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Recovery Strategy for the Eastern Prickly Pear Cactus (Opuntia humifusa) in Canada

9. Activities Likely to Result in the Destruction of Critical Habitat

Examples of activities that are likely to result in the destruction of Eastern Prickly Pear Cactus critical habitat are listed here together with the effect they are likely to have on the critical habitat (Table 3).

Table 3: Examples of activities likely to result in the destruction of Eastern Prickly Pear Cactus critical habitat in Point Pelee National Park and Fish Point Provincial Nature Reserve.

ActivityEffects on Critical Habitat
Construction, expansion or maintenance of new or existing infrastructure (e.g. buildings).Loss of habitat or excessive shading of habitat
Construction, expansion or maintenance of new or existing roads, trails or footpaths.Loss of habitat
Use of motorized vehicles in the critical habitat without following Best Management Practices for this activity (BMPs).Disturbance of sand preventing seedling establishment
Excessive impacts (e.g. trampling) from off-trail activities.Disturbance of sand preventing seedling establishment
Deliberate introduction of non-indigenous, invasive species in or adjacent to critical habitat.Loss of habitat through competition or by shading
Installation of any structure that interferes with the natural coastal processes that affect the critical habitat.Interruption of natural processes that create or maintain critical habitat

Note that the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (1992, c. 37), A Class Environmental Assessment for Provincial Parks and Conservation Reserves (2005) and the Ontario Environmental Assessment Act (R.S.O. 1990 c. E.18) are in place to ensure that projects do not cause significant adverse environmental effects on federal, Ontario provincial or Ontario private lands respectively and in doing so provide for protection, conservation and wise management of the environment.