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Recovery Strategy for White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) in Canada [Proposed]

8.5 Upper Columbia River Population

The current distribution of the Columbia River population resides in the upper Columbia River from Revelstoke (REV) Dam to Grand Coulee Dam (Washington), as well as in the lower Kootenay River from its confluence with the Columbia River to Brilliant Dam (Figure 3). Studies conducted on Columbia River white sturgeon are divided among the following population components: i) Transboundary Reach, 56 km of riverine habitat located between HLK Dam and the Canada-U.S. border, including the small section of river in the lower Kootenay River below Brilliant Dam; ii) Arrow Lakes Reservoir (ALR), 230 km of riverine and lacustrine habitat located from REV to HLK Dams; and, iii) Roosevelt Reach (FDR), from the U.S. border downstream. The transboundary nature of this population requires that recovery efforts be coordinated across multiple jurisdictions. Since SARA is Canadian legislation, only critical habitat identification in Canada is addressed.

Remnant population components may also exist upstream of the ALR component (i.e. between REV and Mica Dams and in the Kinbasket Reservoir) but investigations have not captured white sturgeon at this time. Given the large size of these reservoirs, the failure to catch a white sturgeon does not necessarily preclude their existence, but would suggest that population densities are very low (RL&L Environmental Services Ltd. 2000b).

The following sections discuss the ALR component (Table 12) and the transboundary component (Table 13) separately.

Table 12. Summary of information base for white sturgeon critical habitats in the ALR area of the Columbia River. An empty cell means that the life stage does not consistently use the habitat. The table has two main columns from left to right: Location (see Figure 28 for basin overview) and Confirmed (Checkmark), Suspected (S), or Possible (question mark) Use by Life Stage and Degree of Use (H=High, M=Moderate, L=Low). The latter column has seven sub-columns from left to right: Spawn, Yolk sac larvae/feeding larvae, Early juvenile, Late Juvenile and Adult, Overwintering, Staging, and Overall assessment. Directly below column headings are five rows, read from left to right.

Row 1: Columbia River adjacent to Revelstoke Golf Course, checkmark (M), S (L), empty cell, checkmark (L), empty cell, empty cell, Critical. Row 2: Big Eddy, empty cell, question mark, empty cell, checkmark (L), empty cell, checkmark (M), Critical. Row 3: Salmon Rocks, empty cell, question mark, empty cell, checkmark (L), empty cell, checkmark (M), Critical. Row 4: Beaton Reach, empty cell, empty cell, checkmark (M), checkmark (H), checkmark (H), empty cell, Critical. Row 5: Narrow Burton Reach, empty cell, empty cell, S (L), checkmark (M), empty cell, empty cell, Critical.

Table 12. Summary of information base for white sturgeon critical habitats in the ALR area of the Columbia River. A blank cell means that the life stage does not consistently use the habitat.
Location
(see Figure 28 for basin overview)
SpawnYolk Sac larvae and Feeding LarvaeEarly JuvenileLate Juvenile and AdultOver winteringStagingOverall Assessment
Columbia River adjacent to Revelstoke Golf Course√ (M)S (L) √ (L)  Critical
Big Eddy ? √ (L) √ (M)Critical
Salmon Rocks ? √ (L) √ (M)Critical
Beaton Reach  √ (M)√ (H)√ (H) Critical
Narrow Burton Reach  S (L)√ (M)  Critical

Confirmed (√), Suspected (S), or Possible (?) Use by Life Stage and Degree of Use (H=High, M=Moderate, L=Low)

Table 13. Summary of information base for white sturgeon critical habitats in the transboundary area of the Columbia River. An empty cell means that the life stage does not consistently use the habitat. The table has two main columns from left to right: Location (see Figure 28 for basin overview) and Confirmed (checkmark), Suspected (S), or Possible (question mark) Use by Life Stage and Degree of Use (H=High, M=Moderate, L=Low). The latter column has seven sub-columns from left to right: Spawn, Yolk sac larvae/feeding larvae, Early juvenile, Late Juvenile and Adult, Overwintering, Staging, and Overall Assessment. Directly below column headings are seven rows, read from left to right.

Row 1: Robson Reach, checkmark (H), question mark (H), checkmark (H), checkmark (H), checkmark (H), checkmark (M), Critical. Row 2: Kootenay Eddy, empty cell, empty cell, checkmark (M), checkmark (H), checkmark (M), checkmark (L-M), Critical. Row 3: Fort Shepherd Eddy, empty cell, empty cell, checkmark (H), checkmark (H), checkmark (H), checkmark (H), Critical. Row 4: Waneta Eddy, empty cell, empty cell, checkmark (H), checkmark (H), checkmark (H), checkmark (H), Critical. Row 5: Pend d’Oreille – Columbia Confluence, checkmark (H), checkmark (H), checkmark (L), checkmark (M), empty cell, checkmark (H), Critical. Row 6: Bridge Hole, empty cell, empty cell, S (L), checkmark (M), checkmark (M), empty cell, Critical. Row 7: Brilliant Tailrace, empty cell, empty cell, S (L), checkmark (M), checkmark (M), empty cell, Critical.

Table 13.  Summary of information base for white sturgeon critical habitats in the transboundary area of the Columbia River. A blank cell means that the life stage does not consistently use the habitat.
Location
(see Figure 28 for basin overview)
SpawnYolk Sac larvae and Feeding LarvaeEarly JuvenileLate Juvenile and AdultOver winteringStagingOverall Assessment
Robson Reach√ (H)?(H)√ (H)√ (H)√ (H)√ (M)Critical
Kootenay Eddy  √ (M)√ (H)√ (M)√ (L-M)Critical
Fort Shepherd Eddy  √ (H)√ (H)√ (H)√ (H)Critical
Waneta Eddy  √ (H)√ (H)√ (H)√ (H)Critical
Pend d’Oreille – Columbia Confluence√ (H)√ (H)√ (L)√ (M) √ (H)Critical
Bridge Hole  S (L)√ (M)√ (M) Critical
Brilliant Tailrace  S (L)√ (M)√ (M) Critical

Confirmed (√),Suspected (S), or Possible (?) Use by Life Stage and Degree of Use (H=High, M=Moderate, L=Low)

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8.5.1 Biophysical Functions, Features and Attributes of Critical Habitat – Upper Columbia River Population

Tables 14 and 15 summarize the critical habitat function(s), features and attributes, to the extent possible, for the Upper Columbia River population of white sturgeon.

Table 14. This table provides a summary of the biophysical features, functions, attributes and locations of critical habitat for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon in Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The first column describes the geographic locations of the critical habitat, which encompass areas within the Upper Columbia River system where white sturgeon reside. The second column indicates the life stage that uses each respective critical habitat area. The third column indicates the function that the particular life stage undertakes in each area. The fourth column describes the critical habitat feature that provides the function, and the fifth column details the attributes that the critical habitat feature must have in order to provide the biological function needed to support Upper Columbia River white sturgeon survival or recovery. The final column contains notes.

Table 14. Summary of the biophysical functions, features, attributes and locations of critical habitat for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon in Arrow Lakes Reservoir.
Geographic LocationLife StageFunctionFeature(s)Attribute(s)Notes
Columbia River adjacent to Revelstoke Golf CourseYolk Sac LarvaeRearingHiding locations in the vicinity of spawning habitat
  • Coarse substrates, gravel to cobble providing interstitial spaces for hiding
  • Rearing currently occurs at a temperature range of 10-12ºC, but the ideal is 12-18ºC
  • Wetted conditions required; yolk sac larvae are unable to leave the area at this stage

Yolk sac larvae have been captured in the area.

Feeding larvae have not been collected at this location, likely downstream.

This is the only confirmed spawning area for white sturgeon in the mid- Columbia River between REV Dam and HLK Dam. Spawning has been detected in ~50% of years at this location since 1999 with at least 2 spawning events estimated in those years when spawning has been documented.

Based on the locations of captured eggs, low flows during years with low summer ALR levels could harm incubating eggs at night on bars downstream of the spawning area. Monitoring is ongoing and observations of egg dewatering have occurred once in 10 years. This was prior to implementation of the REV minimum flow which has increased wetted area by 37% and may reduce risk to eggs in this area. In years with high ALR summer levels, incubating eggs would be within backwater effect of the reservoir and may be more vulnerable to predation.

Rearing areas are used beginning in mid-August.

Staging areas are used from June to August.

Spawning and incubation areas are used from Mid-July – early September.

AdultStagingHydraulic conditions particular to this location, see attributes
  • Velocities greater than 0.8m/ sec-1
Spawning and IncubationHydraulic conditions particular to this location, see attributes
  • Spawning and incubation occurs at a temperature range of 10-12ºC, but the ideal is 12-18ºC
  • Thalweg depths of 4-5m required in spawning areas
  • Coarse substrates, gravel to cobble providing interstitial spaces for incubation
  • Mean water column velocities at most spawning sites are typically greater than greater than 0.8m/ sec-1
Big Eddy and Salmon RocksAdultFeeding

Food availability often associated with:
 
Deep pools

Eddies

Riffles

  • Lower velocity holding areas
  • Pools at Big Eddy greater than 20m depth; Salmon Rocks would rarely achieve that depth
  • Source of fish and invertebrates, preferably salmonids

Larvae use of this area is unknown.

This location represents areas selected by pre- spawning females (and possibly pre-spawning males).

There is transitional use by juveniles released in area, but they move quickly downstream post-release.

Feeding areas are used primarily in summer.

Staging areas are used from June to August.

StagingHolding areas near spawning habitat
  • Lower velocity holding areas
  • Pools greater than 20m depths
  • Changes in flow or temperature conditions during the staging period have been shown to impact spawning behaviour and success in other sturgeon species.
Beaton ReachLate Juvenile and AdultFeeding

Food availability often associated with:

Depositional Area1

  • Depths greater than 10m
  • Lower velocity holding areas
  • Source of fish and invertebrates, preferably salmonids

There is a suggestion that an upstream feeding movement by some adults occurs in spring and early summer as the reservoir fills.

Individuals (primarily juveniles) tend to select the reservoir-river interface area.

Summer temperatures as high as 13ºC in the main area of use for juveniles.

Telemetry data suggests use of river thalweg habitat with no indication of shallow water habitat use, monitoring is ongoing.

Winter flows and water temperatures have increased since regulation of the river. It is not known whether this has increased or decreased the suitability of overwintering habitats.

Feeding areas are used all year.

Overwintering areas are used from Nov - Mar

OverwinteringDepositional Area1
  • Depths greater than 10m
  • Velocity greater than 0.5m/sec-1

 

Narrow Burton ReachEarly and Late JuvenilePotential Rearing
(suitable for rearing and necessary for recovery)
Feature(s) not confirmed
  • Attribute(s) not confirmed

A juvenile has been detected in this area, but the extent of habitat use is unclear. Juvenile use is only suspected within this area.

Rearing areas are used all year.

Feeding areas are used all year.

AdultFeeding

Food availability often associated with:

Depositional Area1

Confluence with tributary that provides spawning habitat for salmonids in spring and fall

  • Lower velocity holding areas
  • Source of fish and invertebrates, preferably salmonids

1 Depositional area– typically lower velocity areas where fish can rest and prey species may congregate; often in close proximity to confluences with other water bodies providing further access to food sources

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Table 15. This table provides a summary of the biophysical features, functions, attributes and locations of critical habitat for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon in the Columbia Transboundary Reach. The first column describes the geographic locations of the critical habitat, which encompass areas within the Upper Columbia River system where white sturgeon reside. The second column indicates the life stage that uses each respective critical habitat area. The third column indicates the function that the particular life stage undertakes in each area. The fourth column describes the critical habitat feature that provides the function, and the fifth column details the attributes that the critical habitat feature must have in order to provide the biological function needed to support Upper Columbia River white sturgeon survival or recovery. The final column contains notes.

Table 15. Summary of the biophysical functions, features, attributes and locations of critical habitat for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon in the Columbia Transboundary Reach.
Geographic LocationLife StageFunctionFeature(s)Attribute(s)Notes

Pend d’Oreille – Columbia Confluence to US Border

Waneta Eddy

Yolk Sac LarvaeRearingHiding locations in the vicinity of spawning habitat
  • Gravel to cobble substrate with interstitial spaces
  • Optimal temperatures for this phase are between 14-18ºC
  • Wetted conditions required; yolk sac larvae are unable to leave the area at this stage

This is an important confirmed spawning area for white sturgeon in the Columbia River between HLK Dam and the US border. Spawning has been detected at this location since monitoring began in 1993 with an estimated minimum of 3 to 12 spawning events per year. Spawning has occurred over a wide variety of flow conditions (no correlation with flow).

Majority of feeding larvae habitat downstream in the US.

Hydraulic conditions in the Waneta Eddy / Pend d’Oreille confluence area show complex responses to flow and can vary dramatically depending on the combined effects of flow in the Columbia and Pend d’Oreille Rivers.

Hydraulic modelling indicates that the majority of egg incubation area is located upstream of the border and within the influence of both the Pend d'Oreille and Columbia rivers. 

Suitable flow conditions for egg survival to hatching are present in most years throughout the majority of the spawning period.

Rearing areas are used from mid-June to mid-August.

Feeding areas are used all year.

Staging areas are used November to July.

Spawning and incubation areas are used from June to early August.

Feeding LarvaeRearing
Feeding

Fluvial habitat downstream of spawning sites

And food availability often associated with the above.

 

  • Water temperatures are optimal for feeding larvae between 14-18ºC
  • Source of benthic invertebrates and/or benthic dwelling fish
Early JuvenileRearing
Feeding

Hydraulic conditions particular to this location utilized, see attributes

And food availability often associated with the above.

  • Source of benthic invertebrates and/or small benthic dwelling fish
  • Depths greater than 2m
  •  0.1 to 1.2 m/sec-1 mean column velocity, and near-substrate velocity of 0.1 to 0.8 m/sec-1
Late Juvenile and AdultFeedingHydraulic conditions particular to this location utilized by adults, see attributes
  • Opportunistic feeders.
  • Source of fish and invertebrates, preferably salmonids
  • Deeper water areas greater than 15m that have lower velocities relative to mainstem flows
AdultStagingHydraulic conditions particular to this location utilized by adults, see attributes
  • Deep, low velocity habitat with ability to access higher velocity areas
Spawning and IncubationHydraulic conditions particular to this location utilized by adults, see attributes
  • Flow conditions - descending limb of freshet
  • Optimal temperature for incubation is 14-18ºC
  • Coarse substrates, gravel to cobble providing interstitial spaces
  • Current substrates not optimal, embeddedness limits suitability
  • Mean water column velocities at most spawning sites are greater than 0.8m/ sec-1

Kootenay Eddy

Fort Shepherd Eddy

 

Early JuvenileRearing
Feeding

Hydraulic conditions particular to this location, see attributes

And food availability often associated with the above.

  • Source of benthic invertebrates and/or small benthic dwelling fish
  • Depths greater than 2m
  • 0.1 to 1.2 m/sec-1 mean column velocity, and near-substrate velocity of 0.1 to 0.8 m/sec-1

Eggs and larvae have been detected downstream of the Kinnard Bridge Eddy (rkm 11-20), but the exact location is unknown. Future identification of the spawning area may lead to inclusion of egg and larval stages for this location.

Rearing areas are used from mid-June to mid-August.

Feeding areas are used all year.

Staging areas are used November to July.

Overwintering areas are used from November to March.

Late Juvenile and AdultFeeding

Food availability often associated with:

Depositional Area1

  • Lower velocity areas relative to thalweg
  • Food source such as rainbow trout, kokanee, mountain whitefish and their eggs.
  • Shallow water habitats adjacent to confluence with tributary that provides spawning habitat for salmonids
OverwinteringDeep pools
  • Depths greater than 20m,
  • Lower velocity areas, 0.5 m/ sec-1
AdultStagingHydraulic conditions particular to this location, see attributes
  • Lower velocity holding areas
  • Pools greater than 20m depth
Robson ReachYolk Sac LarvaeRearingHiding locations in the vicinity of spawning habitat
  • Gravel to cobble substrate with interstitial spaces, ideal
  • Optimal temperatures for this phase are between 14-18ºC
  • Wetted conditions required; yolk sac larvae are unable to leave the area at this stage
  • Current substrates are not optimal

Spawning has recently been detected in the vicinity of ALGS. Monitoring is ongoing to further describe spawning frequency and duration at this location and to characterize substrates.

Entrained mysids are an important food source in Robson Reach, though a non-native species.

Rearing areas are used from did June to mid-August.

Feeding areas are used all year.

Staging areas are used November to July.

Overwintering areas are used from November to March.

Feeding LarvaeRearing
Feeding

Fluvial habitat downstream of spawning sites

And food availability often associated with the above.

  • Water temperatures are optimal for feeding larvae between 14 and 18ºC
  • Source of benthic invertebrates and/or small benthic dwelling fish
Early JuvenileRearing
Feeding

Hydraulic conditions particular to this location, see attributes

And food availability often associated with the above.

  • Diverse source of fish and invertebrates, preferably salmonids
  • Depths greater than 2m
  •  0.1 to 1.2 m/sec-1 mean column velocity, and near-substrate velocity of 0.1 to 0.8 m/sec-1
Late Juvenile and AdultFeeding

Food availability often associated with:

Depositional Area1

 

  • Lower velocity areas relative to thalweg
  • Deeper areas, such as HLK Eddy
  • Food source such as rainbow trout, kokanee, mountain whitefish and their eggs
  • Shallow water habitats adjacent to confluence with tributary that provides spawning habitat for salmonids
OverwinteringDeep pools
  • Generally depths greater than 20m, however shallower depths may be used
AdultStagingHydraulic conditions particular to this location, see attributes
  • Deep, low velocity habitat
Spawning and IncubationHydraulic conditions particular to this location see attributes
  • Flow conditions – spawning occurs during the high summer release period
  • Optimal temperature range for incubation is 14-18ºC
  • Excavated rock channel with varying sized substrate
  • Mean water column velocities at most spawning sites are typically greater than 0.8m/sec-1

Bridge Hole

Brilliant Tailrace

Late Juvenile and AdultFeedingHydraulic conditions particular to this location that provide food, see attributes
  • Lower velocity areas relative to thalweg
  • Source of food, such as entrained fish through the dam and resident fish populations (ex. kokanee and whitefish)

Disproportionate use by fish that preferentially reside within the lower Kootenay River.  

There is minimal use of the plunge pool / tailrace area during periods of spill.

Feeding areas are used all year.

Low overwintering use from November to March.

Overwintering

1 Depositional area– typically lower velocity areas where fish can rest and prey species may congregate; often in close proximity to confluences with other water bodies providing further access to food sources

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8.5.2 Geographic Identification of Critical Habitat – Upper Columbia River Population

The following locations of the critical habitat’s functions, features and attributes have been identified using the critical habitat parcel approach. Critical habitat downstream of existing hydroelectric facilities does not include the physical structure of the dam, although it may include anthropogenic features such as rip rap downstream of the facilities.

Figure 28. Reference map for locations of Upper Columbia River white sturgeon critical habitats.

Figure 28. This is a map of the Upper Columbia River showing an overview of critical habitat locations. Critical habitat includes aquatic habitat features and attributes that Upper Columbia River white sturgeon use to carry out life functions. Nine locations in the vicinity of Revelstoke, Castlegar and Trail are labelled on a map of British Columbia as follows: Columbia River adjacent to Revelstoke Golf Course, Salmon Rocks/Big Eddy, Beaton Reach, Narrow Burton Reach, Robson Reach, Bridge Hole, Brilliant Tailrace, Kootenay Eddy, Ft. Shepherd Eddy, Waneta Eddy/Pend d’Oreille River Confluence. A scale and legend are provided along with an inset map showing locations are primarily in the south-eastern corner of British Columbia. The map is oriented in a “north is up” direction.

map

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Figure 29. Map of critical habitat for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon: Columbia River adjacent to Revelstoke Golf Course, Big Eddy and Salmon Rocks.

Figure 29. Figure 29 is a map of a section of Arrow Lakes Reservoir, British Columbia, showing the critical habitat locations of Big Eddy, Salmon Rocks, and the Columbia River adjacent to Revelstoke Golf Course. The map depicts three polygons that have been identified as critical habitat for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon. In the identified polygons, critical habitat includes aquatic habitat features and attributes that Upper Columbia River white sturgeon use to carry out life functions. The coordinates denoting various points of the polygons’ boundaries are listed in Table 16. The critical habitat polygons in the Big Eddy, Salmon Rocks, and the Columbia River adjacent to Revelstoke Golf Course map are also labeled with codes that correspond to codes used to identify the polygons in Table 16. A scale of 1:29,000 and legend are provided along with an inset map showing locations are primarily in the Kootenay region of British Columbia. The map is oriented in a “north is up” direction.

map

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Figure 30. Map of critical habitat for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon: Beaton Reach.

Figure 30. Figure 30 is a map of a section of Arrow Lakes Reservoir, British Columbia, showing the critical habitat location Beaton Reach. The map depicts a polygon that has been identified as critical habitat for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon. In the identified polygon, critical habitat includes aquatic habitat features and attributes that Upper Columbia River white sturgeon use to carry out life functions. The coordinates denoting various points of the polygon’s boundary are listed in Table 16. The critical habitat polygon in the Beaton Reach map is also labeled with codes that correspond to codes used to identify the polygon in Table 16. A scale of 1:73,000 and legend are provided along with an inset map showing locations are primarily in the Kootenay region of British Columbia. The map is oriented in a “north is up” direction.

map

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Figure 31. Map of critical habitat for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon: Narrow Burton Reach.

Figure 31. Figure 31 is a map of a section of Arrow Lakes Reservoir, British Columbia, showing the critical habitat location Narrow Burton Reach. The map depicts a polygon that has been identified as critical habitat for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon. In the identified polygon, critical habitat includes aquatic habitat features and attributes that Upper Columbia River white sturgeon use to carry out life functions. The coordinates denoting various points of the polygon’s boundary are listed in Table 16. The critical habitat polygon in the Narrow Burton Reach map is also labeled with codes that correspond to codes used to identify the polygon in Table 16. A scale of 1:73,000 and legend are provided along with an inset map showing locations are primarily in the Kootenay region of British Columbia. The map is oriented in a “north is up” direction.

map

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Figure 32. Map of critical habitat for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon: Robson Reach.

Figure 32. Figure 32 is a map of a section of the Columbia River, British Columbia, showing the critical habitat location Robson Reach. The map depicts a polygon that has been identified as critical habitat for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon. In the identified polygon, critical habitat includes aquatic habitat features and attributes that Upper Columbia River white sturgeon use to carry out life functions. The coordinates denoting various points of the polygon’s boundary are listed in Table 16. The critical habitat polygon in the Robson Reach map is also labeled with codes that correspond to codes used to identify the polygon in Table 16. A scale of 1:55,000 and legend are provided along with an inset map showing locations are primarily in the Kootenay region of British Columbia. The map is oriented in a “north is up” direction.

map

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Figure 33. Map of critical habitat for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon: Kootenay Eddy, Bridge Hole and Brilliant Tailrace.

Figure 33. Figure 33 is a map of a section of the Lower Kootenay River, British Columbia, showing the critical habitat locations of Kootenay Eddy, Bridge Hole and Brilliant Tailrace. The map depicts three polygons that have been identified as critical habitat for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon. In the identified polygons, critical habitat includes aquatic habitat features and attributes that Upper Columbia River white sturgeon use to carry out life functions. The coordinates denoting various points of the polygons’ boundaries are listed in Table 16. The critical habitat polygons in the Kootenay Eddy, Bridge Hole and Brilliant Tailrace map are also labeled with codes that correspond to codes used to identify the polygons in Table 16. A scale of 1:16,000 and legend are provided along with an inset map showing locations are primarily in the Kootenay region of British Columbia. The map is oriented in a “north is up” direction.

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Figure 34. Map of critical habitat for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon: Fort Shepherd Eddy.

Figure 34. Figure 34 is a map of a section of the Columbia River, British Columbia, showing the critical habitat location Fort Shepherd Eddy. The map depicts a polygon that has been identified as critical habitat for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon. In the identified polygon, critical habitat includes aquatic habitat features and attributes that Upper Columbia River white sturgeon use to carry out life functions. The coordinates denoting various points of the polygon’s boundary are listed in Table 16. The critical habitat polygon in the Fort Shepherd Eddy map is also labeled with codes that correspond to codes used to identify the polygon in Table 16. A scale of 1:7,000 and legend are provided along with an inset map showing locations are primarily in the Kootenay region of British Columbia. The map is oriented in a “north is up” direction.

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Figure 35.  Map of critical habitat for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon: Waneta Eddy and Pend d’Oreille confluence with the Columbia River.

Figure 35. Figure 35 is a map of a section of the Columbia River, British Columbia, showing the critical habitat locations Waneta Eddy and the Pend d’Oreille confluence with the Columbia River. The map depicts two polygons that have been identified as critical habitat for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon. In the identified polygons, critical habitat includes aquatic habitat features and attributes that Upper Columbia River white sturgeon use to carry out life functions. The coordinates denoting various points of the polygons’ boundaries are listed in Table 16. The critical habitat polygons in the Waneta Eddy and Pend d’Oreille confluence with the Columbia River map are also labeled with codes that correspond to codes used to identify the polygons in Table 16. A scale of 1:9,000 and legend are provided along with an inset map showing locations are primarily in the Kootenay region of British Columbia. The map is oriented in a “north is up” direction.

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Table 16. Geospatial Coordinates of Critical Habitat Areas for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon. A footnote on the word “coordinates” in the previous sentence states the following: Coordinate points were digitized using various orthophotos provided by Fisheries and Oceans Canada. The resolution of the various orthophotos varied significantly - ranging from 0.2 m cell size to 24 m cell size. This should be taken into consideration when evaluating the accuracy of the coordinates associated with these points. For geographic coordinate points situated at the wetted boundary, this boundary is meant to represent the annual high water mark (Hatfield et al., 2012). Note: For the Canadian portion of the Columbia River, river kilometres start at Hugh L. Keenleyside Dam (HLK) Dam in Castlegar and increase moving downstream to the Canada/U.S. border (HLK = 0 km, Canada/U.S. border ~ 57.0 km). River kilometres also increase on the upstream side of HLK Dam, starting at 0 km at the dam and increasing to the headwaters of the Columbia River.

The table has eight columns read left to right: Critical Habitat Name, Coordinate Marker, Waterbody, River Kilometer, Latitude (DD), Longitude (DD), Latitude (DMS), Longitude (DMS). DD refers to Decimal Degrees and DMS refers to Degrees, Minutes, Seconds. Directly below the column headings there are 63 rows. Nine rows correspond to the Columbia – Bridge Hole area, four to the Columbia – Brilliant Tailrace area, four to the Fort Shepherd Eddy area, five to the Columbia – Pend d’Oreille Confluence area, four to the Columbia – Robson Reach area, four to the Columbia – Waneta Eddy area, six to the Columbia (ALR) – Beaton Reach area, three to the Columbia (ALR) – Big Eddy area, four to the Columbia (ALR) – Columbia River adjacent to Revelstoke Golf Course area, four to the Columbia (ALR) – Narrow Burton Reach, and four to the Columbia (ALR) – Salmon Rocks area.

Table 16. Geographic Coordinates13 of Critical Habitat Areas for Upper Columbia River white sturgeon.
Critical Habitat NameCoordinate MarkerWaterbodyRiver KilometerLatitude (DD)Longitude (DD)Latitude (DMS)Longitude (DMS)
Columbia - Bridge HoleCr-BH1Lower Kootenay River 49.318-117.62849° 19' 4" N117° 37' 42" W
Columbia - Bridge HoleCr-BH2Lower Kootenay River 49.318-117.62849° 19' 4" N117° 37' 41" W
Columbia - Bridge HoleCr-BH3Lower Kootenay River 49.318-117.62949° 19' 3" N117° 37' 43" W
Columbia - Bridge HoleCr-BH4Lower Kootenay River 49.317-117.62949° 19' 2" N117° 37' 44" W
Columbia - Bridge HoleCr-BH5Lower Kootenay River 49.317-117.63049° 19' 0" N117° 37' 48" W
Columbia - Bridge HoleCr-BH6Lower Kootenay River 49.317-117.63049° 19' 2" N117° 37' 49" W
Columbia - Bridge HoleCr-BH7Lower Kootenay River 49.317-117.63049° 19' 2" N117° 37' 47" W
Columbia - Bridge HoleCr-BH8Lower Kootenay River 49.317-117.63049° 19' 2" N117° 37' 46" W
Columbia - Bridge HoleCr-BH9Lower Kootenay River 49.318-117.62949° 19' 4" N117° 37' 44" W
Columbia - Brilliant TailraceCr-BTR1Lower Kootenay River 49.324-117.62049° 19' 27" N117° 37' 13" W
Columbia - Brilliant TailraceCr-BTR2Lower Kootenay River 49.324-117.62049° 19' 25" N117° 37' 11" W
Columbia - Brilliant TailraceCr-BTR3Lower Kootenay River 49.321-117.62249° 19' 17" N117° 37' 19" W
Columbia - Brilliant TailraceCr-BTR4Lower Kootenay River 49.322-117.62349° 19' 18" N117° 37' 23" W
Columbia - Fort Shepherd EddyCr-FSE1Columbia River 49.028-117.60349° 1' 40" N117° 36' 11" W
Columbia - Fort Shepherd EddyCr-FSE2Columbia River 49.027-117.60649° 1' 35" N117° 36' 22" W
Columbia - Fort Shepherd EddyCr-FSE3Columbia River 49.032-117.61549° 1' 55" N117° 36' 53" W
Columbia - Fort Shepherd EddyCr-FSE4Columbia River 49.033-117.61349° 2' 0" N117° 36' 45" W
Columbia - Kootenay EddyCr-KE1Lower Kootenay River 49.316-117.64849° 18' 58" N117° 38' 52" W
Columbia - Kootenay EddyCr-KE2Lower Kootenay River 49.314-117.64949° 18' 52" N117° 38' 58" W
Columbia - Kootenay EddyCr-KE3Lower Kootenay River 49.314-117.65349° 18' 52" N117° 39' 11" W
Columbia - Kootenay EddyCr-KE4Lower Kootenay River 49.317-117.65249° 19' 0" N117° 39' 7" W
Columbia - Pend d'Oreille ConfluenceCr-POC1Pend d'Oreille River 49.005-117.61949° 0' 17" N117° 37' 7" W
Columbia - Pend d'Oreille ConfluenceCr-POC2Pend d'Oreille River 49.003-117.61949° 0' 12" N117° 37' 7" W
Columbia - Pend d'Oreille ConfluenceCr-POC3Columbia River 49.001-117.63049° 0' 3" N117° 37' 46" W
Columbia - Pend d'Oreille ConfluenceCr-POC4Columbia River 49.001-117.63349° 0' 3" N117° 38' 0" W
Columbia - Pend d'Oreille ConfluenceCr-POC5Columbia River 49.002-117.63149° 0' 7" N117° 37' 52" W
Columbia - Pend d'Oreille ConfluenceCr- POC6Columbia River 49.003-117.63049° 0' 11" N117° 37' 46" W
Columbia - Pend d'Oreille ConfluenceCr-POC7Columbia River 49.004-117.62749° 0' 13" N117° 37' 36" W
Columbia - Robson ReachCr-RR1Columbia River 49.332-117.66549° 19' 56" N117° 39' 55" W
Columbia - Robson ReachCr-RR2Columbia River 49.330-117.67049° 19' 48" N117° 40' 12" W
Columbia - Robson ReachCr-RR3Columbia River 49.338-117.77049° 20' 16" N117° 46' 12" W
Columbia - Robson ReachCr-RR4Columbia River 49.341-117.77249° 20' 28" N117° 46' 19" W
Columbia - Waneta EddyCr-WE1Columbia River 49.006-117.62249° 0' 23" N117° 37' 19" W
Columbia - Waneta EddyCr-WE2Columbia River 49.007-117.62049° 0' 24" N117° 37' 13" W
Columbia - Waneta EddyCr-WE3Columbia River 49.007-117.61849° 0' 26" N117° 37' 6" W
Columbia - Waneta EddyCr- WE4Columbia River 49.008-117.61649° 0' 28" N117° 36' 58" W
Columbia - Waneta EddyCr- WE5Columbia River 49.005-117.61949° 0' 17" N117° 37' 7" W
Columbia - Waneta EddyCr- WE6Columbia River 49.004-117.62549° 0' 15" N117° 37' 28" W
Columbia (ALR) - Beaton ReachCr-BR1Upper Arrow Lake188.050.698-117.98450° 41' 53" N117° 59' 1" W
Columbia (ALR) - Beaton ReachCr-BR2Upper Arrow Lake188.050.706-117.94850° 42' 23" N117° 56' 51" W
Columbia (ALR) - Beaton ReachCr-BR3Upper Arrow Lake6.550.703-117.84850° 42' 11" N117° 50' 53" W
Columbia (ALR) - Beaton ReachCr-BR4Upper Arrow Lake6.550.691-117.83850° 41' 29" N117° 50' 17" W
Columbia (ALR) - Beaton ReachCr-BR5Upper Arrow Lake180.050.652-117.87650° 39' 7" N117° 52' 33" W
Columbia (ALR) - Beaton ReachCr-BR6Upper Arrow Lake180.050.634-117.92150° 38' 3" N117° 55' 14" W
Columbia (ALR) - Big EddyCr-BE1Columbia River 51.006-118.23951° 0' 20" N118° 14' 22" W
Columbia (ALR) - Big EddyCr-BE2Columbia River 51.005-118.23551° 0' 19" N118° 14' 7" W
Columbia (ALR) - Big EddyCr-BE3Columbia River 51.002-118.23551° 0' 9" N118° 14' 7" W
Columbia (ALR) - Columbia River adjacent to Revelstoke Golf CourseCr-RGC1Columbia River232.851.017-118.22651° 1' 1" N118° 13' 33" W
Columbia (ALR) - Columbia River adjacent to Revelstoke Golf CourseCr-RGC2Columbia River232.851.016-118.22451° 0' 57" N118° 13' 25" W
Columbia (ALR) - Columbia River adjacent to Revelstoke Golf CourseCr-RGC3Columbia River231.651.009-118.23651° 0' 33" N118° 14' 9" W
Columbia (ALR) - Columbia River adjacent to Revelstoke Golf CourseCr-RGC4Columbia River231.651.009-118.23951° 0' 34" N118° 14' 21" W
Columbia (ALR) - Narrow Burton ReachCr-NBR1Columbia River99.050.001-117.91050° 0' 5" N117° 54' 36" W
Columbia (ALR) - Narrow Burton ReachCr-NBR2Columbia River99.050.000-117.88850° 0' 2" N117° 53' 15" W
Columbia (ALR) - Narrow Burton ReachCr-NBR3Lower Arrow Lake95.549.970-117.90449° 58' 11" N117° 54' 14" W
Columbia (ALR) - Narrow Burton ReachCr-NBR4Lower Arrow Lake95.549.978-117.93149° 58' 41" N117° 55' 52" W
Columbia (ALR) - Salmon RocksCr-SR1Upper Arrow Lake226.850.983-118.21450° 58' 58" N118° 12' 52" W
Columbia (ALR) - Salmon RocksCr-SR2Upper Arrow Lake226.850.983-118.21250° 58' 58" N118° 12' 42" W
Columbia (ALR) - Salmon RocksCr-SR3Upper Arrow Lake226.150.975-118.20950° 58' 32" N118° 12' 32" W
Columbia (ALR) - Salmon RocksCr-SR4Upper Arrow Lake226.150.975-118.21150° 58' 31" N118° 12' 41" W

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13 Coordinate points were digitized using various orthophotos provided by Fisheries and Oceans Canada. The resolution of the various orthophotos varied significantly - ranging from 0.2 m cell size to 24 m cell size. This should be taken into consideration when evaluating the accuracy of the coordinates associated with these points. For geographic coordinate points situated at the wetted boundary, this boundary is meant to represent the annual high water mark (Hatfield et al., 2012).
Note: For the Canadian portion of the Columbia River, river kilometres start at Hugh L. Keenleyside Dam (HLK) Dam in Castlegar and increase moving downstream to the Canada/U.S. border (HLK = 0 km, Canada/U.S. border ~ 57.0 km). River kilometres also increase on the upstream side of HLK Dam, starting at 0 km at the dam and increasing to the headwaters of the Columbia River.