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Recovery Strategy for the Island Blue* (Plebejus saepiolus insulanus) in Canada (Proposed)


Appendix 1: Recovery Strategy for the Greenish Blue insulanus subspecies* (Plebejus saepiolus insulanus) in British Columbia

Greenish Blue insulanus subspecies. Photo: Jennifer Heron.

As provided by the Government of British Columbia

 

Garry Oak Invertebrates Recovery Implementation Group. 2007. Recovery strategy for the Greenish Blue insulanussubspecies (Plebejus saepiolus insulanus) in British Columbia. Prepared for the B.C. Ministry of Environment, Victoria, B.C. 13pp.

* (also known as the Island Blue)

Prepared by the Garry Oak Invertebrates Recovery Implementation Group

British Columbia Ministry of the Environment Logo

June 2007

Disclaimer
Recovery Team Members
Author
Responsible Jurisdictions
Acknowledgements

About the British Columbia Recovery Strategy Series

This series presents the recovery strategies that are prepared as advice to the Province of British Columbia on the general strategic approach required to recover species at risk. The Province prepares recovery strategies to meet our commitments to recover species at risk under the Accord for the Protection of Species at Risk in Canada, and the Canada – British Columbia Agreement on Species at Risk.

What is recovery?

Species at risk recovery is the process by which the decline of an endangered, threatened, or extirpated species is arrested or reversed, and threats are removed or reduced to improve the likelihood of a species' persistence in the wild.

What is a recovery strategy?

A recovery strategy represents the best available scientific knowledge on what is required to achieve recovery of a species or ecosystem. A recovery strategy outlines what is and what is not known about a species or ecosystem; it also identifies threats to the species or ecosystem, and what should be done to mitigate those threats. Recovery strategies set recovery goals and objectives, and recommend approaches to recover the species or ecosystem.

Recovery strategies are usually prepared by a recovery team with members from agencies responsible for the management of the species or ecosystem, experts from other agencies, universities, conservation groups, aboriginal groups, and stakeholder groups as appropriate.

What's next?

In most cases, one or more action plan(s) will be developed to define and guide implementation of the recovery strategy. Action plans include more detailed information about what needs to be done to meet the objectives of the recovery strategy. However, the recovery strategy provides valuable information on threats to the species and their recovery needs that may be used by individuals, communities, land users, and conservationists interested in species at risk recovery.

For more information

To learn more about species at risk recovery in British Columbia, please visit the Ministry of Environment Recovery Planning webpage.

Recommended citation

Garry Oak Invertebrates Recovery Implementation Group. 2007. Recovery strategy for the Greenish Blue insulanussubspecies (Plebejus saepiolus insulanus) in British Columbia. Prepared for the B.C. Ministry of Environment, Victoria, B.C. 13pp.

Cover illustration/photograph

Jennifer Heron

Additional copies

Additional copies can be downloaded from the B.C. Ministry of Environment Recovery Planning documents webpage.

Publication information

Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication Data
Garry Oak Invertebrates Recovery Implementation Group.
Recovery strategy for the Greenish Blue insulanussubspecies (Plebejus saepiolus insulanus) in British Columbia [electronic resource]

Available also on the Internet.
ISBN 978-0-7726-5832-6

1. Plebejus - British Columbia. 2. Butterflies - British Columbia. 3. Endangered species - British Columbia. 4. Wildlife recovery – British Columbia. 5. Wildlife conservation – British Columbia. 6. Wildlife management – British Columbia. I. British Columbia. Ministry of Environment. II. Title.

QL561.L8G37 2007     595.7'8909711     C2007-960180-4

Content (excluding illustrations) may be used without permission, with appropriate credit to the source.

Disclaimer

This recovery strategy has been prepared by the Garry Oak Invertebrates Recovery Implementation Group, as advice to the responsible jurisdictions and organizations that may be involved in recovering the species. The British Columbia Ministry of Environment has received this advice as part of fulfilling its commitments under the Accord for the Protection of Species at Risk in Canada, and the Canada – British Columbia Agreement on Species at Risk.

This document identifies the recovery strategies that are deemed necessary, based on the best available scientific and traditional information, to recover Greenish Blue insulanus subspecies populations in British Columbia. Recovery actions to achieve the goals and objectives identified herein are subject to the priorities and budgetary constraints of participatory agencies and organizations. These goals, objectives, and recovery approaches may be modified in the future to accommodate new objectives and findings.

The responsible jurisdictions and all members of the recovery team had an opportunity to review this document. However, this document does not necessarily represent the official positions of the agencies or the personal views of all individuals on the recovery implementation group.

Success in the recovery of this species depends on the commitment and cooperation of many different constituencies that may be involved in implementing the directions set out in this strategy. The Ministry of Environment encourages all British Columbians to participate in the recovery of Greenish Blue insulanus subspecies.

Recovery Team Members

Garry Oak Invertebrates Recovery Implementation Group

  • Jennifer M. Heron (Chair), B.C. Ministry of Environment, Vancouver, BC
  • Suzie L. Lavallee, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC
  • Laura Byrne, Natural Resources Canada, Victoria, BC
  • Arthur Robinson, Canadian Forest Service, Pacific Forestry Centre, Victoria, BC
  • Robert A. Cannings, Royal British Columbia Museum, Victoria, BC
  • Geoff G.E. Scudder, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC
  • Jessica J. Hellmann, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN
  • Shyanne Smith, Garry Oak Ecosystems Recovery Team, Victoria, BC
  • Chris Junck, Garry Oak Ecosystems Recovery Team, Victoria, BC
  • Ross Vennesland, Parks Canada Agency, Vancouver, BC
  • William Woodhouse, British Columbia Parks and Protected Areas, Nanaimo, BC

Author

Jennifer Heron

Responsible Jurisdictions

The British Columbia Ministry of Environment is responsible for producing a recovery strategy for Greenish Blue insulanussubspecies under the Accord for the Protection of Species at Risk in Canada. Parks Canada Agency and Environment Canada, Canadian Wildlife Service participated in the development of this recovery strategy.

Acknowledgements

The Greenish Blue insulanus subspecies Recovery Strategy was drafted by Jennifer Heron, with subsequent review by the Garry Oak Ecosystems Recovery Team Invertebrates at Risk Recovery Implementation Group. Brenda Costanzo and Ted Lea reviewed the recovery strategy and provided information on plants and plant communities. Photographs were taken by Jennifer Heron.

Document Information