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COSEWIC Annual Report 2003

Appendix IV.

 

COSEWIC Status Assessments, May 2003.

Results are grouped by taxon and then by status category. A reason for designation is given for each species. A short history of status designations follows. The Canadian range of each species (by province, territory and ocean) is provided.

Mammals

 
North AtlanticRight WhaleEubalaena glacialisEndangered
 Reason for Designation
 The species, found only in the North Atlantic, was heavily reduced by whaling. The total population currently numbers about 322 animals (about 220-240 mature animals), has been decreasing during the last decade, and is experiencing high mortality from ship strikes and entanglement in fishing gear. A sophisticated demographic model gives an estimated mean time to extinction of 208 years.
 OccurrenceAtlantic Ocean 
 Status History
 The Right Whale was considered a single species and designated Endangered in 1980. Status re-examined and confirmed Endangered in April 1985 and in April 1990. Split into two species in May 2003 to allow a separate designation of the North Atlantic Right Whale. North Atlantic Right Whale was designated Endangered in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Sei WhaleBalaenoptera borealisEndangered
 Pacific population
 Reason for Designation
 This was one of the most abundant species sought by whalers off the British Columbia coast (with over 4000 individuals killed) and was also commonly taken in other areas of the eastern North Pacific. Sei whales have not been reported in British Columbia since whaling ended and may now be gone. There are few, if any, mature individuals remaining in British Columbia waters; and there is clear evidence of a dramatic decline caused by whaling and no sign of recovery.
 OccurrencePacific Ocean 
 Status History
 Designated Endangered in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Townsend's MoleScapanus townsendiiEndangered
 Reason for Designation
 There are only about 450 mature individuals in a single Canadian population with a range of 13 km², adjacent to a small area of occupied habitat in the USA. Threats to the population include trapping by pest removal companies and property owners. The habitat has been degraded through fragmentation and urbanization. There is no evidence of decline over the last 10 years. It is uncertain whether immigration across the international border may rescue the Canadian population.
 OccurrenceBC 
 Status History
 Designated Threatened in April 1996. Status re-examined and uplisted to Endangered in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
WolverineGulo guloEndangered
 Eastern population
 Reason for Designation
 There have been no verified reports of this species in Québec or Labrador for about 25 years but there are unconfirmed reports almost every year. Any remaining population would be extremely small and therefore at high risk of extinction from stochastic events such as incidental harvest. The apparent lack of recovery despite the recent high local abundance of caribou suggests that this population may be extirpated.
 OccurrenceQC NL 
 Status History
 Canadian range considered as one population in April 1982 and designated Special Concern. Split into two populations in April 1989 (Western population and Eastern population). Eastern population was designated Endangered in April 1989 and confirmed in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Humpback WhaleMegaptera novaeangliaeThreatened
 North Pacific population
 Reason for Designation
 Heavily reduced by whaling, the North Pacific population seems to have regrown over the last decades, and anecdotal information from British Columbia suggests that numbers are increasing. However, there is considerable population segregation, and the number of animals that use British Columbia waters is probably in the low hundreds. The high-level of feeding ground fidelity suggests that if animals are exterminated from a particular area, it is unlikely that the area will be rapidly repopulated from other areas. Two extirpated British Columbia populations have shown no sign of rescue. Humpbacks are occasionally entangled in fishing gear in British Columbia, though the number entangled is not thought to threaten or limit the population. In summary, humpback whales in British Columbia appear to be well below historical numbers and have not returned to some portions of their former range.
 OccurrencePacific Ocean 
 Status History
 The "Western North Atlantic and North Pacific populations" were given a single designation of Threatened in April 1982. Split into two populations in April 1985 (Western North Atlantic population and North Pacific population). North Pacific population designated Threatened in 1985. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Harbour PorpoisePhocoena phocoenaSpecial Concern
 Northwest Atlanticpopulation
 Reason for Designation
 Harbour porpoise are widely distributed and can be divided into three populations that summer in the Gulf of Maine/Bay of Fundy, the Gulf of St Lawrence, and Newfoundland-Labrador. Many animals (probably thousands and perhaps a significant proportion of the population) die each year due to incidental capture in fisheries. Reduced fishing for groundfish may have lowered bycatch, but the benefits to porpoise, if any, need to be quantified. Management plans to reduce bycatch are only in place in the Gulf of Maine/Bay of Fundy. Harbour porpoise can be excluded from important habitat by acoustic harassment devices associated with aquaculture.
 OccurrenceAtlantic Ocean 
 Status History
 Designated Threatened in April 1990. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1991. Downlisted to Special Concern in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
WolverineGulo guloSpecial Concern
 Western population
 Reason for Designation
 Estimated total population size exceeds 13,000 mature individuals. Declines have been reported in Alberta and parts of British Columbia and Ontario. A distinct subspecies may be extirpated from Vancouver Island. Many pelts used locally are not included in official statistics, and harvest levels may be underreported. There is no evidence, however, of a decline in harvest. There are no data on overall population trends other than those provided by local knowledge and harvest monitoring programs. This species' habitat is increasingly fragmented by industrial activity, especially in the southern part of its range, and increased motorized access will increase harvest pressure and other disturbances. The species has a low reproductive rate and requires vast secure areas to maintain viable populations.
 OccurrenceYT NT NU BC AB SK MB ON 
 Status History
 Canadian range considered as one population in April 1982 and designated Special Concern. Split into two populations in April 1989 (Western and Eastern populations). Western population was designated Special Concern in April 1989. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Humpback WhaleMegaptera novaeangliaeNot at Risk
 Western North Atlantic population
 Reason for Designation
 Although heavily reduced by whaling, this well-studied population seems to have regrown to at least a substantial proportion of its pre-whaling size. The population does face threats (including entanglement in fishing gear, habitat degradation on breeding grounds, possible resumption of commercial whaling), but neither the North Atlantic population, nor any of its feeding sub-populations, is at risk from current activity levels, or levels that may reasonably be foreseen in the next few years.
 OccurrenceAtlantic Ocean 
 Status History
 The "Western North Atlantic and North Pacific populations" were given a single designation of Threatened in April 1982. Split into two populations in April 1985 (Western North Atlantic population and North Pacific population). Western North Atlantic population designated Special Concern in April 1985. Status re-examined and de-listed (Not at Risk) in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Sei WhaleBalaenoptera borealisData Deficient
 Atlantic population
 Reason for Designation
 This species is seen off Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. However, data are lacking to determine the degree of depletion caused by whaling, to assess current population size, or to determine whether the population has recovered in any way since whaling ended. The effects of current threats, especially oil and gas exploration and development, are unknown. There is also uncertainty regarding possible population substructure.
 OccurrenceAtlantic Ocean 
 Status History
 Designated Data Deficient in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 

Birds

 
Cerulean WarblerDendroica ceruleaSpecial Concern
 Reason for Designation
 This species breeds in mature deciduous forests in southern Ontario and southwestern Quebec, a habitat which has disappeared from much of its Canadian range in the last 200 years. The species has been steadily declining in numbers (three per cent per annum over the last 30 years), but most of this decline has been occurring in the core of the species' range in the U.S. and numbers may be relatively stable in eastern Ontario. Numbers in southwestern Ontario, however, have declined markedly, and overall numbers in Canada are low - less than 2000 mature individuals. The two dominant limiting factors for this species are habitat destruction on breeding, migration, and wintering grounds; and fragmentation of existing habitats.
 OccurrenceON QC 
 Status History
 Designated Special Concern in April 1993. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 

Reptiless

 
Rubber BoaCharina bottaeSpecial Concern
 Reason for Designation
 Although this species may be widespread in British Columbia its status is difficult to determine because the species is cryptic. However, searches indicate that this species is uncommon and patchily distributed. Because the species' abundance is poorly documented, it could qualify as Data Deficient, but the species' life history traits - low reproductive rate, delayed age at maturity and extended longevity, make it sensitive to human activity. Therefore, this species merits the current status until further investigation shows that it is at higher risk or is secure.
 OccurrenceBC 
 Status History
 Designated Special Concern in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Northwestern GartersnakeThamnophis ordinoidesNot at Risk
 Reason for Designation
 Although this species has a fairly limited distribution in Canada and is susceptible to several threats (mortality on roads, habitat loss, and depredation by domestic and feral cats) and direct persecution, it appears to be abundant and to have suffered declines only where urban development is most intense.
 OccurrenceBC 
 Status History
 Designated Not at Risk in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 

Amphibians

 
Canadian ToadBufo hemiophrysNot at Risk
 Reason for Designation
 Despite continuing loss of native grassland habitat, and the degradation of wetlands necessary for reproduction, recent information indicates that populations of Canadian toads overall, though patchy in distribution and exhibiting declines in south-central Alberta, remain numerous and widely distributed through most of the species' Canadian range.
 OccurrenceNT AB SK MB 
 Status History
 Designated Not at Risk in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Plains SpadefootSpea bombifronsNot at Risk
 Reason for Designation
 Despite continuing loss of native grassland habitat and degradation of the wetlands necessary for reproduction, the maintenance of large areas of more southern portions of its range in grazing reserves and recent reports of occurrence in its extensive range indicate that this species is more secure than previous information would have indicated.
 OccurrenceAB SK MB 
 Status History
 Designated Not at Risk in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 

Fishes

 
Atlantic CodGadus morhuaEndangered
 Newfoundland and Labrador population
 Reason for Designation
 Cod in the inshore and offshore waters of Labrador and northeastern Newfoundland, including Grand Bank, having declined 97% since the early 1970s and more than 99% since the early 1960s, are now at historically low levels. There has been virtually no recovery of either the abundance or age structure of cod in offshore waters since the moratoria imposed in 1992 and 1993. Threats to persistence include fishing (now halted), predation by fish and seals, and natural and fishing-induced changes to the ecosystem.
 OccurrenceAtlantic Ocean 
 Status History
 The species was considered a single unit and assigned a status of Special Concern in April 1998. When the species was split into separate populations in May 2003, the Newfoundland and Labrador population was designated Endangered. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Sockeye SalmonOncorhynchus nerkaEndangered
 Cultus population
 Reason for Designation
 The Cultus population has unique genetic and biological characteristics (migratory delay of adults at the Fraser estuary, protracted lake residency before spawning, exclusive lake spawning, late spawning date, deepwater life of fry). The lack of success with previous attempts to transplant sockeye to Cultus lake and other lakes, suggests that Cultus sockeye are irreplaceable. The Cultus population has collapsed primarily due to overexploitation, including directed and incidental catches in mixed-stock fisheries at levels above those that can be sustained. An additional key source of impact on spawning adults since 1995 has been very high pre-spawn mortality, associated with unusually early migration into freshwater and with Parvicapsula parasite infestation. There are also ecological impacts to the lake habitat from colonization by Eurasian Watermilfoil, land development, stream channelization, nutrient input, and recreational use. Under present conditions, there is a high probability of extinction of the Cultus sockeye.
 Occurrence  
 Status History
 Designated Endangered in an emergency listing in October 2002. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Sockeye SalmonOncorhynchus nerkaEndangered
 Sakinaw population
 Reason for Designation
 The Sakinaw population has unique genetic and biological characteristics (early river-entry timing, protracted lake residency before spawning, small adult size, low fecundity, large smolts). The lack of success with previous attempts to transplant sockeye to Sakinaw lake and other lakes suggests that Sakinaw sockeye are irreplaceable. The Sakinaw population has collapsed primarily due to overexploitation, including directed and incidental catches in mixed-stock fisheries at levels above those that can be sustained. In addition, water flow and water level have at times been insufficient to allow adult fish to enter the lake. There are also ecological impacts on the lake habitat from logging, residential development and water usage. Because very few fish remain, the population is at high risk of extinction from even minor impacts from fishing, poaching, impediments to spawning migration, predation, habitat degradation and water usage.
 OccurrenceBC Pacific Ocean 
 Status History
 Designated Endangered in an emergency listing in October 2002. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Atlantic CodGadus morhuaThreatened
 Laurentian North population
 Reason for Designation
 Cod in the Northern Gulf of St. Lawrence and along the south coast of Newfoundland comprise an assemblage of stocks within which there is considerable mixing. They are currently at low levels as a group and overall have declined by about 80% over the past thirty years. However, there is evidence that current levels of abundance are not unprecedented for cod along the south coast of Newfoundland, and the population there has been stable since 1974. Threats to persistence include fishing (now halted in the Northern Gulf), predation by fish and seals, and natural and fishing-induced changes to the ecosystem.
 OccurrenceAtlantic Ocean 
 Status History
 The species was considered a single unit and assigned a status of Special Concern in April 1998. When the species was split into separate populations in May 2003, the Laurentian North population was designated Threatened. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
CuskBrosme brosmeThreatened
 Reason for Designation
 The main population of this large, slow-growing, solitary bottom-living fish resides in the Gulf of Maine/Southeastern Scotian Shelf and has been in decline since 1970. Over three generations, the decline rate is over 90%, and the fish occurs in fewer and fewer survey trawls over time. Fishing, unrestricted until 1999, is now capped but remains a source of mortality. This species is in a monotypic North Atlantic genus.
 OccurrenceAtlantic Ocean 
 Status History
 Designated Threatened in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Shortjaw CiscoCoregonus zenithicusThreatened
 Reason for Designation
 This species has been extirpated from Lakes Huron and Erie and is in decline in Lake Superior and Great Slave Lake. It is still present in Lake Nipigon and numerous smaller lakes where its status is not well known. Threats include fishing, introduction of exotics and climate change.
 OccurrenceNT AB SK MB ON 
 Status History
 Designated Threatened in April 1987. Status re-examined and confirmed Threatened in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Atlantic CodGadus morhuaSpecial Concern
 Maritimes population
 Reason for Designation
 Cod in the Southern Gulf of the St. Lawrence, across the Scotian Shelf and into the Gulf of Maine comprise a heterogeneous assemblage of stocks that are at low levels of abundance as a group. These levels are not unprecedented for the cod in the Southern Gulf, Southwest Scotian shelf, Bay of Fundy and George's Bank, but those on the Eastern Scotian Shelf, are at historic lows and have continued to decline in the absence of directed fishing. Overall, cod in the entire region have declined 14% in the past 30 years, and have demonstrated a sensitivity to human activities. Threats to persistence include directed fishing, bycatch in other fisheries, natural predation, and natural and fishing-induced changes to the ecosystem.
 OccurrenceAtlantic Ocean 
 Status History
 The species was considered a single unit and assigned a status of Special Concern in April 1998. When the species was split into separate populations in May 2003, the Maritimes population was designated Special Concern. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Atlantic CodGadus morhuaSpecial Concern
 Arctic population
 Reason for Designation
 Cod in Arctic waters occur mostly in a few coastal salt lakes, and numbers of adults may be no more than a few thousand. Uncertainty with respect to the actual number of locales and populations makes it difficult to assign any higher status, but the known populations are sensitive to human activities. Poorly regulated fishing is a potential threat.
 OccurrenceArctic Ocean 
 Status History
 The species was considered a single unit and assigned a status of Special Concern in April 1998. When the species was split into separate populations in May 2003, the Arctic population was designated Special Concern. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Banded KillifishFundulus diaphanusSpecial Concern
 Newfoundland population
 Reason for Designation
 The population is separated from others by a major barrier to movement, i.e. 200 km of ocean. Newfoundland populations have a very limited area of occupancy. The possibility of range expansion is limited by steep gradients and impassable rapids and/or falls. Habitat degradation resulting from proposed logging would negatively impact populations in some areas.
 OccurrenceNL 
 Status History
 Designated Special Concern in April 1989. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
ChiselmouthAcrocheilus alutaceusNot at Risk
 Reason for Designation
 The Canadian distribution of this species is restricted to a few disjunct populations in south-central British Columbia where they are found in low densities, but appear stable and are not subject to any known factors that could put them at risk.
 OccurrenceBC 
 Status History
 Designated Data Deficient in April 1997. Status re-examined and designated Not at Risk in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Wolf-eelAnarrhichthys ocellatusNot at Risk
 Reason for Designation
 The charismatic appearance and behaviour of the wolf-eel in the presence of divers has made it a favourite for underwater photo opportunities. The scuba diving community no longer regards the killing of wolf-eels as sport, and the prevailing attitude toward the species is very protective. In the absence of any significant exploitation factors or habitat losses, combined with reports of apparently stable and abundant adult populations, the future of the wolf-eel appears secure.
 OccurrencePacific Ocean 
 Status History
 Designated Not at Risk in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Pighead PricklebackAcantholumpenus mackayiData Deficient
 Reason for Designation
 There are insufficient data on population size and distribution.
 OccurrenceArctic Ocean 
 Status History
 Designated Special Concern in April 1989. Status re-examined in May 2003 and designated Data Deficient. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 

Lepidopterans

 
Mormon MetalmarkApodemia mormoEndangered
 Southern Mountain population
 Reason for Designation
 The Southern Mountain population of this species is a very small, disjunct, northern outlier of a species whose main range occurs in the southwestern US. The butterflies are confined to a very small area in a narrow valley in a populated area in southern British Columbia. The valley bottom is also an important transportation and utility corridor. The butterfly is vulnerable to natural stochastic events, and human activity can easily cause the extirpation of colonies.
 OccurrenceBC 
 Status History
 Designated Endangered in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Mormon MetalmarkApodemia mormoThreatened
 Prairie population
 Reason for Designation
 The Prairie population of this species is a small, northern outlier of a species whose main range occurs in the southwestern US. Known populations are not currently threatened by human activities and half the known sites are within the boundaries of a National Park. However, the total population is quite small, likely undergoes extreme fluctuations, is a habitat specialist, and occurs in a highly restricted area, making it vulnerable to stochastic events.
 OccurrenceSK 
 Status History
 Designated Threatened in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 

Molluscs

 
KidneyshellPtychobranchus fasciolarisEndangered
 Reason for Designation
 This species has been lost from about 70% of its historical range in Canada due to impacts of the zebra mussel and land use practices. It is now restricted to the East Sydenham and Ausable rivers. Although both populations appear to be reproducing, there is evidence that abundance has declined in the East Sydenham River. Agricultural impacts, including siltation, have eliminated populations in the Grand and Thames Rivers, and threaten the continued existence of this species in Canada.
 OccurrenceON 
 Status History
 Designated Endangered in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Round HickorynutObovaria subrotundaEndangered
 Reason for Designation
 This species has been lost from 90% of its former range in Canada. Populations in the Grand and Thames rivers are extirpated and populations in the Sydenham River are declining, all due to the combined effects of pollution and agricultural impacts. Most of the Great Lakes populations have been lost due to impacts of the zebra mussel, and the remaining population in the St. Clair delta near Walpole Island may be at risk. If the Eastern Sand Darter were the host of this species, then the decline of this threatened fish would affect the mussel's survival.
 OccurrenceON 
 Status History
 Designated Endangered in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Dromedary Jumping-slugHemphillia dromedariusThreatened
 Reason for Designation
 A rare mollusc found on Vancouver Island. All known sites are in old growth forest or in forests that contain old growth characteristics.
 OccurrenceBC 
 Status History
 Designated Threatened in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Warty Jumping-slugHemphillia glandulosaSpecial Concern
 Reason for Designation
 Habitat loss and fragmentation through clear-cut logging forest practices are altering quantity and quality of coarse woody debris that provides refuges for the slugs and may be restricting dispersal movements. The species exists at the northern extremity of its range on southern Vancouver Island and the low numbers of scattered populations render it vulnerable to both natural and human disturbances.
 OccurrenceBC 
 Status History
 Designated Special Concern in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 

Plants

 
Coastal Scouler's CatchflySilene scouleri ssp. grandisEndangered
 Reason for Designation
 This is a species of highly restricted geographical occurrence in Canada with fewer than 350 plants comprising three remaining populations present on very small islands. Along with other historical population extirpations, a Vancouver Island population has recently been extirpated. These islands are located within an area of active shipping and recreational activities where invasive plants and human activities present on-going risks.
 OccurrenceBC 
 Status History
 Designated Endangered in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Eastern Prairie Fringed OrchidPlatanthera leucophaeaEndangered
 Reason for Designation
 This is a perennial species of scattered remnant wetland habitats and of mesic prairies that has undergone significant declines in population size and is at continued risk from further habitat change due to successional processes, land development, water table impacts, and spread of invasive species.
 OccurrenceON 
 Status History
 Designated Special Concern in April 1986. Status re-examined and uplisted to Endangered in May 2003. Last assessment based on an update status report.
 
Howell's TriteleiaTriteleia howelliiEndangered
 Reason for Designation
 This is a geographically highly restricted species with a small population occurring at a few scattered sites within remnant Garry Oak habitats. It is located within a highly urbanized region with on-going risks to the species from such factors as habitat loss, competition with invasive species, habitat loss, habitat fragmentation and competition with invasive species.
 OccurrenceBC 
 Status History
 Designated Endangered in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Kellogg's RushJuncus kelloggiiEndangered
 Reason for Designation
 This is a tiny, inconspicuous, annual species that likely numbers fewer than 600 plants. It occurs in a single, seasonally wet microhabitat that is subject to impacts from human recreational and developmental activities within an urban park located in a nationally rare Garry Oak habitat.
 OccurrenceBC 
 Status History
 Designated Endangered in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Lemmon's Holly FernPolystichum lemmoniiThreatened
 Reason for Designation
 This species consists of a single small population occurring within a geographically highly restricted area of specialized habitat. The habitat consists of shallow soils over serpentine bedrock high in heavy metals. The population is considerably disjunct from other such populations in the adjoining state to the south and occurs in an area potentially subject to mineral extraction.
 OccurrenceBC 
 Status History
 Designated Threatened in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.
 
Willowleaf AsterSymphyotrichum praealtumThreatened
 Reason for Designation
 This is a geographically highly restricted species that has undergone range contraction and occurs mainly in fragmented remnant prairie habitats. There are few occurrences and on-going risks from further habitat and population losses due to presence primarily in urbanized centres.
 OccurrenceON 
 Status History
 Designated Special Concern in April 1999. Status re-examined and confirmed in April 1996. Status re-examined and uplisted to Threatened in May 2003. Last assessment based on an existing status report.
 
Climbing Prairie RoseRosa setigeraSpecial Concern
 Reason for Designation
 This is a shrub of remnant prairie habitats and clearings that is capable of also colonizing a variety of open disturbed sites within a geographically and climatically restricted region where decline in the extent and quality of habitat continues. Threats include factors such as urban expansion and intensive agricultural land use.
 OccurrenceON 
 Status History
 Designated Special Concern in April 1986. Status re-examined and uplisted to Threatened in May 2002. Downlisted to Special Concern in May 2003. Last assessment based on an existing status report with an addendum.
 

Mosses

 
Spoon-leaved MossBryoandersonia illecebraEndangered
 Reason for Designation
 This species is endemic to eastern North America. The species reaches its northernmost limit in southern Ontario where it is known presently from only three locations and covers an area of < 14 m². Although previously recorded from an additional five sites in Canada, the species was not relocated in recent field studies. The species grows in humid deciduous woods and does not disperse easily. In Canada, it occurs in woodlots that are severely fragmented by intense urbanization and agriculture. The status of this species is based on a small number of locations, very small population size, and decline in the quality and quantity of forest habitat.
 OccurrenceON 
 Status History
 Designated Endangered in May 2003. Assessment based on a new status report.

Note: The reports for Stoloniferous Pussytoes (Antennaria flagellaris), Slender Collomia (Collomia tenella), Dwarf Woolly-heads (Psilocarphus brevissimus var. brevissimus) and Small-flowered Tonella (Tonella tenella) were withdrawn to allow incorporation of additional information.