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Barrens Willow (Salix jejuna Fernald)

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Barrens Willow (Salix jejuna Fernald) is endemic to the limestone barrens of the Strait of Belle Isle on the northwestern part of the Great Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland. It is threatened by habitat loss and degradation, from land use activities. It was assessed by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) in 2001 as an endangered species, and listed as such under the Newfoundland and Labrador Endangered Species Act and the federal Species at Risk Act in 2002 and 2003, respectively. The recovery goal for this species is to secure the long term persistence of the natural population throughout its range. Achievement of this goal is primarily dependent upon the removal or mitigation of anthropogenic threats.

This strategy document outlines five recovery objectives for the Barrens Willow: 1) to assess and monitor the status of the natural population; 2) to assess range and population dynamics of the natural population; 3) to define threats and limiting factors and mitigate controllable ones; 4) lessen to the extent possible additional habitat loss and degradation due to human activities; 5) to implement a stewardship program with local residents and targeted groups.  Highest priority actions are surveys, monitoring and critical habitat protection.  Some of these actions, as well as others, such as habitat stewardship, are already underway.