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Species at Risk Act- Legal Listing Consultation Workbook, Pacific Region (2004)

Species at Risk Act- Legal Listing Consultation Workbook, Pacific Region (2004)

Legal listing consultation workbooklegal listing consultation workbook

legal listing consultation workbooklegal listing consultation workbooklegal listing consultation workbook

Consultation Workbook

1.0 Objective of this Consultation

Your views are being sought to assist the government of Canada in making an informed decision on whether to add any or all of the following five aquatic species to Schedule 1 (the List of Wildlife Species at Risk) of the Species at Risk Act (SARA).  The species are currently designated by the Committee on the Status of Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC), and include: White Sturgeon (Endangered), Grey Whale, Harbour Porpoise, Steller Sea Lion, and Rocky Mountain Ridged Mussel (all Special Concern).

This workbook provides background information on SARA and the five species being considered for legal listing.  At the end of this workbook questions are provided to stimulate discussion.  Please complete any or all of the questions starting on page 18 and provide any additional comments you feel are relevant. Your ideas, knowledge, and advice are important to this process and will help the Government of Canada assess the impacts of adding any or all of these five species to the SARA legal list (Schedule 1).

A downloadable workbook, additional background information, references and contact information available at:

http://www-comm.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/pages/consultations/consultation2004/main_e.htm , under: New Proposed SARA Legal Listings.  For further information on how to submit your workbook please see page 18.

To make sure your comments are considered, please send in your submission by Friday, December 10 2004.  Please note: the consultation period for white sturgeon may be extended.

2.0 What is the Species at Risk Act?

The Species at Risk Act was created to ensure the survival of wildlife species and the protection of our natural heritage. It requires Canada to provide for the recovery of species at risk due to human activity, and to manage species of special concern to make sure they don’t become endangered or threatened. It provides for the protection of the species, their residences and critical habitat.

Environment Canada is responsible for implementing SARA and Fisheries and Oceans Canada is responsible for aquatic species.  Parks Canada is also responsible for all species that occur in National Parks (land and water), National Historic Sites, and National Marine Conservation Areas.  Government agencies (federal, provincial, territorial, municipal), Aboriginal peoples, wildlife management boards, non-governmental organizations, landowners, resource users, and individuals across Canada must work together to ensure the survival of species at risk. In fact, the Act was designed to encourage such cooperation.

More information about SARA can be found at: www.speciesatrisk.gc.ca

2.1 The Role of COSEWIC

The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) is the independent body that assesses the status of wildlife species in Canada. Based on the scientific information compiled in a status report, COSEWIC classifies the species as being extinct, extirpated, endangered, threatened, of special concern, data deficient, or not at risk (see glossary for definitions). COSEWIC’s Species Specialist Subcommittees (SSC) provide expertise on particular groups of plants and animals and make recommendations as to the appropriate status designation of a species to the entire Committee.

Members of COSEWIC do not formally represent the agency, group, or region from which they are drawn. They are appointed on the basis of their expertise, and to the best of their ability provide independent and impartial scientific advice and recommendations. 

COSEWIC assesses the biological status of a species using the best available information. It reviews research, considers community and Aboriginal traditional knowledge, and applies strict assessment criteria based on criteria developed by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. COSEWIC sends its assessment of the species to the Minister of the Environment to initiate the legal listing process.

More information about COSEWIC can be found at: www.cosewic.gc.ca

2.2 Legal Listing – What does this mean?

A species is not protected under SARA unless it is legally listed, which means included in the List of Wildlife Species at Risk (Schedule 1 of the Act).

Following receipt of COSEWIC assessments and public consultations, the federal government must do one of the following:

  1. Accept the assessment and add the species to the List,
  2. Decide not to add the species to the List, or
  3. Refer the current assessment back to COSEWIC for further information or consideration.

The decision on whether to add the species to the list takes into account the COSEWIC assessment, information received from consultations like these and other factors such as potential social and economic impacts of the listing.

Once a species is legally listed as extirpated, endangered, or threatened, specific protection measures come into effect barring any harmful actions against the species and their residences.  In addition, a recovery process must be completed within prescribed timelines.

SARA prohibitions only apply to species listed as extirpated, endangered and threatened and not to species of special concern; however existing protections and prohibitions, such as those authorized by the Fisheries Act, Migratory Birds Convention Act and the Canada National Parks Act, continue to be in force.

2.3 Protection

Once species are legally listed as extirpated, endangered or threatened, automatic prohibitions apply. SARA has general prohibitions against killing, harming, taking, possessing, capturing, collecting and damaging or destroying residences that are legally listed. SARA defines residences as: a dwelling-place, such as a den, nest or other similar area or place, that is occupied or habitually occupied by one or more individuals during all or part of their life cycles, including breeding, rearing, staging, wintering, feeding or hibernating.  There will be a need to define more explicitly what a residence is in the case of aquatic species, and to determine whether the term applies to each species.

Prohibitions apply to migratory birds and aquatic species listed as extirpated, endangered or threatened, as well as species found on federal lands in Canada’s exclusive economic zone and in continental shelf areas.  In certain cases prohibitions may apply to provincial and territorial lands.  Prohibitions do not apply to species of special concern.

2.4 Recovery and Management Planning

The recovery process is designed to improve the status of species at risk. There are two parts to the recovery planning process: 1)the development of a recovery strategy, which identifies threats to the species and describes recovery objectives for that species; 2) and the development of an action plan, which describes activities to be carried out to promote the recovery of the species. Action plans are the method used to implement the recovery strategies. Recovery strategies and action plans are only developed for species listed as extirpated, endangered or threatened.  Management plans outlining conservation measures will be developed (or existing plans may be adopted if adequate) for species listed as special concern and their habitats.  Most often, recovery teams are formed to develop a recovery strategy based on the data gathered by COSEWIC as well as other available information. Recovery strategies, action plans, and management plans must be developed in cooperation and consultation with affected parties, and the public will be welcome to comment on any strategy via the Public Registry. Recovery planning is a continuous process -- recovery strategies must be updated every five years until the species is considered recovered.

Recovery strategies and action plans will, to the extent possible, identify the species’ critical habitat and describe examples of activities that are likely to result in its destruction and measures that are proposed to protect it. Where available information is inadequate, a schedule of studies will be included with the objective of identifying the species’ critical habitat. Once critical habitat of a listed endangered or threatened species has been identified in a recovery strategy or action plan, destroying any part of it will be prohibited.

For these 5 species and in the future, the timeline for recovery strategies will be one year from the time of legal listing for endangered species, two years for species listed as extirpated or threatened, and three years for species of special concern.

2.5 Public Registry

The SARA Public Registry is a comprehensive web-based source of information that allows for timely access to public documents relating to SARA. It is a key instrument in fulfilling the government’s commitment to encourage public participation in environmental decision-making.  The Public Registry can be viewed at: www.sararegistry.gc.ca.  

The Registry includes documents such as regulations, orders, agreements, guidelines, standards, and codes of practice. In addition, it provides species assessments and status reports, recovery strategies, action plans, and management plans for the recovery of wildlife species. 

Anyone may provide written comments on a proposed recovery strategy, action plan, or management plan for a wildlife species. The general public has 60 days after the strategy or plan is posted on the Registry to provide feedback.

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Information on Species

Information on Species

The rest of this workbook is structured to provide you with specific information on each of the five COSEWIC proposed species that are being considered for legal listing. Information is provided on COSEWIC status, distribution and biology, reason for designation by COSEWIC, potential protective measures, and impacts. For the full status report for each species, including the threats and limiting factors, please visit: www.sararegistry.gc.ca.

When discussing any impacts associated with legally listing a species it is important to consider that impacts could result from management actions implemented to:

  • comply with the automatic prohibition provisions in the Act for species listed as extirpated, endangered, and threatened; and
  • achieve recovery plan objectives

In general, actions taken to comply with automatic prohibition are immediate, while those implemented to achieve the recovery plan objectives are longer term. A recovery plan will likely expand the initial management measures taken to protect the species and its critical habitat for species listed as extirpated, endangered, and threatened. Any additional or expanded measures will only be implemented after further consultations.

3.1  White Sturgeon pg.  8
3.2  Grey Whalepg. 10
3.3  Harbour Porpoise pg. 12
3.4  Steller Sea Lion pg. 14
3.5  Rocky Mountain Ridged Mussel pg. 16

 

3.1 White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus)

Status:

 

Last Examination by COSEWIC:

 

Species biology and distribution:

 

 COSEWIC Reason for Designation:

Possible Protective Measures and

Impacts:

Endangered

November 2003

White sturgeon are a primitive fish that first appeared over 175 million years ago. They are the largest, longest-lived freshwater fish in North America, that can attain over 100 years in age, and measure almost 6 m and 700 kg in size. The body lacks scales, and possesses five rows of bony plates, or scutes. The mouth is located on the underside of the head, behind a row of barbels used to detect food. This species occurs in large river systems on the Pacific coast of North America. In Canada, white sturgeon are found only in the Fraser, Nechako, Columbia, and Kootenay river systems in British Columbia.

A long-lived species with a 30-40 year generation time and late maturity, that has suffered over a 50% decline in the last three generations. Three of six populations are in imminent threat of extirpation. Extant populations are subject to threats of habitat degradation and loss through dams, impoundments, channelization, dyking and pollution. Illegal fishing (poaching) and incidental catches are also limiting. In addition, a developing commercial aquaculture industry may also impose additional genetic, health and ecological risks to wild populations.

Stakeholders may be impacted from compliance with automatic prohibitions, development and implementation of a recovery plan, and the identification of critical habitat. Benefits of protection and recovery of this species would include the conservation of a unique and valuable component of Canada’s biodiversity, and the potential restoration of opportunities for commercial, recreational, tourism, and traditional uses.

Examples of potential measures to comply with automatic prohibitions and recovery planning objectives may include:

  • existing and additional restrictions on directed and incidental harvest by recreational, commercial, and aboriginal fisheries
  • enhanced monitoring and enforcement of illegal harvest
  • limitations on commercial aquaculture of white sturgeon
  • improved water management through modifications in the structure and operations of dams and other water use facilities
  • restrictions on instream and riparian activities, such as gravel extraction, dredging, log storage and handling, dyking, and construction
  • remediation of industrial, agricultural, and municipal pollution
  • control of exotic and predatory species and prevention of further introductions
  • conservation aquaculture to prevent extinction
  • habitat restoration, including floodplain reclamation, passage reestablishment, turbidity enhancement, and productivity supplementation
  • ongoing research and monitoring of population status, biology, critical habitat, and threats
  • It should be noted that management measures will be
  • developed through the recovery planning process, and  implemented after further consultation.


3.2 Grey Whale (Eschrichtius robustus)

Status:

 

Last Examination by COSEWIC:

 

Species biology and distribution:

 

 

 COSEWIC Reason for Designation:

Special Concern

May 2004

The grey whale is the sole member of the family Eschrichtidae, one of the three families of baleen whales.  It is grey in colour, but is covered with whitish blotches and has a series of bumps on its dorsal ridge, giving it a distinct appearance.  A fully grown grey whale can reach 14 metres long and weigh 35 tonnes.  It follows a very predictable migration route close to shore.  In small groups, they follow the coastline, passing the west coast of Vancouver Island in March and April.  There have been some sightings in Vancouver harbour and around the mouth of the Fraser River Unlike most filter-feeding baleen whales, the grey whale feeds primarily on small crustaceans and molluscs found near the sea floor or in bottom sediments.

Grey whales migrate each year from their winter calving grounds in Mexico to their summer feeding areas in northern Alaska, Russia and Canada. Most of the population passes along the BC coastline, and some individuals repeatedly spend the entire summer feeding in BC (about 80). The population increased by 2.5% per year following the cessation of whaling, and peaked, within the range of pre-exploitation estimates, at about 27,000 animals in 1998. The extent of recovery of the summer resident group is unknown. However, over one-third of the population died from 1998 to 2002 (possibly due to a lack of food in Alaska). Birth rates, survival rates and other indicators suggest that the decline has ceased and that the population is stable or increasing since 2002. The whales are susceptible to human activities in their 4 breeding lagoons in Mexico, as well as to entanglement in fishing gear and collisions with boats throughout their range. Underwater noise associated with proposed oil development in BC could alter migration patterns. The small group of summer-resident whales could also be threatened by subsistence whaling in the USA.

Possible Protective Measures and Impacts:

There are currently no new protection measures planned as a result of listing this species, and no automatic prohibitions are applied to species listed as special concern.  The Marine Mammal Regulations under the Fisheries Act prohibit disturbance and guidelines for marine mammal viewing have been developed to protect marine mammals from disturbance.  Grey whales are the focus of ecotourism and private whale watching on the west coast of Vancouver Island.  The establishment of new, more specific viewing regulations is currently under consideration.  

Over the longer term, management planning may result in additional measures that impact on individuals, businesses, and governments. Benefits of protection and recovery of this species would include the conservation of a unique and valuable component of Canada’s biodiversity.  Furthermore, these populations once recovered and distributed along the coast of British Columbia, will contribute to a sustainable eco-tourism economy and serve as an indicator of a healthy productive eco-system.

Examples of potential protective measures and/or management activities may include:

  • conducting more research on potential threats to the species and the level of impact of various human activities
  • developing guidelines for oil and gas development/seismic exploration
  • modification of commercial fishing activity to avoid entanglements in migratory corridors or feeding habitats
  • modification of shipping traffic routes if collisions or disturbance are found to be a threat
  • establishing guidelines for those who wish to carry out research on the species or in areas or their critical    habitat

 

It should be noted that protective measures will be developed through the management planning process and implemented after further consultation.


3.3 Harbour Porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)

 

Status:

 

Last Examination by COSEWIC:

 

Species biology and distribution:

 

COSEWIC Reason for Designation:

 

Potential Protective Measures and Impacts:

Special Concern

November 2003

The harbour porpoise is a member of the porpoise family. It rarely reaches a length greater than 1.7 meters and weighs about 90 kilograms.  Its dark brown or grey colour on the back blends in very well with the marine environment.  The oldest recorded age for a harbour porpoise is 24 years but most do not live past their teens.  In British Columbia, they are found in shelf-waters throughout the province year-round, with the exception of some deep-water inlets. Density appears to be lower in deep-water basins, e.g., central Strait of Georgia.  Harbour porpoises feed primarily on small schooling fish.

They appear to be particularly sensitive to human activities, and are prone to becoming entrapped and killed in fishing nets. They are a short-lived, shy species that are now rarely seen at the highly developed areas of Victoria and Haro Strait. Continued development and use of its prime habitat by humans are some of the main threats. They are displaced by underwater noise, and could be affected by contaminants in their food chain. 

There are currently no new protection measures planned as a result of listing this species, and no automatic prohibitions are applied to species listed as special concern.  The Marine Mammal Regulations under the Fisheries Act prohibit disturbance and guidelines for marine mammal viewing have been developed to protect marine mammals from disturbance. The establishment of new, more specific viewing regulations is currently under consideration. 

Over the longer term, management planning may result in additional measures that impact on individuals, businesses, and governments. Benefits of protection and recovery of this species would include the conservation of a unique and valuable component of Canada’s biodiversity.  Furthermore, these populations once recovered and distributed along the coast of British Columbia, will contribute to a sustainable eco-tourism economy and serve as an indicator of a healthy productive eco-system.

Examples of potential protective measures and/or management activities may include:

  • more research may be carried out on potential threats to the species and the level of impact of various human activities, especially more research on impacts of gillnets and human-created sounds, including non-military and research sonar
  • restrictions or modifications in the use of gillnets
  • restrictions on the use of Acoustic Deterrent Devices deployed in the marine environment
  • guidelines for oil and gas development/seismic exploration
  • implementation of a program to train and place independent marine mammal observers on oil and gas exploration  vessels and the increased use of fisheries observers
  • potential time/area closures on seismic activity
  • potential exclusion of oil and gas activity from areas of high use by harbour porpoise
  • guidelines may be established for those who wish to carry out research on the species
  • modifications to shipping/recreational boating traffic and guidelines for whale watching operators
  • It should be noted that protective measures will be developed through the management planning process and implemented after further consultation.


3.4 Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus)

Status:

 Last Examination by COSEWIC:

 

Species biology and distribution:

 

 

COSEWIC Reason for Designation:

 Potential Protective Measures and Impacts:

Special Concern

November 2003

 

 

Steller sea lions are the largest member of the Otariidae (eared seals, fur seals, and sea lions).  Adult males reach about 2.7-3.1 meters in length and weigh between 400-800 kilograms, whereas females measure 2.1-2.4 meters and weigh 200-300 kilograms.  Their fur consists mainly of coarse guard hairs and is usually tan in color.  The life span of males is about 20 years and that of females about 30 years.  Within Canada, Steller sea lions occur only in British Columbia and there are three main breeding areas: 1) off the north-eastern tip of Vancouver Island (rookeries on Maggot, Sartine and Triangle Islands); 2) off the southern tip of the Queen Charlotte Islands (rookeries on the Kerouard Islands); and 3) off the northern mainland coast (rookeries on North Danger Rocks).

There are only three breeding locations in British Columbia. Although the population is increasing, they are sensitive to human disturbance while on land. Threats include the possibility of acute oil spills. There are unexplained declines in other populations to the north and west of British Columbia.

There are currently no new protection measures planned as a result of listing this species, and no automatic prohibitions are applied to species listed as special concern.  The Marine Mammal Regulations under the Fisheries Act prohibit disturbance and guidelines for marine mammal viewing have been developed to protect marine mammals from disturbance. The establishment of new, more specific viewing regulations is currently under consideration. 

Over the longer term, management planning may result in additional measures and identification of critical habitat that may impact individuals, businesses, and governments. 

Benefits of protection and recovery of this species would include the conservation of a unique and valuable component of Canada’s biodiversity.  Furthermore, these populations once recovered and distributed along the coast of British Columbia, will contribute to a sustainable eco-tourism economy and serve as an indicator of a healthy productive eco-system.

Examples of potential protective measures and/or management activities may include:

  • additional research on interactions between fisheries and sea lions and assessments of how fishing may impact sea lion populations and their prey and how sea lions may interfere with fishing activities and damage fishing gear 
  • conducting research on potential threats to the species and the level of impact of various human activities such as oil spills, aquaculture, seismic exploration, etc
  • establishment of protected areas for breeding rookeries or other sensitive habitat
  • establishing guidelines for those who wish to carry
  • out research on the species or in areas or their critical habitat

It should be noted that protective measures will be developed through the management planning process and implemented after further consultation.

 


3.5 Rocky Mountain Ridged Mussel (Gonidea angulata)

Status:

 

Last Examination by COSEWIC:

 

Species biology and distribution

 

COSEWIC Reason for Designation:

Potential Protective Measures and Impacts:

Special Concern

November 2003

The Rocky Mountain Ridged Mussel is a freshwater mollusk that inhabits the bottoms of lakes and streams. Its shell is up to 125 mm long, variable in form but typically rather thin, and trapezoidal in shape. Juveniles of this species may be greenish-tan in colour while adults are typically darker, becoming bluish-black. This species’ range is limited to portions of western North America, and in Canada it is found only inthe Columbia River systemin southern British Columbia. It has been observed in several lakes and streams in the Okanagan River system, which appears to contain two distinct but severely fragmented populations. It may also occur in the Columbia River and some of its other smaller tributaries.

The distribution of this species is limited to southern British Columbia in the Okanagan and Kootenay river systems. This species has likely been impacted by the damming of the Kootenay, Columbia and Okanagan rivers and the channelization of the Okanagan River and resulted in loss or alteration of the mussel’s habitat quality and extent.

There are currently no new protection measures planned as a result of listing this species, and no automatic prohibitions are applied to species listed as special concern.  However, over the longer term, recovery planning may result in management measures that may impact individuals, businesses, and governments. Benefits of protection and recovery of this species would include the conservation of a unique and valuable component of Canada’s biodiversity.

Examples of potential protective and management measures may include:

  • improved water management through modifications in the structure and operations of dams and other water use facilities
  • restrictions on instream and riparian activities, such as logging, agriculture, and construction
  • remediation of industrial, agricultural, and municipal pollution
  • ongoing research and monitoring of population status, biology, critical habitat, and threats

It should be noted that protective measures will be developed through the management planning process and implemented after further consultation.

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Contact Information

Contact Information

If you have questions about the Species at Risk Act or the consultation process, or would like to submit a workbook please feel free to contact us.

Mail:

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Attn: Species at Risk Consultations

200 – 401 Burrard Street

Vancouver, BC

V6C 3S4

Tel: (604) 666-2792

E-mail: sara@pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca

In Person:  Any Fisheries and Oceans Office

Feedback Section

The government’s decision on whether or not to list the species will be based on an understanding of the costs and benefits of the impacts of protection and recovery on First Nations, individuals, organizations, industries, and Canadian society in general.  

How to use this workbook:

Please consider the questions provided below, and provide a response to any or all of the questions that interest you. It is important that you indicate which species your comments are intended for. You may wish to fill out one set of questions for each species if your answers are different for each, but you can combine your answers on one form if they pertain to all the species you tick off at the beginning.  One extra copy of the questionnaire is attached to the workbook and more are available as noted below. Additional briefs or letters can be appended to this workbook.

The four options available for submitting the workbook are:                  

1.    Submit written responses at the consultation sessions.

2.    Download a word or Pdf version of the workbook at:

http://www-comm.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/pages/consultations/consultation2004/main_e.htm

3.    Fill out the workbook on-line

4.    E-mail completed electronic versions to: sara@pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca

5.    Mail completed hard copies to the address above. 

Workbooks must be submitted by Friday, December 10 2004.  Please note: the consultation period for white sturgeon may be extended.

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Survey

Survey

Name (optional):  

 Organization/Affiliation:

 NOTE:Two copies of this form are provided, if you require additional forms to provide comments that are different between the species please visit: http://www-comm.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/pages/consultations/consultation2004/main_e.htmto download a copy or fill in online, or pick up these forms at any of the consultation sessions.  You may chose to fill one

 1)    Are you familiar with the Species at Risk Act?    Yes          No

Check all that apply.

 

Not familiar
I have read all or part of the Act        
I have received written information (e.g. pamphlets)
I have participated in information and/or consultation sessions
I have received information from the media           
Other

 2)    Have you read the COSEWIC status report for any of the 5 aquatic species being considered for legal listing?

Yes             If yes, please specify __________________       No

 3)    Which sector(s) do you represent?  Check all that apply.

 

Academic
Agriculture 
Commercial Fishing/Processing/Sales
Environmental Organization
Farming
Forestry
Government
Guiding/Fish Charter
Oil and Gas
Private Sector – Other
Professional Services
Retired
Recreational Fishing
Stewardship Group
Student
Whale Watching
Other  
     Not in the labour force

 4)    Where do you reside?

Queen Charlotte Islands
North Coast BC
Central Coast BC
North Vancouver Island (i.e. Port Hardy, Alert Bay, etc.)
Mid Vancouver Island (Campbell River, Comox-Courtney, Parksville, etc.)
South Vancouver Island (Nanaimo, Ladysmith, Duncan, Cowichan, etc.)
Victoria and Area
Upper West Coast Vancouver Island (Quatsino, Kyuquot, Tahsis, etc.)
Lower West Coast Vancouver Island (Ahousat, Tofino, Bamfield, Port Alberni)
Sunshine Coast
Lower mainland
Interior BC
Other In BC
Other Outside BC

 I am commenting on the following species: 

                                             

Grey Whale
Steller Sea Lion
Harbour Porpoise
Rocky Mountain Ridged Mussel
White Sturgeon
All of the above

5)    Do you support the listing of this species?    Yes        No         Undecided

6)    Please select one of the following for each statement below:

 Strong DisagreeSomewhat DisagreeIndifferentSomewhat AgreeStrongly Agree
      
I believe the species is valuable because it plays an important role in maintaining healthy ecosystems.     
I believe the species is valuable to future generations.     
I value this species even though I may never see one personally.     
I believe this species needs special protection or care from human interactions and/or activities.     
I believe protection of this species will have a positive effect on my business/career.     
I believe a legal listing of this species may restrict my recreational, employment or personal activities.     
I am prepared to suffer a loss in revenue to protect a species at risk.     
I believe it is important for the Government of Canada to allocate federal funding to support recovery of this species.     

 Please specify additional reasons to support the legal listing of this species. In particular, please provide information that would be useful for deciding whether to list the species.

If this species were legally listed, Fisheries & Oceans Canada realizes that there could be potential changes in income or revenue to you or your employer.  To help us better understand the impacts please check each of the following that apply to you:

 7.  A. If there is a potential change in your income, is it a gain or a loss?

    

 Gain                Loss                No Change               Don’t know

 B.    What is the potential change in your income?

Less than $5,000
$5,000 - 10,000
$10,000 - 20,000
$20,000 - 30,000
Greater than $30,000 – please estimate the amount $______

  C.    What percentage of your income depends on this species?

0-20%
20-40%
40-60%
60-80%
80-100%

 8.    A.  If there is a potential change in revenue to your industry, business or employer is it a gain or a loss?

    

 Gain                Loss                No Change               Don’t know          

     B.  What is the potential change in revenue?

 

Less than $25,000
$25,000 – 50,000
$50,000-100,000
$100,000-150,000
Greater than $150,000 – please estimate the amount $_____

 C.    What percentage of your industry, business or employer’s revenue depends on this species?

 

0-20%
20-40%
40-60%
60-80%
80-100%

 If you do not support the listing of this species, please tell us why.  In particular, please provide information that would be useful in deciding whether to list the species.

 9.    Please add any other comments or concerns (include additional sheets, if necessary).

 

****Workbooks must be submitted by Friday, December 10 2004.  Please note: the consultation period for white sturgeon may be extended.****

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Appendix A:  Glossary of Terms

Appendix A:  Glossary of Terms

Action Plan:
A document that sets out specific ways to put a recovery strategy into effect.
Aquatic species:
All ‘fish’ including:
  1. parts of fish,
  2. shellfish, crustaceans, marine animals, and any parts of shellfish, crustaceans, or marine animals,
  3. the eggs, sperm, spawn, larvae, spat, and juvenile stages of fish, shellfish, crustaceans, and marine animals.
Competent Minister:
  The Minister of Fisheries and Oceans is the competent minister for listed aquatic species. The Minister of Canadian Heritage (Parks Canada Agency) is the competent minister for listed species found in national parks, national historic sites, and other national protected heritage areas. The Minister of the Environment is the competent minister for all other listed species and for the overall administration of the law.
Critical habitat:
Habitat that is necessary for the survival or recovery of a listed wildlife species and that is identified as the species’ critical habitat in the recovery or in an action plan for the species
Habitat:
In respect to aquatic species, spawning grounds and nursery, rearing, food supply, migration, and any other areas on which aquatic species depend directly or indirectly in order to carry out their life processes, or areas where aquatic species formerly occurred and have the potential to be reintroduced
Endangered species:
Wildlife species that is facing imminent extirpation or extinction
Extirpated species:
Wildlife species that no longer exist in the wild in Canada, but exist elsewhere in the wild
Recovery Strategy: 
A document prepared by the competent minister in cooperation and consultation with other governments, wildlife management boards, Aboriginal organizations, landowners, and others who are likely to be affected by the strategy.  It identifies the population goal and objectives, and broad recovery approaches to abate threats.
Species of special concern:
Wildlife species that may become a threatened or endangered species because of a combination of biological characteristics and identified threats.
Threatened species:
Wildlife species that is likely to become an endangered species if nothing is done to reverse the factors leading to its extirpation or extinction.

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