poweshiek         MB Nov 2003
Molluscs (2)
1 4Abalone, Northern   Haliotis kamtschatkana    Pacific Ocean   May 2000
0Jumping-slug, Dromedary   Hemphillia dromedarius    BCMay 2003
Vascular Plants (41)
0 4Aster, Anticosti   Symphyotrichum anticostense QC NBMay 2000
1 2Aster, Crooked-stem   Symphyotrichum prenanthoides    ONMay 2002
0 2?   Aster, Gulf of St. Lawrence   Symphyotrichum laurentianum QC NB PE   May 2004
0 2Aster, Western Silvery   Symphyotrichum sericeum MB ON   May 2000
0 4Aster, White Wood   Eurybia divaricata    ON QCNov 2002
1+ 4Aster, White-top   Sericocarpus rigidus BC   May 2000
1 2Aster, Willowleaf   Symphyotrichum praealtum    ONMay 2003
0 2Bartonia, Branched   Bartonia paniculata ssp. paniculata  ONNov 2003
0 2Blazing Star, Dense   Liatris spicata         ONMay 2001
0 4Blue-flag, Western   Iris missouriensis    ABMay 2000
1 4Braya, Fernald's   Braya fernaldii NLMay 2000
1 2BuffalograssBuchloë dactyloides SK MBNov 2001
 Chestnut, American   Castanea dentata ON Apr 1987
0 4Coffee-tree, Kentucky Gymnocladus dioicus         ONNov 2000
0 4ColicrootAletris farinosa    ONNov 2000
0Corydalis, Scouler's   Corydalis scouleri BCMay 2001
0Daisy, Lakeside   Hymenoxys herbacea ON  May 2002
0 4Deerberry   Vaccinium stamineum ONNov 2000
0Fern, Lemmon's Holly   Polystichum lemmonii     BC   May 2003
1 4Gentian, PlymouthSabatia kennedyana NSMay 2000
0 2Gentian, Victorin's   Gentianopsis procera spp.
macounii var. victorinii       
 QCMay 2004
1 4Golden Crest   Lophiola aurea    NSMay 2000
0 4Goldenseal Hydrastis canadensis         ONMay 2000
1+ 4Greenbrier, Round-leaved   Smilax rotundifolia    Great Lakes
Plains population 
ON May 2001
0 2Hackberry, Dwarf Celtis tenuifolia ON   Nov 2003
0 2Hoptree, Common   Ptelea trifoliata  ONNov 2002
0 2Hyacinth, Wild   Camassia scilloides ON May 2002
0 4Jacob's-ladder, Van Brunt's   Polemonium vanbruntiae         QC Nov 2002
0Lily, Lyall's Mariposa   Calochortus lyallii BCMay 2001
1 4Mosquito-fern, Mexican   Azolla mexicana    BCMay 2000
1+ 3Mouse-ear-cress, Slender   Halimolobos virgata   AB SK   May 2000
0 2Orchid, Phantom   Cephalanthera austiniae BCMay 2000
1+ 4Prairie-clover, Hairy   Dalea villosa var. villosa  SK MB   May 2000
1 4 Redroot   Lachnanthes caroliana         NSMay 2000
0Sanicle, Purple   Sanicula bipinnatifida   BCMay 2001
0 2SoapweedYucca glauca AB May 2000
0 2Spiderwort, Western   Tradescantia occidentalis         AB SK MB Nov 2002
0Spike-rush, Tubercled   Eleocharis tuberculosa NSMay 2000
1 4Violet, Yellow Montane   Viola praemorsa ssp. praemorsa        BCMay 2000
1 4Water-pennywort   Hydrocotyle umbellata NSMay 2000
0 4Water-willow, American   Justicia americana         ON QCMay 2000
Mosses (2)
0Bryum, Porsild's   Mielichhoferia macrocarpa AB BC NL NUNov 2003
0Moss, Haller's Apple   Bartramia halleriana         BC AB   Nov 2001
Lichens (1)
0Jellyskin, Flooded   Leptogium rivulare MB ON   May 2004


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SPECIAL CONCERN CATEGORY (140)
Taxon/
Assessment
Details
[1]
Common
Name   
Scientific
Name  
Population
Name   
Range of
Occurrence   
Assessment
Date


Mammals (26)                
0 4Bat, Spotted   Euderma maculatum         BC May 2004
0 4Bear, Grizzly   Ursus arctosNorthwestern population   YT NT NU BC AB   May 2002
1+ 4Bear, Polar   Ursus maritimus YT NT NU MB ON QC NL   Nov 2002
1 4Beaver, Mountain   Aplodontia rufa         BC   Nov 2001
0 6Caribou, Barren-ground   Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus   Dolphin and Union population   NT NU   May 2004
0 2Caribou, Woodland   Rangifer tarandus caribou   Northern Mountain population   YT NT BC   May 2002
 Cottontail nuttallii subspecies, Nuttall's   Sylvilagus nuttallii nuttallii        BC Apr 1994
 Kangaroo Rat, Ord's   Dipodomys ordii         AB SK   Apr 1995
1 4Mole, Eastern   Scalopus aquaticus   ONNov 2000
 Mouse megalotis subspecies, Western Harvest   Reithrodontomys megalotis megalotis        BCApr 1994
0 3Porpoise, Harbour   Phocoena phocoena    Northwest Atlantic population   Atlantic Ocean   May 2003
0 5Porpoise, Harbour   Phocoena phocoena    Pacific Ocean population   Pacific Ocean   Nov 2003
1 4Prairie Dog, Black-tailed   Cynomys ludovicianus    SK   Nov 2000
0 2Sea Lion, Steller   Eumetopias jubatus   BC Pacific Ocean   Nov 2003
 Seal Lacs des Loups Marins  subspecies, Harbour   Phoca vitulina mellonae        QC  Apr 1996
 Shrew, Gaspé   Sorex gaspensis         QC NB NS   Apr 1988
 Squirrel, Southern Flying   Glaucomys volans         ON QC NS   Apr 1988
1 4Vole, WoodlandMicrotus pinetorum ON QC  Nov 2001
0 4Whale, Beluga   Delphinapterus leucas    Eastern High Arctic - Baffin Bay population   NU Arctic Ocean   May 2004
0 6Whale, Beluga   Delphinapterus leucas    Western Hudson Bay population   MB NU ON Arctic
Ocean Atlantic Ocean   
May 2004
 Whale, Fin   Balaenoptera physalus         Atlantic Ocean Pacific Ocean   Apr 1987
0 2Whale, Grey   Eschrichtius robustus    Eastern North Pacific population   Pacific Ocean Arctic Ocean   May 2004
1+Whale, Killer   Orcinus orca    Northeast Pacific offshore population   Pacific Ocean   Nov 2001
 Whale, Sowerby's Beaked   Mesoplodon bidens         Atlantic Ocean   Apr 1989
0 5Wolf, Eastern   Canis lupus lycaon        ON QC   May 2001
0 4WolverineGulo gulo    Western population   YT NT NU BC
AB SK MB ON   
May 2003
Birds (22)
0 4Chat virens subspecies, Yellow-breasted   Icteria virens virens        ON Nov 2000
0 4Curlew, Long-billed   Numenius americanus   BC AB SK   Nov 2002
0 3Duck, Harlequin   Histrionicus histrionicus    Eastern population   NU QC NB NS NL   May 2001
1 4Falcon pealei subspecies, Peregrine   Falco peregrinus pealei        BC   Nov 2001
3Falcon tundrius subspecies, Peregrine   Falco peregrinus tundrius        YT NT NU QC NL   Apr 1992
0Goldeneye, Barrow's   Bucephala islandica    Eastern population   QC NB NS PE NL   Nov 2000
1 4Gull, Ivory   Pagophila eburnea         ?    YT NT NU NLNov 2001
3Hawk, Ferruginous   Buteo regalis         AB SK MB   Apr 1995

4Hawk, Red-shouldered   Buteo lineatus         ON QC NB   Apr 1996
 Heron fannini subspecies, Great Blue   Ardea herodias fannini        BCApr 1997
 Murrelet, Ancient   Synthliboramphus antiquus          BC   Apr 1993
1 4Owl, Barn   Tyto alba    Western population   BC Nov 2001
1 4Owl, FlammulatedOtus flammeolus         BC Nov 2001
 Owl, Short-eared   Asio flammeus         YT NT NU BC AB SK
MB ON QC NB NS PE NL   
Apr 1994
1 4Rail, Yellow   Coturnicops noveboracensis         NT BC AB SK MB ON QC NB   Nov 2001
0 6Screech-Owl kennicottii subspecies, Western   Megascops kennicottii kennicottii        BC   May 2002
0 4Sparrow princeps subspecies, Savannah   Passerculus sandwichensis princeps        NS   May 2000
 Thrush, Bicknell's   Catharus bicknelli         QC NB NS   Apr 1999
0 4Warbler, Cerulean   Dendroica cerulea         ON QC   May 2003
4Waterthrush, Louisiana   Seiurus motacilla         ON QC   Apr 1996
1 4Woodpecker, Lewis's   Melanerpes lewis BCNov 2001
 Woodpecker, Red-headed   Melanerpes erythrocephalus         SK MB ON QC   Apr 1996
Reptiles (9)                
0Boa, Rubber   Charina bottae         BCMay 2003
 Lizard, Greater Short-horned   Phrynosoma hernandesi         AB SK   Apr 1992
0MilksnakeLampropeltis triangulum         ON QC   May 2002
 Racer, Eastern Yellow-bellied   Coluber constrictor flaviventris        SK   Apr 1991
0Ribbonsnake, Eastern   Thamnophis sauritus    Great Lakes population   ONMay 2002
 Skink, Five-lined   Eumeces fasciatus         ON   Apr 1998
0Skink, Western   Eumeces skiltonianus         BC May 2002
0Turtle, Northern Map   Graptemys geographica         ON QC   May 2002
 Turtle, Wood   Glyptemys insculpta         ON QC NB NS   Apr 1996
Amphibians (7)
0Frog, Coast Tailed   Ascaphus truei         BCMay 2000
1 4Frog, Northern Leopard   Rana pipiensWestern Boreal/Prairie populations   NT AB SK MB   Nov 2002
1 4Frog, Red-legged   Rana aurora BCMay 2002
1+ 4?   Salamander, Coeur d'Alene   Plethodon idahoensis         BCNov 2001
1 4Salamander, Spring   Gyrinophilus porphyriticus         ON QC   May 2002
1 4Toad, Great Plains   Bufo cognatus       AB SK MB   May 2002
0Toad, WesternBufo boreaS YT NT BC AB   Nov 2002
Fishes (29)            
 Buffalo, Bigmouth   Ictiobus cyprinellus         SK MB ON   Apr 1989
 Buffalo, Black   Ictiobus niger         ONApr 1989
0 4Chub, Silver   Macrhybopsis storeriana         MB ON   May 2001
  Cisco, Spring   Coregonus sp.         QC   Apr 1992
0 6Cod, Atlantic   Gadus morhua    Arctic population   Arctic Ocean   May 2003
0 6Cod, Atlantic   Gadus morhua    Maritimes population   Atlantic Ocean   May 2003
 Dace, Redside   Clinostomus elongatus         ON   Apr 1987
 Dace, Umatilla   Rhinichthys umatilla         BCApr 1988
 Darter, Greenside   Etheostoma blennioides         ON Apr 1990
0 4?   Killifish, Banded   Fundulus diaphanus    Newfoundland population   NLMay 2003
  Kiyi   Coregonus kiyi         ON  Apr 1988
 Lamprey, Chestnut   Ichthyomyzon castaneus         SK MB   Apr 1991
 Lamprey, Northern Brook   Ichthyomyzon fossor         MB ON QC   Apr 1991
0 4Minnow, Pugnose   Opsopoeodus emiliae         ON   May 2000
4Redhorse, River   Moxostoma carinatum         ON QC   Apr 1987
0Sculpin, Columbia Mottled   Cottus bairdi hubbsi        BCMay 2000
1+ 4Shiner, Bridle   Notropis bifrenatus         ON QC   Nov 2001
4Shiner, Silver   Notropis photogenis ON   Apr 1987
 Stickleback, Charlotte Unarmoured   Gasterosteus sp. BC Apr 1983
 Stickleback, Giant   Gasterosteus sp.         BC   Apr 1980
 Sturgeon, Green   Acipenser medirostris         BCApr 1987
 Sturgeon, Shortnose   Acipenser brevirostrum         NB  Apr 1980
1+ 4Sucker, Spotted   Minytrema melanops         ONNov 2001
 Sunfish, Orangespotted Lepomis humilis         ONApr 1989
 Sunfish, Redbreast   Lepomis auritus         NB Apr 1989
0 4Topminnow, Blackstripe   Fundulus notatus         ONMay 2001
1+ 4WarmouthLepomis gulosus         ON Nov 2001
 Whitefish, Squanga   Coregonus sp.         YTApr 1987
0Wolffish, Atlantic   Anarhichas lupus         Atlantic Ocean   Nov 2000
Arthropods (2)                
1 4Monarch Danaus plexippus         BC AB SK MB
ON QC NB NS PE   
Nov 2001
0Weidemeyer's Admiral   Limenitis weidemeyerii         AB May 2000
Molluscs (4)                
0Jumping-slug, Warty   Hemphillia glandulosa         BCMay 2003
0Lampmussel, Yellow   Lampsilis cariosa         NB NS   May 2004
0Mussel, Rocky Mountain Ridged   Gonidea angulata         BC   Nov 2003
0Oyster, Olympia   Ostrea conchaphila    BCNov 2000
Vascular Plants (35)
0 3Ash, Blue   Fraxinus quadrangulata         ON Nov 2000
 Aster, Bathurst   Symphyotrichum subulatum    Bathurst population   NBApr 1992
0Beggarticks, Vancouver Island   Bidens amplissima         BCNov 2001
 Bulrush, Long's   Scirpus longii NSApr 1994
 Columbo, American   Frasera caroliniensis         ONApr 1993
0Fern, American Hart's-tongue   Asplenium scolopendrium         ON    Nov 2000
 Fern, Broad Beech   Phegopteris hexagonoptera ON QCApr 1983
0 4Fern, Coastal Wood   Dryopteris arguta         BC  Nov 2001
 Fleabane, Provancher's   Erigeron philadelphicus var. provancheri QC Apr 1992
0Goldenrod, Riddell's   Solidago riddellii         MB ON    Nov 2000
 Goosefoot, Smooth   Chenopodium subglabrum         AB SK MB   Apr 1992
 Green DragonArisaema dracontium         ON QC   Apr 1984
1 4Hairgrass, Mackenzie   Deschampsia mackenzieana         SK   Nov 2001
3Helleborine, Giant   Epipactis gigantea         BCApr 1998
1+ 4?   Indian-plantain, Tuberous   Arnoglossum plantagineum         ONMay 2002
0 4Lilaeopsis, Eastern   Lilaeopsis chinensis         NS May 2004
 Locoweed, Hare-footed   Oxytropis lagopus         ABApr 1995
 Meadowfoam, Macoun's   Limnanthes macounii         BCApr 1988
1 4Milk-vetch, Fernald's   Astragalus robbinsii var. fernaldii QC NL   Nov 2001
1Oak, Shumard   Quercus shumardii         ONApr 1999
1+ 3Pepperbush, Sweet   Clethra alnifolia         NS May 2001
 Pondweed, Hill's   Potamogeton hillii ONApr 1986
 Quillwort, Bolander's   Isoëtes bolanderi AB Apr 1995
1+ 3Rose, Climbing Prairie   Rosa setigera   ON   May 2003
 Rose-mallow, Swamp   Hibiscus moscheutos         ONApr 1987
 Rue-anemone, False   Enemion biternatum         ON   Apr 1990
0 4Rush, New Jersey   Juncus caesariensis         NS  May 2004
0Tansy, Floccose   Tanacetum huronense var. floccosum        SK May 2000
1 4Thrift, Athabasca   Armeria maritima ssp. interior        SK   May 2002
0 4Water-hemlock, Victorin's   Cicuta maculata var. victorinii        QC   May 2004
0Willow, Felt-leaf   Salix silicicola         NU SK   May 2000
0 Willow, Sand-dune Short-capsuled   Salix brachycarpa var. psammophila  SK May 2000
0Willow, Turnor's   Salix turnorii         SKMay 2000
0Woolly-heads, Tall   Psilocarphus elatior    Prairie population   AB SK   May 2001
0Yarrow, Large-headed Woolly   Achillea millefolium var. megacephalum        SKMay 2000
Mosses (2)                   
0Moss, Columbian Carpet   Bryoerythrophyllum columbianum         BC   May 2004
0Moss, Twisted Oak   Syntrichia laevipila         BC   May 2004
Lichens (4)               
 Cryptic Paw   Nephroma occultum         BCApr 1995
0Lichen, Boreal Felt   Erioderma pedicellatum    Boreal population   NL May 2002
 Oldgrowth SpecklebellyPseudocyphellaria rainierensis          BC   Apr 1996
 Seaside Bone   Hypogymnia heterophylla         BCApr 19965



[1]Explanation of status change symbols for reassessed species
0 or 0+: Assessment based on a new status report or an update status report. A plus sign (+) indicates the report has an addendum or that the report has been modified.
1 or 1+: Species re-assessed using an existing status report. A plus sign (+) indicates the report has an addendum or that the report has been modified.
2: Species placed in a higher risk category after reassessment on the date shown.
3: Species placed in a lower risk category after reassessment on the date shown.
4: Species stays in the same category after reassessment on the date shown.
5: Species moved to the Data Deficient category from a risk category, or to a risk category from the Data Deficient category on the date shown.
6: Species that has been assigned to a different designatable unit than previously on the date shown.
7: Species moved to the Not at Risk category from a risk category on the date shown.
(no symbol) New species examined on the date shown.

Return to Table of Contents

COSEWIC Assessment Results (continue)

Table 8. Species assessed and found to be in the Not at Risk category, with geographical occurrence (by province, territory or ocean) and date of last assessment (151 species).

 

NOT AT RISK CATEGORY (151)
Taxon/
Assessment
Details
[1]
Common
Name   
Scientific
Name   
Population
Name   
Range of
Occurrence   
Assessment
Date
Mammals (44)               
0 6Badger taxus subspecies, American   Taxidea taxus taxus        AB SK MB   May 2000
4Bear, American Black   Ursus americanus         YT NT NU BC AB
SK MB ON QC NB NS NL   
Apr 1999
0 4Caribou, Woodland   Rangifer tarandus caribou   Newfoundland
population   
NLMay 2002
4Cottontail pinetis subspecies, Nuttall's   Sylvilagus nuttallii pinetis        AB SK   Apr 1994
 Dolphin, Atlantic White-sided   Lagenorhynchus acutus         Atlantic Ocean   Apr 1991
 Dolphin, Bottlenose   Tursiops truncatus         Atlantic Ocean   Apr 1993
 Dolphin, Common   Delphinus delphis         Atlantic Ocean Pacific Ocean   Apr 1991
 Dolphin, Northern Right Whale   Lissodelphis borealis         Pacific Ocean   Apr 1990
 Dolphin, Pacific White-sided   Lagenorhynchus obliquidens         Pacific Ocean   Apr 1990
 Dolphin, Risso's   Grampus griseus         Atlantic Ocean Pacific Ocean   Apr 1990
 Dolphin, Striped   Stenella coeruleoalba         Atlantic Ocean Pacific Ocean   Apr 1993
 Dolphin, White-beaked   Lagenorhynchus albirostris         Atlantic Ocean   Apr 1998
7Gopher, Plains Pocket   Geomys bursarius         MB   Apr 1998
0 4Lynx, Canada   Lynx canadensis         YT NT NU BC AB
SK MB ON QC NB NS NL   
May 2001
4Narwhal Monodon monceros         Arctic Ocean   Apr 1987
 Porpoise, Dall's   Phocoenoides dalli         Pacific Ocean   Apr 1989
 Sea Lion, California   Zalophus californianus         BC Pacific Ocean   Apr 1987
 Seal Pacific subspecies, Harbour   Phoca vitulina richardsi        BC Pacific Ocean   Apr 1999
 Seal, Bearded   Erignathus barbatus         NL NU NT YT
Atlantic Ocean Arctic Ocean   
Apr 1994
 Seal, Grey   Halichoerus grypus         NB NL NS PE QC Atlantic Ocean    Apr 1999
 Seal, Hooded   Cystophora cristata         NL NU QC Atlantic Ocean   Apr 1986
 Seal, Northern Elephant   Mirounga angustirostris         BC Pacific Ocean   Apr 1986
 Seal, Northern Fur   Callorhinus ursinus         BC Pacific Ocean   Apr 1996
 Seal, Ringed   Phoca hispida         NL NU NT YT
Atlantic Ocean Arctic Ocean   
Apr 1989
 Squirrel, Cascade Mantled Ground   Spermophilus saturatus          BC   Apr 1992
 Squirrel, Fox   Sciurus niger         MB ON   Apr 1979
 Walrus, Atlantic   Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus   Eastern
Arctic population   
Arctic Ocean   Apr 1987
7Weasel, Prairie Long-tailed   Mustela frenata longicauda        AB SK MB   Apr 1993
 Whale, Baird's Beaked   Berardius bairdii         Pacific Ocean   Apr 1992
0 4Whale, Beluga   Delphinapterus leucas    Eastern Beaufort
Sea population   
NT Arctic Ocean   May 2004
 Whale, Blainville's Beaked   Mesoplodon densirostris         Atlantic Ocean   Apr 1989
        Whale, Cuvier's Beaked   Ziphius cavirostris         Atlantic Ocean Pacific Ocean   Apr 1990
 Whale, False Killer   Pseudorca crassidens         Pacific Ocean   Apr 1990
 Whale, Hubbs' Beaked   Mesoplodon carlhubbsi         Pacific Ocean   Apr 1989
0 7Whale, Humpback   Megaptera novaeangliae    Western North
Atlantic population   
Atlantic Ocean   May 2003
 Whale, Long-finned Pilot   Globicephala melas         Atlantic Ocean   Apr 1994
 Whale, Northern Bottlenose   Hyperoodon ampullatus    Davis Strait
population   
Atlantic Ocean   Apr 1993
 Whale, Pygmy Sperm   Kogia breviceps         Atlantic Ocean Pacific Ocean   Apr 1994
 Whale, Short-finned Pilot   Globicephala macrorhynchus         Pacific Ocean   Apr 1993
 Whale, Sperm   Physeter macrocephalus         Atlantic Ocean Pacific Ocean   Apr 1996
 Whale, Stejneger's Beaked   Mesoplodon stejneri         Pacific Ocean   Apr 1989
 Whale, True's Beaked   Mesoplodon mirus         Atlantic Ocean   Apr 1989
 Wolf, Northern Grey   Canis lupus occidentalis        YT NT NU BC AB
SK MB ON QC NL   
Apr 1999
 Wolf, Southern Grey   Canis lupus nubilus        BC Apr 1999
Birds (35)                   
7Bluebird, Eastern   Sialia sialis         AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE   Apr 1996
0 4Chat auricollis subspecies, Yellow-breasted Icteria virens auricollis   Prairie population   AB SK   Nov 2000
 Coot, American   Fulica americana         YT NT NU BC AB
SK MB ON QC NB NS   
Apr 1991
 Cormorant, Double-crested   Phalocrocorax auritus         YT NT BC AB SK
MB ON QC NB NS PE NL   
Apr 1978
 Crane tabida subspecies, Sandhill   Grus canadensis tabida        BC MB ON   Apr 1979
 Eagle, Bald   Haliaeetus leucocephalus         YT NT NU BC AB SK
MB ON QC NB NS PE NL   
Apr 1984
4Eagle, Golden   Aquila chrysaetos         YT NT NU BC
AB SK MB ON QC NL   
Apr 1996
4Falcon, Prairie   Falco mexicanus         BC AB SK   Apr 1996
 Flycatcher, Grey   Empidonax wrightii         BCApr 1992
 Goshawk atricapillus subspecies, Northern   Accipiter gentilis atricapillus        YT NT NU BC AB SK
MB ON QC NB NS PE NL   
Apr 1995
 Grebe, Red-necked   Podiceps grisegena         YT NT NU BC AB SK
MB ON QC NS NL   
Apr 1982
4GyrfalconFalco rusticolus      YT NT NU BC
AB SK ON QC NS PE NL   
Apr 1987
 Harrier, Northern   Circus cyaneus         YT NT NU BC AB SK
MB ON QC NB NS PE NL   
Apr 1993
7Hawk, Cooper's   Accipiter cooperii         BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS   Apr 1996
 Hawk, Red-tailed   Buteo jamaicensis         YT NT NU BC AB SK
MB ON QC NB NS PE NL   
Apr 1995
 Hawk, Rough-legged   Buteo lagopus         YT NT NU BC MB ON QC NL   Apr 1995
4Hawk, Sharp-shinned   Accipiter striatus         YT NT NU BC AB SK
MB ON QC NB NS PE NL   
Apr 1997
 Loon, Common   Gavia immer YT NT NU BC AB SK
MB ON QC NB NS PE NL   
Apr 1997
 Loon, Yellow-billed   Gavia adamsii         YT NT NU BC AB MB QC   Apr 1997
 Merlin  Falco columbarius         YT NT NU BC AB SK
MB ON QC NB NS PE NL   
Apr 1985
 Owl, Boreal   Aegolius funereus         YT NT NU BC AB SK
MB ON QC NB NS PE NL   
Apr 1995
7Owl, Great Grey   Strix nebulosa         YT NT BC AB SK MB ON QC   Apr 1996
 Owl, Northern Hawk   Surnia ulula         YT NT BC AB SK
MB ON QC NB NL   
Apr 1992
 Owl, Snowy   Bubo scandiaca         YT NT NU MB QC NL   Apr 1995
7Pelican, American White   Pelecanus erythrorhynchos         BC AB SK MB ON   Apr 1987
 Screech-Owl, Eastern   Megascops asio         SK MB ON QC NB   Apr 1986
7Sparrow, Baird's   Ammodramus bairdii         AB SK MB   Apr 1996
 Sparrow, Nelson's Sharp-tailed   Ammodramus nelsoni         BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE   Apr 1998
7Swan, Trumpeter   Cygnus buccinator         YT NT BC AB SK ON   Apr 1996
4Tern, Black   Chlidonias niger         NT BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS   Apr 1996
7Tern, Caspian   Sterna caspia         NT BC AB SK MB ON QC NL   Apr 1999
 Tern, Common   Sterna hirundo         NT AB SK MB
ON QC NB NS PE NL   
Apr 1998
7Warbler, Prairie   Dendroica discolor         ONApr 1999
 Wren, Canyon   Catherpes mexicanus   BCApr 1992
 Wren, Sedge   Cistothorus platensis         AB SK MB ON QC NB   Apr 1993
Reptiles (5)                
0Brownsnake, DeKay's   Storeria dekayi         ON QC   May 2002
0Gartersnake, Northwestern   Thamnophis ordinoides         BCMay 2003
0Lizard, Northern Alligator   Elgaria coerulea BCMay 2002
 Racer, Western Yellow-bellied   Coluber constrictor mormon  BC Apr 1991
0Watersnake, Northern   Nerodia sipedon sipedon        ON QC   May 2002
Amphibians (14)               
 Ensatina   Ensatina eschscholtzii BCApr 1999
0Frog, Columbia Spotted   Rana luteiventris         YT BC AB   May 2000
 Frog, Northern Leopard   Rana pipiens    Eastern population   ON QC NB NS NL   Apr 1999
 Frog, Pickerel   Rana palustris         ON QC NB NS   Apr 1999
0Frog, Western Chorus   Pseudacris triseriata         ON QC    May 2001
0Mudpuppy   Necturus maculosus   MB ON QC   May 2000
 Salamander, Four-toed   Hemidactylium scutatum         ON QC NB NS   Apr 1999
 Salamander, Northern Dusky   Desmognathus fuscus         ON QC NB   Apr 1999
 Salamander, Northwestern   Ambystoma gracile          BC   Apr 1999
0Salamander, Tiger   Ambystoma tigrinum    Prairie /
Boreal population   
AB SK MB   Nov 2001
0Salamander, Western Red-backed   Plethodon vehiculum         BCNov 2001
0Spadefoot, Plains   Spea bombifrons         AB SK MB   May 2003
0Toad, Canadian   Bufo hemiophrys         NT AB SK MB   May 2003
 Treefrog, Cope's Grey   Hyla chrysoscelis MBApr 1999
Fishes (35)
 Bloater Coregonus hoyi         ONApr 1988
0 5Chiselmouth   Acrocheilus alutaceus         BCMay 2003
 Chub, Hornyhead   Nocomis biguttatus MB ON   Apr 1988
 Chub, River   Nocomis micropogon ONApr 1988
 Dace, Leopard   Rhinichthys falcatus         BCApr 1990
 Darter, Least   Etheostoma microperca ON Apr 1989
 Darter, River   Percina shumardi         MB ON   Apr 1989
 Darter, Tessellated   Etheostoma olmstedi         ON QC   Apr 1993
 Herring, Blueback   Alosa aestivalis         NB NS   Apr 1980
 Killifish, Banded   Fundulus diaphanus    Mainland
population   
MB ON QC NB NS PE NL   Apr 1989
0 7Madtom, BrindledNoturus miurus ON May 2001
 Minnow, Bluntnose   Pimephales notatus         MB ON QCApr 1998
 Minnow, Cutlips   Exoglossum maxillingua         ON QC   Apr 1994
 Minnow, Eastern Silvery   Hybognathus regius  ON QC   Apr 1997
 Pickerel, Chain   Esox niger QC NB NS   Apr 1997
 Pickerel, Redfin   Esox americanus americanus  QC   Apr 1998
 Redhorse, Golden   Moxostoma erythrurum   MB ONApr 1989
0 7Sardine, Pacific   Sardinops sagax Pacific OceanMay 2002
 Sculpin, FourhornMyoxocephalus quadricornisSalt water form   Arctic Ocean Atlantic
Ocean Pacific Ocean   
Apr 1989
 Sculpin, Spoonhead   Cottus ricei YT NT BC AB SK MB ON QC   Apr 1989
0 7Shiner, Bigmouth   Notropis dorsalis MBNov 2003
 Shiner, Blackchin   Notropis heterodon MB ON QC   Apr 1994
 Shiner, Ghost   Notropis buchanani         ONApr 1993
 Shiner, Redfin   Lythrurus umbratilis ONApr 1988
 Shiner, Rosyface Notropis rubellus   ON QCApr 1994
 Shiner, Striped   Luxilus chrysocephalus ONApr 1993
 Shiner, Weed   Notropis texanus         MB Apr 1999
 Silverside, Brook   Labidesthes sicculus         ON QC   Apr 1989
7Stoneroller, Central   Campostoma anomalum         ON   Apr 1998
 Sturgeon, Lake   Acipenser fulvescens         AB SK MB ON QC   Apr 1986
 Sucker, Mountain   Catostomus platyrhynchus       BC AB SK   Apr 1991
 Sunfish, Green          Lepomis cyanellus         ONApr 1987
 Sunfish, Longear   Lepomis megalotis         ON QC   Apr 1987
0Wolf-eel   Anarrhichthys ocellatus         Pacific Ocean   May 2003
 Y-Prickleback   Allolumpenus hypochromus    BCApr 1991
Arthropods (0) 
Molluscs (2)
0Capshell, Rocky Mountain   Acroloxus coloradensis    Western population   BC AB   Nov 2001
0Crater, Spike-lip   Appalachina sayana         NB NS ON QC   Nov 2003
Vascular Plants (16)
 Aster, Short's   Symphyotrichum shortii         ONApr 1999
 Aster, Yukon   Symphyotrichum yukonense YT NT   Apr 1996
 Brickellia, Large-floweredBrickellia grandiflora BC AB Apr 1996
 Fameflower   Talinum sediforme         BCApr 1990
 Fleabane, Dwarf   Erigeron radicatus         AB SK   Apr 1996
 Goldenweed, Northern Mock   Stenotus borealis         YT   Apr 1997
 Mermaid, False   Floerkea proserpinacoides         ON QC NS   Apr 1984
 Phlox, Blue   Phlox alyssifolia  AB SK   Apr 1996
 Pink, Rush   Stephanomeria runcinata         AB SK   Apr 1996
 Rhododendron, Pacific   Rhododendron macrophyllum      BCApr 1997
 Sagebrush, Wood's   Artemisia rupestris ssp. woodii YTApr 1997
 Sedge, Nebraska   Carex nebrascensis ABApr 1995
 Stitchwort, SandStellaria arenicola         AB SKApr 1992
 Wallflower, Narrow-leaved   Erysimum angustatum YTApr 1993
7Willow, Tyrrell's   Salix tyrrellii NT SK   Apr 1999
 Woolly-heads, Slender   Psilocarphus tenellus var. tenellus       BC Apr 1996
Mosses (0) 
Lichens (0) 

 

Table 9. Species considered and placed in the Data Deficient category because of insufficient scientific information, with geographical occurrence (by province, territory or ocean) and date of last assessment (33 species).

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DATA DEFICIENT CATEGORY (33)
Taxon/ Assessment
Details
[1]
Common
Name   
Scientific
Name   
Population
Name   
Range of
Occurrence   
Assessment
Date
Mammals (10)               
0 5Bat, Fringed   Myotis thysanodes         BCMay 2004
0 5Bat, Keen's Long-eared   Myotis keenii         BCNov 2003
5Cougar Puma concolor couguar   Eastern population   ON QC NB NS   Apr 1998
 Mouse dychei subspecies, Western Harvest   Reithrodontomys megalotis dychei  ABApr 1994
 Seal Altantic subspecies, Harbour   Phoca vitulina concolor        MB NB NL NS NU ON PE
Atlantic Ocean Arctic Ocean   
Apr 1999
 Vole, Sagebrush Lemmiscus curtatus      AB SK   Apr 1996
 Whale, Dwarf Sperm   Kogia simus    Pacific Ocean   Apr 1997
1+ 4Whale, Killer   Orcinus orca    Northwest Atlantic /
Eastern
Arctic populations 
Arctic Ocean Atlantic Ocean   Nov 2001
0Whale, Sei   Balaenoptera borealis    Atlantic population   Atlantic Ocean   May 2003
 Wolf, Arctic Grey   Canis lupus arctos        NT NU   Apr 1999
Birds (2)            
 Poorwill, Common   Phalaenoptilus nuttallii         BC AB SKApr 1993
 Tern, Forster's   Sterna forsteri         BC AB SK MB ON   Apr 1996
Reptiles (2)               
0BullsnakePituophis catenifer sayi        AB SK   May 2002
0Turtle, Eastern Box   Terrapene carolina carolina        ON May 2002
Amphibians (0)               
Fishes (9)                   
 Catfish, Flathead   Pylodictis olivaris         ON Apr 1993
 Cisco, Bering   Coregonus laurettae         YT   Apr 1990
 Lamprey, Darktail   Lethenteron alaskense   NTApr 1990
0 5Madtom, Margined   Noturus insignis    ON QC   May 2002
0 5Prickleback, Pighead   Acantholumpenus mackayi         Arctic Ocean   May 2003
0 5Sculpin, Fourhorn   Myoxocephalus quadricornis    Freshwater form   NL NT NU   Nov 2003
 Sculpin, Spinynose Asemichthys taylori Pacific Ocean   Apr 1997
1 4Whitefish, LakeCoregonus clupeaformis    Mira River population   NS Nov 2000
0 5Wolffish, Bering   Anarhichas orientalis Arctic Ocean   Nov 2002
Arthropods (0)               
Molluscs (4)                
0Capshell, Rocky Mountain   Acroloxus coloradensis    Eastern population   ON QC   Nov 2001
0Duskysnail, Squat   Lyogyrus granum         NB NS   Nov 2003
0Fieldslug, Evening   Deroceras hesperium BCNov 2003
 Snail, Gatineau Tadpole   Physella parkeri latchfordi        QCApr 1997
Vascular Plants (4)
 Barley, Little   Hordeum pusillum         ABApr 1993
 Goldenweed, Rabbit-brush   Ericameria bloomeri          BC   Apr 1997
 Pinweed, ImpoverishedLechea intermedia var. depauperata  SKApr 1997
 Whitlow-grass, KananaskisDraba kananaskis ABApr 1992
Mosses (0) 
Lichens (2)  
0Stubble, Flexuous Golden   Chaenotheca servitii         NSNov 2002
0Stubble, Red Oak   Phaeocalicium minutissimum QC NB   Nov 2002



[1]Explanation of status change symbols for reassessed species
0 or 0+: Assessment based on a new status report or an update status report. A plus sign (+) indicates the report has an addendum or that the report has been modified.
1 or 1+: Species re-assessed using an existing status report. A plus sign (+) indicates the report has an addendum or that the report has been modified.
2: Species placed in a higher risk category after reassessment on the date shown.
3: Species placed in a lower risk category after reassessment on the date shown.
4: Species stays in the same category after reassessment on the date shown.
5: Species moved to the Data Deficient category from a risk category, or to a risk category from the Data Deficient category on the date shown.
6: Species that has been assigned to a different designatable unit than previously on the date shown.
7: Species moved to the Not at Risk category from a risk category on the date shown.
(no symbol) New species examined on the date shown.

Return to Table of Contents

Record of Status Reassessments

 

A short history is provided for each species that has been reassessed by COSEWIC, including date(s) of assessment and the status assigned. In October 1999 COSEWIC began using quantitative criteria to augment the earlier method of using status definitions to assign status. For species assessed since October 1999, the type of status report used as the basis for reassessment is indicated. Update reports focus on changes in the biological and threat information that has become
available since the last time a report was prepared. For some species, COSEWIC deemed the existing report suitable for reassessment.

Acadian Flycatcher
Designated Endangered in April 1994. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Allegheny Mountain Dusky Salamander
Designated Special Concern in April 1998. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

American Badger
Designated Not at Risk in April 1979. The original Canada-wide designation was deactivated in May 2000 when the American Badger was split according to subspecies.

American Badger jacksoni subspecies
The species was considered a single unit and designated Not at Risk in 1979. Each subspecies was given a separate designation in May 2000. The jacksoni subspecies was designated Endangered. Last assessment based on an update status report.

American Badger jeffersonii subspecies
The species was considered a single unit and designated Not at Risk in 1979. Each subspecies was given a separate designation in May 2000. The jeffersonii subspecies was designated Endangered. Last assessment based on an update status report.

American Badger taxus subspecies
Entire Canadian range was designated as Not at Risk in 1979. Each subspecies was given a separate designation in May 2000. The taxus subspecies was designated Not at Risk. Last assessment based on an update status report.

American Black Bear
Designated Not at Risk in April 1998 and in April 1999.

American Ginseng
Designated Threatened in April 1988. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

American Water-willow
Designated Threatened in April 1984. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

American White Pelican
Designated Threatened in April 1978. Status re-examined and designated Not at Risk in April 1987.

Anticosti Aster
Designated Threatened in April 1990. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Athabasca Thrift
Designated Threatened in April 1981. Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2002. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Atlantic Cod
Designated Special Concern in April 1998. Split into four populations in May 2003. The original designation was de-ctivated. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Atlantic Cod (Arctic population)
The species was considered a single unit and designated Special Concern in April 1998. When the species was split into separate populations in May 2003, the Arctic population was designated Special Concern. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Atlantic Cod (Laurentian North population)
The species was considered a single unit and designated Special Concern in April 1998. When the species was split into separate populations in May 2003, the Laurentian North population was designated Threatened. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Atlantic Cod (Maritimes population)
The species was considered a single unit and designated Special Concern in April 1998. When the species was split into separate populations in May 2003, the Maritimes population was designated Special Concern. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Atlantic Cod (Newfoundland and Labrador population)
The species was considered a single unit and designated Special Concern in April 1998. When the species was split into separate populations in May 2003, the Newfoundland and Labrador population was designated Endangered. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Atlantic Walrus (Northwest Atlantic population)
Extirpated around 1850. Designated Extirpated in April 1987. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Atlantic Whitefish
Designated Endangered in April 1984. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Aurora Trout
Designated Endangered in April 1987. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Baird's Sparrow
Designated Threatened in April 1989. Status re-examined and designated Not at Risk in April 1996.

Banded Killifish (Newfoundland population)
Designated Special Concern in April 1989. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Banff Longnose Dace
Extinct since 1986. Designated Extinct in April 1987. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Banff Springs Snail
Designated Threatened in April 1997. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Barn Owl
The species was considered a single unit and designated Special Concern in April 1984. In April 1999, the Western and Eastern populations were assessed separately. The original designation for the Canadian range of the Barn Owl was de-activated.

Barn Owl (Eastern population)
The species was considered a single unit and designated Special Concern in April 1984. In April 1999, the Western and Eastern populations were assessed separately. The Eastern population was designated Endangered. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Barn Owl (Western population)
The species was considered a single unit and designated Special Concern in April 1984. In April 1999, the Western and Eastern populations were assessed separately. The Western population was designated Special Concern. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Barren-ground Caribou (Dolphin and Union population)
The original designation considered a single unit that included Peary Caribou, Rangifer tarandus pearyi, and what is now known as the Dolphin and Union population of the Barren-ground Caribou, Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus. It was assigned a status of Threatened in April 1979. Split to allow designation of three separate populations in 1991: Banks Island (Endangered), High Arctic (Endangered) and Low Arctic (Threatened) populations. In May 2004, all three population designations were deactivated, and the Peary Caribou, Rangifer tarandus pearyi, was assessed separately from the Barren-ground Caribou (Dolphin and Union population), Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus. The Dolphin and Union population is comprised of a portion of the former "Low Arctic population", and it was designated Special Concern in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Bashful Bulrush
Designated Special Concern in April 1986. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Bearded Owl-clover
Designated Endangered in April 1998. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Beluga Whale (Cumberland Sound population)
The Southeast Baffin Island-Cumberland Sound population was designated Endangered in April 1990. In May 2004, the structure of the population was redefined and named "Cumberland Sound population", and the Southeast Baffin Island animals were included as part of the Western Hudson Bay population. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Beluga Whale (Eastern Beaufort Sea population)
Designated Not at Risk in April 1985 and in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Beluga Whale (Eastern High Arctic - Baffin Bay population)
Designated Special Concern in April 1992. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Beluga Whale (Eastern Hudson Bay population)
Designated Threatened in April 1988. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Beluga Whale (St. Lawrence Estuary population)
Designated Endangered in April 1983. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1997. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Beluga Whale (Ungava Bay population)
Designated Endangered in April 1988. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Beluga Whale (Western Hudson Bay population)
Designated Not at Risk in April 1993. The population was redefined in May 2004 to include those Southeast Baffin Island animals outside Cumberland Sound, previously considered part of the "Southeast Baffin Island-Cumberland Sound population" which is now called "Cumberland Sound population". Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Benthic Enos Lake Stickleback
Original designation (including both Benthic and Limnetic species) was Threatened in April 1988. Split into two species when re-examined in November 2002 and the Benthic Enos Lake Stickleback was designated Endangered. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Benthic Hadley Lake Stickleback
Extinct in 1999. Designated Extinct in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Benthic Paxton Lake Stickleback
Designated Threatened in April 1998. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1999. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Benthic Vananda Creek Stickleback
Designated Threatened in April 1999. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Bering Wolffish
Designated Special Concern in April 1989. Species considered in November 2002 and placed in the Data Deficient category. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Bigmouth Shiner
Designated Special Concern in April 1985. Status re-examined and designated Not at Risk in November 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Bird's-foot Violet
Designated Threatened in April 1990. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Black Tern
Designated Not at Risk in April 1988 and in April 1996.

Black-footed Ferret
Extirpated by 1974. Designated Extirpated in April 1978. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Blackstripe Topminnow
Designated Special Concern in April 1985. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2001. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Black-tailed Prairie Dog
Designated Special Concern in April 1978. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1988, April 1999 and November 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Blue Ash
Designated Threatened in April 1983. Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Blue Racer
Designated Endangered in April 1991. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Blue Walleye
Extinct since 1965. Designated Extinct in April 1985. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Blue Whale
The species was considered a single unit and designated Special Concern in April 1983. In May 2002, the species was split into two populations: Blue Whale (Atlantic population) and Blue Whale (Pacific population). The Atlantic population and the Pacific populations were both designated Endangered in May 2002. The original designation for Blue Whale was de-activated.

Blue Whale (Atlantic population)
The species was considered a single unit and designated Special Concern in April 1983. Split into two populations in May 2002. The Atlantic population was designated Endangered in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Blue Whale (Pacific population)
The species was considered a single unit and designated Special Concern in April 1983. Split into two populations in May 2002. The Pacific population was designated Endangered in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Bluehearts
Designated Threatened in April 1985. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in April 1998. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Blunt-lobed Woodsia
Designated Threatened in April 1994. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Bowhead Whale (Eastern and Western Arctic Populations)
Designated Endangered in April 1980. Split into two populations (Eastern Arctic and Western Arctic) to allow a separate designation for the Western Arctic population in April 1986. The original designation was de-activated.

Branched Bartonia
Designated Special Concern in April 1992. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Bridle Shiner
Designated Special Concern in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Brindled Madtom
Designated Special Concern in April 1985. Status re-examined and designated Not at Risk in May 2001. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Buffalograss
Designated Special Concern in April 1998. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Burrowing Owl
Designated Threatened in April 1979. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1991. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in April 1995. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Butler's Gartersnake
Designated Special Concern in April 1999. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Canada Lynx
Designated Not at Risk in April 1989 and in May 2001. Last assessment based on an update status report. Caribou dawsoni subspecies Extinct by the 1920's. Designated Extinct in April 1984. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Carmine Shiner
Designated Special Concern in April 1994. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Caspian Tern
Designated Special Concern in April 1978. Status re-examined and designated Not at Risk in April 1999.

Central Stoneroller
Designated Special Concern in 1985. Status re-examined and designated Not at Risk in 1998.

Cerulean Warbler
Designated Special Concern in April 1993. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Channel Darter
Designated Threatened in April 1993. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Chiselmouth
Species considered in April 1997 and placed in the Data Deficient category. Reexamined in May 2003 and designated Not at Risk. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Climbing Prairie Rose
Designated Special Concern in April 1986. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2002. Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in May 2003. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Coastal Giant Salamander
Designated Special Concern in April 1989. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Coastal Wood Fern
Designated Special Concern in April 1998. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Coeur d'Alene Salamander
Designated Special Concern in April 1998. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Colicroot
Designated Threatened in April 1988. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Common Hoptree
Designated Special Concern in April 1984. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Cooper's Hawk
Designated Special Concern in April 1983. Status re-examined and designated Not at Risk in April 1996.

Cougar (Eastern population)
Designated Endangered in April 1978. Species considered in April 1998 and placed in the Data Deficient category.

Cowichan Lake Lamprey
Designated Special Concern in April 1986. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1998. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Crooked-stem Aster
Designated Special Concern in April 1999. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2002. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Cucumber Tree
Designated Endangered in April 1984. Status re-examined and confirmed Endangered in April 1999 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Cultus Pygmy Sculpin
Designated Special Concern in April 1997. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Deepwater Cisco
Extinct since 1952. Designated Extinct in April 1988. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Deerberry
Designated Threatened in April 1994. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Deltoid Balsamroot
Designated in April 1996 as Endangered. Status re-examined and confirmed Endangered in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Dense Blazing Star
Designated Special Concern in April 1988. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2001. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Drooping Trillium
Designated Endangered in April 1996. Status re-assessed and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Dwarf Hackberry
Designated Special Concern in April 1985. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Dwarf Wedgemussel
Extirpated by 1968. Designated Extirpated in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Eastern Bluebird
Designated Special Concern in April 1984. Status re-examined and designated Not at Risk in April 1996.

Eastern Foxsnake
Designated Threatened in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Eastern Hog-nosed Snake
Designated Special Concern in April 1997. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Eastern Lilaeopsis
Designated Special Concern in April 1987 and in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Eastern Mole
Designated Special Concern in April 1980. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1998 and in November 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Eastern Mountain Avens
Designated Endangered in April 1986. Status re-examined and confirmed Endangered in April 1999 and May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Eastern Prairie Fringed-orchid
Designated Special Concern in April 1986. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Eastern Prickly Pear Cactus
Designated Endangered in April 1985. Status re-examined and confirmed Endangered in April 1998 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Eastern Ratsnake
Designated Threatened in April 1998. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Eastern Sand Darter
Designated Threatened in April 1994. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Eastern Wolf
Species considered in April 1999 and placed in the Data Deficient category. Reexamined in May 2001 and designated Special Concern. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Eelgrass Limpet
Extinct since 1929. Designated Extinct in April 1996. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Engelmann's Quillwort
Designated Endangered in April 1992. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2001. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Enos Lake Sticklebacks
Designated Threatened in April 1988. Split into two species when re-examined in November 2002: Benthic Enos Lake Stickleback and Limnetic Enos Lake Stickleback. The original designation was de-activated. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Ermine haidarum subspecies
Designated Special Concern in April 1984. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2001. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Eskimo Curlew
Designated Endangered in April 1978. Status re-examined and confirmed Endangered in May 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

False Hop Sedge
Designated Threatened in April 1997. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Fernald's Braya
Designated Threatened in April 1997. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Fernald's Milk-vetch
Designated Special Concern in April 1997. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Ferruginous Hawk
Designated Threatened in April 1980. Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in April 1995.

Flammulated Owl
Designated Special Concern in April 1988. Status re-examined and confirmed Special Concern in April 1999 and in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Fourhorn Sculpin (Freshwater form)
Designated Special Concern in April 1989. Species considered in November 2003 and placed in the Data Deficient category. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Fowler's Toad
Designated Special Concern in April 1986. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Fringed Bat
Designated Special Concern in April 1988. Species considered in May 2004 and placed in the Data Deficient category. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Frosted Elfin
Extirpated by 1988. Designated Extirpated in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Furbish's Lousewort
Designated Endangered in April 1980. Status re-examined and confirmed Endangered in April 1998 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Gattinger's Agalinis
Designated Endangered in April 1988. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1999 and in May 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report that was modified.

Giant Helleborine
Designated Threatened in April 1984. Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in April 1998.

Golden Crest
Designated Threatened in April 1987. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1999 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Golden Eagle
Designated Not at Risk in April 1987 and in April 1996.

Golden Paintbrush
Designated Threatened in April 1995. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Goldenseal
Designated Threatened in April 1991. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Gravel Chub
Last recorded in Thames River drainage, Ontario in 1958. Designated Endangered in April 1985. Status re-examined and designated Extirpated in April 1987. Status reexamined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Return to Table of Contents

Record of Status Reassessments (Continue)

Great Auk
Believed to be Extinct since 1844. Designated in April 1985 based on historic records only. Status report prepared and approved by COSEWIC in 1994. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Great Basin Spadefoot
Designated Special Concern in April 1998. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Great Grey Owl
Designated Special Concern in April 1979. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1990. Status re-examined and designated Not at Risk in April 1996.

Great Plains Toad
Designated Special Concern in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2002. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Greater Prairie-Chicken
Last reported in 1987. Designated Endangered in April 1978. Status re-examined and designated Extirpated in April 1990. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Greater Sage-Grouse phaios subspecies
Has not been reported since the 1960s. Designated Extirpated in April 1997. Status reexamined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Greater Sage-Grouse urophasianus subspecies
Given conditional designation of Threatened in April 1997. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in April 1998 based on a revised status report. Status reexamined confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Grey Fox
Designated Special Concern in April 1979. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Grey Whale (Atlantic population)
Extirpated before the end of the 1800s. Designated Extirpated in April 1987. Status reexamined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Grey Whale (Eastern North Pacific population)
Designated Not at Risk in April 1987. Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Grizzly Bear
The species was considered a single unit and designated Not at Risk in April 1979. Split into two populations in April 1991 (Prairie population and Northwestern population). The original designation for "Grizzly Bear" across was Canada de-activated.

Grizzly Bear (Northwestern population)
The species was considered a single unit and designated Not at Risk in April 1979. Split into two populations in April 1991 (Prairie population and Northwestern population). The Northwestern population was designated Special Concern in April 1991. Status was re-examined and confirmed in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Grizzly Bear (Prairie population)
The species was considered a single unit and designated Not at Risk in April 1979. Split into two populations in April 1991 (Prairie population and Northwestern population). The Prairie population was designated Extirpated in April 1991. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000 and in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Gulf of St. Lawrence Aster
Designated Special Concern in April 1989. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Gyrfalcon
Designated Not at Risk in April 1978 and in April 1987.

Hairy Prairie-clover
Designated Threatened in April 1998. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Harbour Porpoise (Northwest Atlantic population)
Designated Threatened in April 1990. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1991. Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Harbour Porpoise (Pacific Ocean population)
Species considered in April 1991 and placed in the Data Deficient category. Reexamined in November 2003 and designated Special Concern. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Harlequin Duck (Eastern population)
The Eastern population was designated Endangered in April 1990. Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in May 2001. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Heart-leaved Plantain
Designated Endangered in April 1985. Status re-examined and confirmed Endangered in April 1998 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Henslow's Sparrow
Designated Threatened in April 1984. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in April 1993. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Hoary Mountain-mint
Designated Endangered in April 1986. Status re-examined and confirmed Endangered in April 1998 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Hooded Warbler
Designated Threatened in April 1994. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Hotwater Physa
Designated Endangered in April 1998. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Humpback Whale (North Pacific population)
The "Western North Atlantic and North Pacific populations" were given a single designation of Threatened in April 1982. Split into two populations in April 1985 (Western North Atlantic population and North Pacific population). The North Pacific population designated Threatened in 1985. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Humpback Whale (Western North Atlantic and North Pacific populations)
The "Western North Atlantic and North Pacific populations" were given a single designation of Threatened in April 1982. Split into two populations in April 1985 (Western North Atlantic population and North Pacific population). The original designation was de-activated.

Humpback Whale (Western North Atlantic population)
The "Western North Atlantic and North Pacific populations" were given a single designation of Threatened in April 1982. Split into two populations in April 1985 (Western North Atlantic population and North Pacific population). Western North Atlantic population designated Special Concern in April 1985. Status re-examined and designated Not at Risk in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Illinois Tick-trefoil
No site records since 1888. Designated Extirpated in April 1991. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Island Marble
Extirpated by 1910. Designated Extirpated in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Ivory Gull
Designated Special Concern in April 1979. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1996 and in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Juniper Sedge
Designated Endangered in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Karner Blue
Has not been observed since 1991. Designated Extirpated in April 1997. Status reexamined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Keen's Long-eared Bat
Designated Special Concern in April 1988. Species considered in November 2003 and placed in the Data Deficient category. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Kentucky Coffee-tree
Designated Threatened in April 1983. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Killer Whale (North Pacific resident populations)
Designated Threatened in April 1999. The designation of the Killer Whale (North Pacific resident populations) was de-activated in November 2001 when it was split into two populations: Killer Whale (Northeast Pacific northern resident population) and Killer Whale (Northeast Pacific southern resident population). Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Killer Whale (Northeast Pacific northern resident population)
North Pacific resident populations designated Threatened in April 1999. Split into two populations in November 2001. The Northeast Pacific northern resident population was designated Threatened in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Killer Whale (Northeast Pacific southern resident population)
North Pacific resident populations designated Threatened in April 1999. Split into two populations in November 2001. The Northeast Pacific southern resident population was designated Endangered in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Killer Whale (Northeast Pacific transient population)
Designated Special Concern in April 1999. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Killer Whale (Northwest Atlantic / Eastern Arctic populations)
Species considered in April 1999 and in November 2001, and placed in the Data Deficient category. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

King Rail
Designated Special Concern in April 1985. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in April 1994. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Kirtland's Warbler
Designated Endangered in April 1979. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1999 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Labrador Duck
Believed to be Extinct since 1875. Designated in April 1985 based on historic records only. Status report prepared and approved by COSEWIC in 1994. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Lake Chubsucker
Designated Special Concern in April 1994. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Lake Utopia Dwarf Smelt
Designated Threatened in April 1998. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Lake Whitefish (Mira River population)
Species considered in April 1999 and in November 2000, and placed in the Data Deficient category. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Large Whorled Pogonia
Designated Endangered in April 1986. Status re-examined and confirmed Endangered in April 1998 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Least Bittern
Designated Special Concern in April 1988. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1999. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Leatherback Seaturtle
Designated Endangered in April 1981. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2001. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Lewis's Woodpecker
Designated Special Concern in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Limnetic Enos Lake Stickleback
Original designation (including both Benthic and Limnetic species) was Threatened in April 1988. Split into two species when re-examined in November 2002 and the Limnetic Enos Lake Stickleback was designated Endangered. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Limnetic Hadley Lake Stickleback
Extinct in 1999. Designated Extinct in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Limnetic Paxton Lake Stickleback
Designated Threatened in April 1998. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1999. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Limnetic Vananda Creek Stickleback
Designated Threatened in April 1999. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Loggerhead Shrike
The species was considered a single unit and designated Threatened in April 1986. The excubitorides and the migrans subspecies were designated separately in April 1991, and the original designation was de-activated.

Loggerhead Shrike excubitorides subspecies
The species was considered a single unit and designated Threatened in April 1986. Split according to subspecies in April 1991. The excubitorides subspecies retained the original Threatened designation from April 1986. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Loggerhead Shrike migrans subspecies
The species was considered a single unit and designated Threatened in April 1986. Split according to subspecies in April 1991. The migrans subspecies was designated Endangered in April 1991. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Long-billed Curlew
Designated Special Concern in April 1992. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Longjaw Cisco
Extinct since 1975. Designated Extinct in April 1985. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Designation de-activated in May 2002 because it was concluded that this species is a synonym of the Shortjaw Cisco, Coregonus zenithicus,
which was designated Threatened in 1987. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Long's Braya
Designated Endangered in April 1997. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Louisiana Waterthrush
Designated Special Concern in April 1991. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1996.

Mackenzie Hairgrass
Designated Special Concern in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Marbled Murrelet
Designated Threatened in April 1990. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Margined Madtom
Designated Threatened in April 1989. Species considered in May 2002 and placed in the Data Deficient category. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Maritime Ringlet
Designated Endangered in April 1997. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Massasauga
Designated Threatened in April 1991. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Mexican Mosquito-fern
Designated Threatened in April 1984. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1998 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Monarch
Designated Special Concern in April 1997. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Morrison Creek Lamprey
Designated Threatened in April 1999. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Mountain Beaver
Designated Not at Risk in April 1984. Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Mountain Plover
Designated Endangered in April 1987. Status re-examined and confirmed November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Narwhal
Designated Not at Risk in April 1986 and in April 1987.

New Jersey Rush
Designated Special Concern in April 1992. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Newfoundland Marten
Designated Not at Risk in April 1979. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in April 1986. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in April 1996. Status reexamined and confirmed Endangered in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Nodding Pogonia
Designated Threatened in April 1988. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Nooksack Dace
Designated Endangered in April 1996. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

North Atlantic Right Whale
The Right Whale was considered a single species and designated Endangered in 1980. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1985 and in April 1990. Split into two species in May 2003 to allow a separate designation of the North Atlantic Right Whale. North Atlantic Right Whale was designated Endangered in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.

North Pacific Right Whale
The Right Whale was considered a single species and designated Endangered in 1980. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1985 and in April 1990. Split into two species in May 2003. North Pacific Right Whale was not re-evaluated, but retains the Endangered status of the original Right Whale. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Northern Abalone
Designated Threatened in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Northern Bobwhite
Designated Endangered in April 1994. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Northern Bottlenose Whale
The Northern Bottlenose Whale was given a single designation of Not at Risk in April 1993. Split into two populations in April 1996 to allow a separate designation of the Northern Bottlenose Whale (Scotian Shelf population). Northern Bottlenose (Davis Strait population) was not re-evaluated, but retains the Not at Risk designation of the original Northern Bottlenose Whale, and the latter was de-activated.

Northern Bottlenose Whale (Scotian Shelf population)
The Northern Bottlenose Whale was given a single designation of Not at Risk in April 1993. Split into two populations in April 1996 to allow a separate designation of the Northern Bottlenose Whale (Scotian Shelf population). Scotian Shelf population designated Special Concern in April 1996. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in November 2002. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Northern Cricket Frog
Designated Endangered in April 1990. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2001. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Northern Goshawk laingi subspecies
Designated Special Concern in April 1995. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Northern Leopard Frog (Southern Mountain population)
Designated Endangered in April 1998. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Northern Leopard Frog (Western Boreal/Prairie populations)
Designated Special Concern in April 1998. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2002. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Northern Madtom
Species considered in April 1993 and placed in the Data Deficient category. Re-examined in April 1998 and designated Special Concern. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in November 2002. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Northern Riffleshell
Designated Endangered in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Nuttall's Cottontail pinetis subspecies
Designated Not at Risk in 1991 and in April 1994.

Oregon Spotted Frog
Designated Endangered in an emergency assessment in November 1999. Status reexamined and confirmed in May 2000. Assessment based on a new status report.

Pacific Sardine
Designated Special Concern in April 1987. Status re-examined and designated Not at Risk in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Pacific Water Shrew
Designated Threatened in April 1994. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Paddlefish
Disappeared from Canada in approximately 1917. Designated Extirpated in April 1987. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Pallid Bat
Designated Special Concern in April 1988. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Passenger Pigeon
Believed to be Extinct since 1914. Designated in April 1985 based on historic records only. Status report prepared and approved by COSEWIC in 1994. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Peary Caribou
The original designation considered a single unit that included Peary Caribou, Rangifer tarandus pearyi, and what is now known as the Dolphin and Union population of the Barren-ground Caribou, Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus. It was assigned a status of Threatened in April 1979. Split to allow designation of three separate populations in 1991: Banks Island (Endangered), High Arctic (Endangered) and Low Arctic (Threatened) populations. In May 2004 all three population designations were de-activated, and the Peary Caribou, Rangifer tarandus pearyi, was assessed separately from the Barrenground Caribou (Dolphin and Union population), Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus. The subspecies pearyi is comprised of a portion of the former "Low Arctic population", and all of the former "High Arctic" and "Banks Island" populations, and it was designated Endangered in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Peary Caribou [original designation]
The original designation considered a single unit that included Peary Caribou, Rangifer tarandus pearyi, and what is now known as the Dolphin and Union population of the Barren-ground Caribou, Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus. It was assigned a status of Threatened in April 1979. Split into three separate populations in April 1991: Banks Island, High Arctic and Low Arctic populations. The original designation was deactivated. In May 2004, all three population designations were de-activated, and the Peary Caribou, Rangifer tarandus pearyi, was assessed separately from the Barrenground Caribou (Dolphin and Union population), Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus.

Peary Caribou (Banks Island population)
The original designation considered a single unit that included Peary Caribou, Rangifer tarandus pearyi, and what is now known as the Dolphin and Union population of the Barren-ground Caribou, Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus. It was assigned a status of Threatened in April 1979. Split to allow designation of three separate populations in 1991: Banks Island, High Arctic and Low Arctic populations. The Banks Island population was designated Endangered in April 1991. In May 2004, all three population designations were de-activated, and the Peary Caribou, Rangifer tarandus pearyi, was assessed separately from the Barren-ground Caribou (Dolphin and Union population), Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus. The former Banks Island population is contained within the subspecies pearyi.

Peary Caribou (High Arctic population)
The original designation considered a single unit that included Peary Caribou, Rangifer tarandus pearyi, and what is now known as the Dolphin and Union population of the Barren-ground Caribou, Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus. It was assigned a status of Threatened in April 1979. Split to allow designation of three separate populations in 1991: Banks Island, High Arctic and Low Arctic populations. The High Arctic population of the Peary Caribou was designated Endangered in April 1991. In May 2004, all three population designations were de-activated, and the Peary Caribou, Rangifer tarandus
pearyi, was assessed separately from the Barren-ground Caribou (Dolphin and Union population), Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus. The former High Arctic population is contained within the subspecies pearyi.

Peary Caribou (Low Arctic population)
The original designation considered a single unit that included Peary Caribou, Rangifer tarandus pearyi, and what is now known as the Dolphin and Union population of the Barren-ground Caribou, Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus. It was assigned a status of Threatened in April 1979. Split to allow designation of three separate populations in 1991: Banks Island, High Arctic and Low Arctic populations. The Low Arctic population was designated Threatened in April 1991. In May 2004, all three population designations were de-activated, and the Peary Caribou, Rangifer tarandus pearyi, was assessed separately from the Barren-ground Caribou (Dolphin and Union population), Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus. The former Low Arctic population is contained partly within the subspecies pearyi and partly within the Barren-ground Caribou (Dolphin and Union
population).

Peregrine Falcon anatum subspecies
Designated Endangered in April 1978. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Peregrine Falcon pealei subspecies
Designated Special Concern in April 1978. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1999 and in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Peregrine Falcon tundrius subspecies
Designated Threatened in April 1978. Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in April 1992.

Phantom Orchid
Designated Special Concern in April 1992. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Pighead Prickleback
Designated Special Concern in April 1989. Species considered in May 2003 and placed in the Data Deficient category. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Pigmy Short-horned Lizard (British Columbia population)
Last reported in 1898. Designated Extirpated in April 1992. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Pink Coreopsis
Designated Endangered in April 1984. Status re-examined and confirmed Endangered in April 1999 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Pink Milkwort
Designated Endangered in April 1984. Status re-examined and confirmed Endangered in April 1998 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Piping Plover
The species was considered a single unit and designated Threatened in April 1978. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in April 1985. In May 2001, the species was re-examined and split into two groups according to subspecies. The melodus subspecies and circumcinctus subspecies were each designated Endangered in May 2001. The original designation was de-activated.

Piping Plover circumcinctus subspecies
The species was considered a single unit and designated Threatened in April 1978. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in April 1985. In May 2001, the species was re-examined and split into two groups according to subspecies. The circumcinctus subspecies was designated Endangered in May 2001. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Piping Plover melodus subspecies
The species was considered a single unit and designated Threatened in April 1978. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in April 1985. In May 2001, the species was re-examined and split into two groups according to subspecies. The melodus subspecies was designated Endangered in May 2001. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Pitcher's Thistle
Designated Threatened in April 1988. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Return to Table of Contents

Record of Status Reassessments (Continue)

Pixie Poacher
Species considered in April 1991 and placed in the Data Deficient category. Reexamined and designation de-activated in November 2001. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Plains Pocket Gopher
Designated Special Concern in April 1979. Status re-examined and designated Not at Risk in April 1998.

Plymouth Gentian
Designated Threatened in April 1984. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1999 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Polar Bear
Designated Not at Risk in April 1986. Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in April 1991. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1999 and in November 2002. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Prairie Falcon
Designated Not at Risk in April 1978, April 1982 and April 1996.

Prairie Long-tailed Weasel
Designated Threatened in April 1982. Status re-examined and designated Not at Risk in April 1993.

Prairie Lupine
Designated Endangered in April 1996. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Prairie Skink
Designated Special Concern in April 1989. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Prairie Warbler
Designated Special Concern in April 1985. Status re-examined and designated Not at Risk in April 1999.

Prothonotary Warbler
Designated Special Concern in April 1984. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in April 1996. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Pugnose Minnow
Designated Special Concern in April 1985. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Pugnose Shiner
Designated Special Concern in April 1985. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in November 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Purple Twayblade
Designated Threatened in April 1989. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report that was modified.

Queen Snake
Designated Threatened in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Rayed Bean
Designated Endangered in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Red Mulberry
Designated Threatened in April 1987. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Red-legged Frog
Designated Special Concern in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2002. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Redroot
Designated Threatened in April 1994. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Red-shouldered Hawk
Designated Special Concern in April 1983. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1996.

Right Whale
The Right Whale was considered a single species and designated Endangered in 1980. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1985 and in April 1990. Split into two species in May 2003 to allow a separate designation of the North Atlantic Right Whale. North Pacific Right Whale was not re-evaluated, but retains the Endangered status of the original Right Whale. The original designation was de-activated. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Rigid Apple Moss
Designated Threatened in April 1997. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

River Redhorse
Designated Special Concern in April 1983. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1987.

Roseate Tern
Designated Threatened in April 1986. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in April 1999. Endangered status re-examined and confirmed in October 1999. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Ross's Gull
Designated Special Concern in April 1981. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1996. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Round-leaved Greenbrier (Great Lakes Plains population)
Designated Threatened in April 1994. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Sage Thrasher
Designated Endangered in April 1992. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Salish Sucker
Designated Endangered in April 1986. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Savannah Sparrow princeps subspecies
Designated Special Concern in April 1979. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Scarlet Ammannia
Designated Endangered in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Sea Mink
Believed Extinct since 1894. Designated Extinct in April 1986. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Sea Otter
Designated Endangered in April 1978. Status re-examined and confirmed Endangered in April 1986. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in April 1996. Status reexamined and confirmed Threatened in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Seaside Birds-foot Lotus
Designated Endangered in April 1996. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Seaside Centipede
Designated Endangered in April 1996. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Sharp-shinned Hawk
Designated Not at Risk in April 1986 and in April 1997.

Sharp-tailed Snake
Designated Endangered in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in October 1999. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Shorthead Sculpin
Designated Threatened in April 1984. Status re-examined and confirmed Threatened in May 2001. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Shortjaw Cisco
Designated Threatened in April 1987. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Showy Goldenrod
Designated Endangered in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Shumard Oak
Designated Special Concern in April 1984. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1999.

Silver Chub
Designated Special Concern in April 1985. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2001. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Silver Shiner
Designated Special Concern in April 1983. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1987.

Skinner's Agalinis
Designated Endangered in April 1988. Status re-examined and confirmed Endangered in April 1999 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Slender Bush-clover
Designated Endangered in April 1986. Status re-examined and confirmed Endangered in April 1999 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Slender Mouse-ear-cress
Designated Endangered in April 1992. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report with an addendum.

Small White Lady's-slipper
Designated Endangered in April 1981. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1999 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Small Whorled Pogonia
Designated Endangered in April 1982. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1998 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Small-flowered Lipocarpha
Designated Threatened in April 1992. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in November 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Small-flowered Sand-verbena
Designated Threatened in April 1992. Re-examined and designated Endangered in November 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Small-mouthed Salamander
Designated Special Concern in April 1991. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Soapweed
Designated Special Concern in April 1985. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Sockeye Salmon (Cultus population)
Designated Endangered in an emergency assessment in October 2002. Status reexamined and confirmed in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.

Sockeye Salmon (Sakinaw population)
Designated Endangered in an emergency assessment in October 2002. Status reexamined and confirmed in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.

Southern Maidenhair Fern
Designated Endangered in April 1984. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1998 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Speckled Dace
Designated Special Concern in April 1980. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in November 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Spiny Softshell
Designated Threatened in April 1991. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Spotted Bat
Designated Special Concern in April 1988. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Spotted Gar
Designated Special Concern in April 1983. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1994. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Spotted Owl caurina subspecies
Designated Endangered in April 1986. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1999 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Spotted Sucker
Designated Special Concern in April 1983. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1994 and in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Spotted Turtle
Designated Special Concern in April 1991. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Spotted Wintergreen
Designated Endangered in April 1987. Status re-examined and confirmed Endangered in April 1998 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Sprague's Pipit
Designated Threatened in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Spring Blue-eyed Mary
No site records since 1954. Designated Extirpated in April 1987. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Spring Salamander
Designated Special Concern in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2002. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Steller Sea Lion
Designated Not at Risk in April 1987. Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in November 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Sweet Pepperbush
Designated Threatened in April 1986. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1998. Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in May 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report that was modified.

Swift Fox
Last seen in Saskatchewan in 1928. Designated Extirpated in April 1978. Status reexamined and designated Endangered in April 1998 after successful re-introductions. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Thread-leaved Sundew
Designated Endangered in April 1991. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2001. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Tiny Cryptanthe
Designated Endangered in April 1998. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Toothcup
Designated Endangered in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Townsend's Mole
Designated Threatened in April 1996. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Trumpeter Swan
Designated Special Concern in April 1978. Status re-examined and designated Not at Risk in April 1996.

Tuberous Indian-plantain
Designated Special Concern in April 1988. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1999 and in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report that was modified.

Tyrrell's Willow
Designated Threatened in April 1981. Status re-examined and designated Not at Risk in April 1999.

Van Brunt's Jacob's-ladder
Designated Threatened in April 1994. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Vancouver Island Marmot
Designated Endangered in April 1978. Status re-examined and confirmed Endangered in April 1997 and in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Victorin's Gentian
Designated Special Concern in April 1987. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Victorin's Water-hemlock
Designated Special Concern in April 1987. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2004. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Virginia Goat's-rue
Designated Threatened in April 1996. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Warmouth
Designated Special Concern in April 1994. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Water-pennywort
Designated Endangered in April 1985. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Water-plantain Buttercup
Designated Endangered in April 1996. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Wavy-rayed Lampmussel
Designated Endangered in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in October 1999. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Western Blue-flag
Designated Threatened in April 1990. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Western Prairie Fringed-orchid
Designated Endangered in April 1993. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Western Screech-Owl
The species was considered a single unit and placed in the Data Deficient category in April 1995. Re-examined in May 2002 and split into two groups according to subspecies. The kennicottii subspecies was designated Special Concern and the
macfarlanei subspecies was designated Threatened in May 2002. The original designation was de-activated. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Western Screech-Owl kennicottii subspecies
Species considered in April 1995 and placed in the Data Deficient category. It was split according to subspecies in May 2002. The kennicottii subspecies was designated Special Concern in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Western Screech-Owl macfarlanei subspecies
Species considered in April 1995 and placed in the Data Deficient category. It was split according to subspecies in May 2002. The macfarlanei subspecies was designated Endangered in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Western Silvery Aster
Designated Special Concern in 1988. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Western Silvery Minnow
Designated Special Concern in April 1997. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Western Spiderwort
Designated Threatened in April 1992. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

White Prairie Gentian
Designated Endangered in April 1991. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2001. Last assessment based on an update status report.

White Sturgeon
Designated Special Concern in April 1990. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in November 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.

White Wood Aster
Designated Threatened in April 1995. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

White-headed Woodpecker
Designated Threatened in April 1992. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

White-top Aster
Designated Threatened in April 1996. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Whooping Crane
Designated Endangered in April 1978. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Wild Hyacinth
Designated Special Concern in April 1990. Re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Willowleaf Aster
Designated Special Concern in April 1999. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in May 2003. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Wolverine
The species was considered a single unit and designated Special Concern in April 1982. Split into two populations in April 1989 (Western and Eastern populations). The original designation was de-activated.

Wolverine (Eastern population)
The species was considered a single unit and designated Special Concern in April 1982. Split into two populations in April 1989 (Western population and Eastern population). The Eastern population was designated Endangered in April 1989. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Wolverine (Western population)
The species was considered a single unit and designated Special Concern in April 1982. Split into two populations in April 1989 (Western and Eastern populations). The Western population was designated Special Concern in April 1989. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Wood Bison
Designated Endangered in April 1978. Status re-examined and designated Threatened in April 1988. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Woodland Caribou (Atlantic-Gaspésie population)
Atlantic-Gaspésie population designated Threatened in April 1984. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in May 2000. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Woodland Caribou (Boreal population)
The Boreal population was designated Threatened in May 2000. This newly-defined population is comprised of a portion of the de-activated "Western population" and all of the de-activated "Labrador-Ungava population". Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Woodland Caribou (Labrador-Ungava population)
Labrador-Ungava population was designated Not at Risk in April 1984. The designation of the Labrador-Ungava population was de-activated in May 2000. The former Labrador-Ungava population is contained within the Boreal population.

Woodland Caribou (Newfoundland population)
Newfoundland population was designated Not at Risk in April 1984. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000 and in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Woodland Caribou (Northern Mountain population)
The Northern Mountain population was designated Not at Risk in May 2000. This population was formerly designated as part of the "Western population" (now deactivated). Status re-examined and designated Special Concern in May 2002. Last
assessment based on an update status report.

Woodland Caribou (Southern Mountain population)
The Southern Mountain population was designated Threatened in May 2000. This population was formerly designated as part of the "Western population" (now deactivated). Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2002. Last assessment based on
an update status report.

Woodland Caribou (Western population)
The Western population was designated Special Concern in April 1984. The designation of the Western population was de-activated in May 2000. The former Western population is contained within the following newly designated populations: Northern Mountain, Southern Mountain and Boreal.

Woodland Vole
Designated Special Concern in April 1998.Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Wood-poppy
Designated Endangered in April 1993. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.

Yellow Montane Violet
Designated Threatened in April 1995. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Yellow Rail
Designated Special Concern in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2001. Last assessment based on an existing status report.

Yellow-breasted Chat auricollis subspecies (British Columbia population)
The British Columbia population of the auricollis subspecies was designated Threatened in April 1994. Status re-examined and designated Endangered in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Yellow-breasted Chat auricollis subspecies (Prairie population)
The Prairie population of the auricollis subspecies was designated Not at Risk in April 1994 and in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Yellow-breasted Chat virens subspecies
Designated Special Concern in April 1994. Status re-examined and confirmed in November 2000. Last assessment based on an update status report.

Return to Table of Contents

Record of Name Changes

 

Common and scientific names (including population names, where applicable) previously used by COSEWIC, and other synonyms.
Previous Name(s) or Synonym      Current Common Name or Scientific Name (population)
Abronia micrantha      Tripterocalyx micranthus
Acadian Whitefish      Atlantic Whitefish
Acris crepitans blanchardi      Acris crepitans
American Marten (Newfoundland population)      Newfoundland Marten
Anatum Peregrine Falcon      Peregrine Falcon anatum subspecies
Apple Moss      Rigid Apple Moss
Ascaphus truei (Pacific Coast population)      Ascaphus truei
Ascaphus truei (Southern Mountain population)      Ascaphus montanus
Asplenium scolopendrium var. americanum      Asplenium scolopendrium
Aster anticostensis      Symphyotrichum anticostense
Aster curtus      Sericocarpus rigidus
Aster divaricatus      Eurybia divaricata
Aster laurentianus      Symphyotrichum laurentianum
Aster praealtus      Symphyotrichum praealtum
Aster prenanthoides      Symphyotrichum prenanthoides
Aster shortii      Symphyotrichum shortii
Aster subulatus var. obtusifolius      Symphyotrichum subulatum (Bathurst population)
Aster yukonensis      Symphyotrichum yukonense
Bathurst Aster      Bathurst Aster (Bathurst population)
Beluga Whale (Beaufort Sea / Arctic Ocean population)      Beluga Whale (Eastern Beaufort Sea population)
Beluga Whale (Southeast Baffin Island-Cumberland Sound population)      Beluga Whale (Cumberland Sound population)
Beluga Whale (St. Lawrence River population)      Beluga Whale (St. Lawrence Estuary population)
Benthic Texada Island Stickleback      Benthic Paxton Lake Stickleback
Black Rat Snake      Eastern Ratsnake
Black Ratsnake      Eastern Ratsnake
Blackline Prickleback      Pighead Prickleback
Blanchard's Cricket Frog      Northern Cricket Frog
Blue-eyed Mary      Spring Blue-eyed Mary
Bowl Limpet      Eelgrass Limpet
Bufo woodhousii fowleri      Bufo fowleri
Butler's Garter Snake      Butler's Gartersnake
Cacalia plantaginea      Arnoglossum plantagineum
Centrocercus urophasianus phaios (British Columbia population)      Centrocercus urophasianus phaios
Centrocercus urophasianus urophasianus (Prairie population)      Centrocercus urophasianus urophasianus
Charlotte Unarmoured Sticklebacks      Charlotte Unarmoured Stickleback
Cimicifuga elata      Actaea elata
Clemmys insculpta      Glyptemys insculpta
Clemmys marmorata      Actinemys marmorata
Coeur d'Alène Salamander      Coeur d'Alene Salamander
Common Hop-tree      Common Hoptree
Common Watersnake      Northern Watersnake
Coregonus canadensis      Coregonus huntsmani
Delphinapterus leucas (Beaufort Sea / Arctic Ocean population)  Delphinapterus leucas (Eastern Beaufort Sea population)
Delphinapterus leucas (Southeast Baffin Island-Cumberland Sound population)      Delphinapterus leucas (Cumberland Sound population)
Delphinapterus leucas (St. Lawrence River population)      Delphinapterus leucas (St. Lawrence Estuary population)
Eastern Fox Snake      Eastern Foxsnake
Eastern Grey Wolf      Eastern Wolf
Eastern Hognosed Snake      Eastern Hog-nosed Snake
Eastern Loggerhead Shrike      Loggerhead Shrike migrans subspecies
Eastern Massasauga      Massasauga
Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnake      Massasauga
Eastern Milksnake      Milksnake
Eastern Prairie Fringed Orchid      Eastern Prairie Fringed-orchid
Eastern Short-horned Lizard      Greater Short-horned Lizard
Eastern Spiny Softshell Turtle      Spiny Softshell
Eastern Yellow-breasted Chat      Yellow-breasted Chat virens subspecies
Elaphe obsoleta obsoleta      Elaphe obsoleta
Elaphe vulpina gloydi      Elaphe gloydi
Elgaria coerulea principis      Elgaria coerulea
Emydoidea blandingi      Emydoidea blandingii (Nova Scotia population)
Erigeron philadelphicus ssp. provancheri      Erigeron philadelphicus var. provancheri
Ermine (Queen Charlotte Islands population)      Ermine haidarum subspecies
Eschrichtius robustus (Northeast Pacific population)      Eschrichtius robustus (Eastern North Pacific population)
Eumeces septentrionalis septentrionalis      Eumeces septentrionalis
Few-flowered Club-rush      Bashful Bulrush
Gasterosteus aculeatus      Gasterosteus sp.
Gentiana victorinii      Gentianopsis procera ssp. macounii var. victorinii
Gentianopsis victorinii      Gentianopsis procera ssp. macounii var. victorinii
Goat's-rue      Virginia Goat's-rue
Great Basin Gopher Snake      Great Basin Gophersnake
Great Basin Spadefoot Toad      Great Basin Spadefoot
Greater Sandhill Crane      Sandhill Crane tabida subspecies
Grey Whale (Northeast Pacific population)      Grey Whale (Eastern North Pacific population)
Grey Wolf      Arctic Grey Wolf
Grey Wolf      Southern Grey Wolf
Grey Wolf      Eastern Wolf
Grey Wolf      Northern Grey Wolf
Grizzly Bear [no population name]      Grizzly Bear (Northwestern population)
Gymnocladus dioica      Gymnocladus dioicus
Haplopappus macleanii      Stenotus borealis
Harbour Seal      Harbour Seal Atlantic subspecies
Harbour Seal      Harbour Seal Pacific subspecies
Harbour Seal (Lac des Loups Marins landlocked population)      Harbour Seal Lacs des Loups Marins subspecies
Hubb's Beaked Whale      Hubbs' Beaked Whale
Hyperoodon ampullatus (Gully population)      Hyperoodon ampullatus (Scotian Shelf population)
Icteria virens virens (Eastern population)      Icteria virens virens
Incisalia irus      Callophrys [Incisalia] irus
"Ipswich" Savannah Sparrow      Savannah Sparrow princeps subspecies
Isopyrum biternatum      Enemion biternatum
Killer Whale (North Pacific "resident" populations)      Killer Whale (North Pacific resident populations)
Lake Erie Water Snake      Lake Erie Watersnake
Lake Lamprey      Cowichan Lake Lamprey
Lake Simcoe Whitefish      Lake Whitefish (Lake Simcoe population)
Lanius ludovicianus excubitorides (Prairie population)      Lanius ludovicianus excubitorides
Lanius ludovicianus migrans (Eastern population)      Lanius ludovicianus migrans
Leatherback Turtle      Leatherback Seaturtle
Lilaeopsis Eastern Lilaeopsis
Limnetic Texada Island Stickleback      Limnetic Paxton Lake Stickleback
Loggerhead Shrike (Eastern population)      Loggerhead Shrike migrans subspecies
Loggerhead Shrike (Prairie population)      Loggerhead Shrike excubitorides subspecies
Long-tailed Weasel (Prairie population)      Prairie Long-tailed Weasel
Lottia alveus      Lottia alveus alveus
Lynx  Canada Lynx
MacLean's Goldenweed      Northern Mock Goldenweed
Martes americana atrata (Newfoundland population)      Martes americana atrata
Mexican Mosquito Fern      Mexican Mosquito-fern
Mira River Whitefish      Lake Whitefish (Mira River population)
Mountain Dusky Salamander      Allegheny Mountain Dusky Salamander
Mustela erminea haidarum (Queen Charlotte Islands population)      Mustela erminea haidarum
Mustela frenata longicauda (Prairie population)      Mustela frenata longicauda
Night Snake      Nightsnake
North Sea Beaked Whale      Sowerby's Beaked Whale
Northern Bottlenose Whale      Northern Bottlenose Whale (Davis Strait population)
Northern Bottlenose Whale (Gully population)      Northern Bottlenose Whale (Scotian Shelf population)
Northern Goshawk      Northern Goshawk atricapillus subspecies
Northern Leopard Frog (Prairie population)      Northern Leopard Frog (Western Boreal/Prairie populations)
Northern Prairie Skink      Prairie Skink
Northern Red-legged Frog      Red-legged Frog
Northern Ribbonsnake (Atlantic population)      Eastern Ribbonsnake (Atlantic population)
Northern Ribbonsnake (Great Lakes population)      Eastern Ribbonsnake (Great Lakes population)
Northern Spotted Owl      Spotted Owl caurina subspecies
Northwestern Alligator Lizard      Northern Alligator Lizard
Notropis rubellus (Eastern population)      Notropis rubellus
Notropis rubellus (Manitoba population)      Notropis percobromus
Nuttall's Cottontail (British Columbia population)      Nuttall's Cottontail nuttallii subspecies
Nuttall's Cottontail (Prairie population)      Nuttall's Cottontail pinetis subspecies
Nyctea scandiaca      Bubo scandiaca
Oncorhynchus nerka (Cultus Lake population)      Oncorhynchus nerka (Cultus population)
Oncorhynchus nerka (Sakinaw Lake population)      Oncorhynchus nerka (Sakinaw population)
Orcinus orca (North Pacific "resident" populations)      Orcinus orca (North Pacific resident populations)
Otus asio      Megascops asio
Otus kennicottii      Megascops kennicottii
Otus kennicottii kennicottii      Megascops kennicottii kennicottii
Otus kennicottii macfarlanei      Megascops kennicottii macfarlanei
Pacific Giant Salamander      Coastal Giant Salamander
Pacific Gopher Snake      Pacific Gophersnake
Pacific Great Blue Heron      Great Blue Heron fannini subspecies
Panax quinquefolium      Panax quinquefolius
Peale's Peregrine Falcon      Peregrine Falcon pealei subspecies
Phoca vitulina mellonae (Lac des Loups Marins landlocked population)      Phoca vitulina mellonae
Phrynosoma douglassii brevirostre      Phrynosoma hernandesi
Phrynosoma douglassii douglassii (British Columbia population)      Phrynosoma douglasii (British Columbia population)
Pink Rush      Rush Pink
Plains Spadefoot Toad      Plains Spadefoot
Polemonium van-bruntiae      Polemonium vanbruntiae
Prairie Loggerhead Shrike      Loggerhead Shrike excubitorides subspecies
Pygmy Short-horned Lizard (British Columbia population)      Pigmy Short-horned Lizard (British Columbia population)
Queen Charlotte Goshawk      Northern Goshawk laingi subspecies
Rana pipiens (Prairie population)      Rana pipiens (Western Boreal/Prairie populations)
Rangifer tarandus dawsoni (Queen Charlotte Islands population)      Rangifer tarandus dawsoni
Reithrodontomys megalotis dychei (Prairie population)      Reithrodontomys megalotis dychei
Reithrodontomys megalotis megalotis (British Columbia population)      Reithrodontomys megalotis megalotis
Ross' Gull      Ross's Gull
Rosyface Shiner (Eastern population)      Rosyface Shiner
Rosyface Shiner (Manitoba population)      Carmine Shiner
Sage Grouse (British Columbia population)      Greater Sage-Grouse phaios subspecies
Sage Grouse (Prairie population)      Greater Sage-Grouse urophasianus subspecies
Salamander Mussel      Mudpuppy Mussel
Sand Verbena      Small-flowered Sand-verbena
Sand Verbena Moth      Sand-verbena Moth
Scirpus verecundus      Trichophorum planifolium
Simpsonais ambigua      Simpsonaias ambigua
Sistrurus catenatus catenatus      Sistrurus catenatus
Slender Wooly-heads      Slender Woolly-heads
Smallmouth Salamander      Small-mouthed Salamander
Sockeye Salmon (Cultus Lake population)      Sockeye Salmon (Cultus population)
Sockeye Salmon (Sakinaw Lake population)      Sockeye Salmon (Sakinaw population)
Solidago speciosa var. rigidiuscula      Solidago speciosa
Speotyto cunicularia      Athene cunicularia
Spiny Softshell Turtle      Spiny Softshell
Spotted Owl      Spotted Owl caurina subspecies
Streaked Horned Lark      Horned Lark strigata subspecies
Strix occidentalis      Strix occidentalis caurina
Sylvilagus nuttallii nuttallii (British Columbia population)  Sylvilagus nuttallii nuttallii
Sylvilagus nuttallii pinetis (Prairie population)      Sylvilagus nuttallii pinetis
Tailed Frog (Pacific Coast population) Coast Tailed Frog
Tailed Frog (Southern Mountain population)      Rocky Mountain Tailed Frog
Tortula laevipila      Syntrichia laevipila
Tundra Peregrine Falcon      Peregrine Falcon tundrius subspecies
Van Brunt's Jacob's Ladder      Van Brunt's Jacob's-ladder
Virgulus sericeus      Symphyotrichum sericeum
Western Harvest Mouse (British Columbia population)      Western Harvest Mouse megalotis subspecies
Western Harvest Mouse (Prairie population)      Western Harvest Mouse dychei subspecies
Western Prairie Fringed Orchid      Western Prairie Fringed-orchid
Western Silver-leaved Aster      Western Silvery Aster
Western Yellow-breasted Chat (Prairie population)      Yellow-breasted Chat auricollis subspecies (Prairie population)
Willow Aster      Willowleaf Aster
Woodland Caribou (Queen Charlotte Islands population)      Caribou dawsoni subspecies
Woodland Caribou Dawson's subspecies      Caribou dawsoni subspecies
Yellow-breasted Chat (British Columbia population)      Yellow-breasted Chat auricollis subspecies (British Columbia population)
Yellow-breasted Chat (Eastern population)      Yellow-breasted Chat virens subspecies
Yellow-breasted Chat (Prairie population)      Yellow-breasted Chat auricollis subspecies (Prairie population)

Return to Table of Contents

COSEWIC


 
  Chair, COSEWIC
Dr. Marco Festa-Bianchet
Département de biologie
Université de Sherbrooke
Sherbrooke, QC J1K 2R1
  
 

 

SUBCOMMITTEES (2004)

Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge

 

 
 Mr. Larry Carpenter
Co-Chair

Wildlife Management Advisory Council
- Northwest Territories
P.O. Box 2120
Inuvik, NT X0E 0T0
Mr. Henry Lickers
Co-Chair

Mohawk Council of Akwesasne
Department of the Environment
P.O. Box 579
Cornwall, ON K6H 5T3
 
  

 

Species Specialist

 

  
Amphibians and Reptiles
Dr. David M. Green
Co-Chair
Redpath Museum
McGill University
859 Sherbrooke Street West
Montréal, QC H3A 2K6
Dr. Ronald J. Brooks
Co-Chair
Department of Zoology
College of Biological Science
University of Guelph
Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 
  Arthropods
Dr. B. Theresa Fowler
Co-Chair
Species at Risk Branch
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
Ottawa, ON K1A 0H3
Vacant
Co-Chair
       Birds
Richard Cannings
Co-Chair
1330 East Debeck Road
R.R. 1, Site11 - Comp. 96
Naramata, BC V0H 1N0
Dr. Marty L. Leonard
Co-Chair
Department of Biology
Dalhousie University
1355 Oxford Street
Halifax, NS B3H 4J1

 

Freshwater Fishes
Dr. Robert Campbell
Co-Chair
983 Route 800 E
R.R. #1
St. Albert, ON K0A 3C0
Dr. Claude Renaud
Co-Chair
Canadian Museum of Nature
P.O. Box 3443 - Station D
Ottawa, ON K1P 6P4

      

Marine Fishes
Dr. Richard L. Haedrich
Co-Chair
Department of Biology
Memorial University of Newfoundland
4 Clark Place
St. John's, NL A1B 5S7
Dr. Mart R. Gross
Co-Chair
Department of Zoology
University of Toronto
25 Harbord Street
Toronto, ON M5S 3G5      

 

Marine Mammals
Dr. Hal Whitehead
Co-Chair
Department of Biology
Dalhousie University
1355 Oxford Street
Halifax, NS B3H 4J1
Dr. Andrew Trites
Co-Chair
Marine Mammal Research Unit
University of British Columbia
Room 18, Hut B-3
6248 Biological Sciences Road
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4

 

Molluscs
Dr. Gerald L. Mackie
Co-Chair
Department of Zoology
College of Biological Science
University of Guelph
Guelph, ON N1G 2W1
Vacant
Co-Chair

 

Plants and Lichens
Dr. Erich Haber
Co-Chair (Vascular Plants)
c/o National Botanical Services
604 Wavell Avenue
Ottawa, ON K2A 3A8
Dr. René Belland
Co-Chair (Mosses and Lichens)
Devonian Botanic Garden
University of Alberta
Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1      

       

Terrestrial Mammals
Dr. Marco Festa-Bianchet
Département de biologie
Université de Sherbrooke
Sherbrooke, QC J1K 2R1
Dr. M. Brock Fenton
Co-Chair
Department of Biology
University of Western Ontario
London, ON N6A 5B7

 

COSEWIC Logo

 

COSEWIC
Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada

COSEPAC
Comité sur la situation des espèces en péril au Canada

The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) was created in 1977 as a result of a recommendation at the Federal-Provincial Wildlife Conference held in 1976.

It arose from the need for a single, official, scientifically sound, national classification of wildlife species at risk.

In 1978, COSEWIC designated its first species and produced its first list of Canadian species at risk.

In 2002, COSEWIC celebrated 25 years of science-based assessment of the status of species at risk in Canada.

On June 5th 2003, the Species at Risk Act (SARA) was proclaimed. SARA establishes COSEWIC as an advisory body, ensuring that species will continue to be assessed under a rigorous and independent scientific process.

Environment Canada Canadian Wildlife Service   

Environnement Canada Service canadien de la faune   

The Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada, provides full administrative and financial support to the COSEWIC Secretariat.


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