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Wolverine (Gulo gulo)

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COSEWIC
Assessment Summary

 

Assessment Summary – May 2003

Common name:

Wolverine (Eastern Population)

Scientific name:
Gulo gulo

Status:
Endangered

Reason for designation:
There have been no verified reports of this species in Quebec or Labrador for about 25 years, but there are unconfirmed reports almost every year. Any remaining population would be extremely small and therefore at high risk of extinction from stochastic events such as incidental harvest. The apparent lack of recovery despite the recent high local abundance of caribou suggests that this population may be extirpated.

Occurrence:
Quebec, Newfoundland-Labrador

Status history:
Canadian range considered as one population in April 1982 and designated Special Concern. Split into two populations in April 1989 (Western population and Eastern population). Eastern population was designated Endangered in April 1989 and confirmed in May 2003. Last assessment was based on an update status report.

 

Assessment Summary – May 2003

Common name:

Wolverine (Western population)

Scientific name:
Gulo gulo

Status:
Special Concern

Reason for designation:
Estimated total population size exceeds 13 000 mature individuals. Declines have been reported in Alberta and parts of British Columbia and Ontario. A distinct subspecies may be extirpated from Vancouver Island. Many pelts used locally are not included in official statistics, and harvest levels may be underreported. There is no evidence, however, of a decline in harvest. There are no data on overall population trends other than those provided by local knowledge and harvest monitoring programs. This species' habitat is increasingly fragmented by industrial activity, especially in the southern part of its range, and increased motorized access will increase harvest pressure and other disturbances. The species has a low reproductive rate and requires vast secure areas to maintain viable populations.

Occurrence:
Yukon Territory, Northwest Territories, Nunavut, British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario

Status history:
Canadian range considered as one population in April 1982 and designated Special Concern. Split into two populations in April 1989 (Western population and Eastern populations). Western population was designated Special Concern in April 1989 and confirmed in May 2003. Last assessment was based on an update status report.