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Southern Flying Squirrel (Glaucomys Volans)

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COSEWIC
Assessment Summary

 

Assessment Summary – April 2006

Common name:

Southern flying squirrel - Atlantic (Nova Scotia) population

Scientific name:
Glaucomys volans

Status:
Not at Risk

Reason for Designation:
Southern flying squirrels are small inconspicuous nocturnal forest-dwelling rodents with impressive gliding ability. They are difficult to distinguish from the northern flying squirrel. In Nova Scotia, the southern species was first detected in 1971, and until 2001, was only known from seven sites. New recent research located southern flying squirrels in 32 locations and over a much wider area in the southern part of the province than expected. Like a number of species in Nova Scotia, it is at the north of its range and disjunct. Habitat loss through deforestation and fragmentation of intact forest may lead to extirpation of some local populations, but does not currently pose a threat to the species' persistence and the population appears stable.

Occurrence:
Nova Scotia

Status history:
Designated Special Concern in April 1988. Split into two populations in April 2006 and the Atlantic (Nova Scotia) population was designated Not at Risk. Last assessment based on an update status report.

 

Assessment Summary – April 2006

Common name:

Southern flying squirrel - Great Lakes Plains population

Scientific name:
Glaucomys volans

Status:
Not at Risk

Reason for Designation:
Southern flying squirrels are small inconspicuous nocturnal forest-dwelling rodents with impressive gliding ability. They are difficult to distinguish from the northern flying squirrel. Dedicated sampling programs have generally revealed greater abundance and range than previously assumed. Its known area of occupancy has expanded. Habitat loss through deforestation and fragmentation of remaining forest may lead to extirpation of some local populations in the southern part of its range in Ontario, but does not currently pose a threat to the persistence of this population. The overall trend in habitat availability is stable or positive. Recent research in Ontario has revealed a much wider range of suitable habitat and reported a substantial range expansion. There is little information on this squirrel from Quebec as there have been no directed surveys for this species.

Occurrence:
Ontario and Quebec

Status history:
Designated Special Concern in April 1988. Split into two populations in April 2006 and the Great Lakes Plains population was designated Not at Risk. Last assessment based on an update status report.