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Species at Risk Act
Recovery strategy series

Adopted under Section 44 of SARA

Northern Leopard Frog

Photo of Northern Leopard Frog
Photo: © Barb Houston

Part 1 - Table of contents

List of figures

  • Figure 1. Overview of areas within which critical habitat is found for Northern Leopard Frog, Rocky Mountain population at the three known locations in British Columbia, Canada: Creston Valley, Kootenay River floodplain, and Columbia Marshes.
  • Figure 2. Critical habitat for Northern Leopard Frog, Rocky Mountain population near Creston, B.C. is represented by the shaded yellow polygon (unit) where the criteria and methodology set out in Section 4.1 are met. The detailed unit within which critical habitat is found (15,518 hectares (ha)) represents identified critical habitat, excepting only those areas that clearly do not meet the needs of the species in any life stage. The 1 km x 1 km UTM grid overlay shown on this figure is a standardized national grid system that indicates the general geographic area containing critical habitat in Canada. Areas outside of the shaded yellow polygon do not contain critical habitat.
  • Figure 3. Critical habitat for Northern Leopard Frog, Rocky Mountain population at Upper Kootenay Floodplain, B.C. is represented by the shaded yellow polygon (unit) where the criteria and methodology set out in Section 4.1 are met. The detailed unit within which critical habitat is found (15,798 ha) represents identified critical habitat, excepting only those areas that clearly do not meet the needs of the species in any life stage. The 1 km x 1 km UTM grid overlay shown on this figure is a standardized national grid system that indicates the general geographic area containing critical habitat in Canada. Areas outside of the shaded yellow polygon do not contain critical habitat.
  • Figure 4. Critical habitat for Northern Leopard Frog, Rocky Mountain population at Columbia Marshes, B.C. is represented by the shaded yellow polygon (unit) where the criteria and methodology set out in Section 4.1 are met. The detailed unit within which critical habitat is found (4,697 ha) represents identified critical habitat, excepting only those areas that clearly do not meet the needs of the species in any life stage. The 1 km x 1 km UTM grid overlay shown on this figure is a standardized national grid system that indicates the general geographic area containing critical habitat in Canada. Areas outside of the shaded yellow polygon do not contain critical habitat.

List of tables

  • Table 1. Conservation status of the Northern Leopard Frog, Rocky Mountain population (from NatureServe 2014, B.C. Conservation Data Centre 2014, and B.C. Conservation Framework 2014).
  • Table 2. Location, status, and description of Northern Leopard Frog populations in British Columbia.(B.C.)
  • Table 3. Summary of essential functions, features, and biophysical attributes of Northern Leopard Frog habitat in British Columbia.
  • Table 4. Schedule of Studies to Identify critical habitat
  • Table 5. Examples of activities likely to result in destruction of critical habitat for Northern Leopard Frog, Rocky Mountain population in Canada. Threat numbers are in accordance with the IUCN World Conservation Union–Conservation Measures Partnership unified threats classification system (CMP 2010).

Part 2 - Table of contents

List of figures

  • Figure 1. Adult Northern Leopard Frog. (Photo credit: Barb Houston)
  • Figure 2. Current distribution of Northern Leopard Frogs in North America (from Kendell 2003, with permission).
  • Figure 3. Historical and present distribution of Northern Leopard Frogs in British Columbia.

List of tables

  • Table 1. Locations of recently documented Northern Leopard Frog populations in B.C.
  • Table 2. Threat classification table for the Northern Leopard Frog in British Columbia.
  • Table 3. Recovery planning table for Northern Leopard Frog in British Columbia.
  • Table 4. Species at risk whose habitats may overlap with Northern Leopard Frog (B.C. Conservation Data Centre 2012).
Tables of contents