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Southern Flying Squirrel (Glaucomys Volans)

Technical Summary - Great Lakes Plains population

Glaucomys volans

southern flying squirrel - Great Lakes Plains population

petit polatouche

Range of Occurrence in Canada: Ontario and Quebec


Extent and Area Information

Extent of occurrence (EO) (km2)
Calculated as Minimum Convex Polygon of known locations in Great Lakes (Ontario / Québec) population
Ontario / Québec:
~160 000 km2
Specify trend in EOON: medium term (decades) – probably increasing; year-to-year – prone to fluctuations at northern range limit

QC: unknown
Are there extreme fluctuations in EO?Possible at northern range limit
Area of occupancy (AO) (km2)unknown
Specify trend in AOUnknown
Are there extreme fluctuations in AO?Possible at northern range limit
Number of known or inferred current locationsunknown
Specify trend in #overall, probably stable
Are there extreme fluctuations in number of locations?Possible at northern range limit
Specify trend in area, extent or quality of habitatVariable but overall probably stable


Population Information

Generation time (average age of parents in the population)1.5 years
Number of mature individualsunknown
Total population trendunknown
% decline over the last/next 10 years or 3 generationsunknown
Are there extreme fluctuations in number of mature individuals?No, but range in Ontario may vary widely according to winter weather
Is the total population severely fragmented?Southwestern ON: yes (except Norfolk Co)

Central / Eastern ON: probably not

QC: unknown.
Specify trend in number of populationsstable
Are there extreme fluctuations in number  of populations?no
List populations with number of mature individuals in each


Threats (actual or imminent threats to populations or habitats)

habitat loss. Specifically,
- removal of mature hardwood mast trees (particularly oak, beech and hickory)
- removal of cavity trees
predation by domestic cats


Rescue Effect (immigration from an outside source)

Status of outside population(s)?
USA: Secure (N5)
Michigan: S5
New York: S5
Vermont: S4
New Hampshire: S5
Is immigration known or possible?Very limited. Only across Québec – USA border south of St. Lawrence R., where their presence is unknown on both sides of border.
Would immigrants be adapted to survive in Canada?yes
Is there sufficient habitat for immigrants in Canada?yes
Is rescue from outside populations likely?no


Quantitative Analysis

not conducted
 


Current Status

COSEWIC: Special Concern, 1988
Not at Risk, 2006


Status and Reasons for Designation

Status:
Not at Risk
Alpha-numeric code:
n/a
Reasons for Designation:
Southern flying squirrels are small inconspicuous nocturnal forest-dwelling rodents with impressive gliding ability. They are difficult to distinguish from the northern flying squirrel. Dedicated sampling programs have generally revealed greater abundance and range than previously assumed. Its known area of occupancy has expanded. Habitat loss through deforestation and fragmentation of remaining forest may lead to extirpation of some local populations in the southern part of its range in Ontario, but does not currently pose a threat to the persistence of this population. The overall trend in habitat availability is stable or positive. Recent research in Ontario has revealed a much wider range of suitable habitat and reported a substantial range expansion. There is little information on this squirrel from Quebec as there have been no directed surveys for this species.


Applicability of Criteria

Criterion A (Declining Total Population):
There is no evidence of a declining trend, although numbers and range can decrease substantially following harsh winters.
Criterion B (Small Distribution, and Decline or Fluctuation):
Extent of occurrence is over 150 000 km2 and there is no clear evidence of decline. The exact extent of fluctuations due to harsh winters is unknown, but recolonization following local extirpation appears rapid.
Criterion C (Small Total Population Size and Decline):
Total population size is unknown but likely in the thousands. No evidence of decline, range of suitable habitat appears greater than previously thought.
Criterion D (Very Small Population or Restricted Distribution):
Total population size is unknown but likely in the thousands.
Criterion E (Quantitative Analysis):
Not available.

 

Technical Summary - Atlantic (Nova Scotia) population

Glaucomys volans

southern flying squirrel - Atlantic (Nova Scotia) population

petit polatouche

Range of Occurrence in Canada: Nova Scotia


Extent and Area Information

Extent of occurrence (EO) (km2)
Calculated as Minimum Convex Polygon of known locations
6300 km2
Specify trend in EOprobably stable
Are there extreme fluctuations in EO?No
Area of occupancy (AO) (km2)unknown
Specify trend in AOprobably stable
Are there extreme fluctuations in AO?unknown
Number of known or inferred current locationsunknown
Specify trend in #Probably stable
Are there extreme fluctuations in number of locations?unknown
Specify trend in area, extent or quality of habitatdecreasing


Population Information

Generation time (average age of parents in the population)1.5 years
Number of mature individualsunknown
Total population trendunknown
% decline over the last/next 10 years or 3 generationsunknown
Are there extreme fluctuations in number of mature individuals?unknown
Is the total population severely fragmented?unlikely
Specify trend in number of populationsprobably stable
Are there extreme fluctuations in number  of populations?unlikely
List populations with number of mature individuals in each


Threats (actual or imminent threats to populations or habitats)

habitat loss. Specifically,
- conversion of mature hardwood and mixedwood forests to conifer stands
- removal of mature hardwood mast trees (particularly oak, beech and hickory)
- removal of cavity trees
predation by domestic cats


Rescue Effect (immigration from an outside source)

Status of outside population(s)?
USA: Secure (N5)
Maine: SU
Is immigration known or possible?no
Would immigrants be adapted to survive in Canada?yes
Is there sufficient habitat for immigrants in Canada?yes
Is rescue from outside populations likely?no


Quantitative Analysis

not conducted
 


Current Status

COSEWIC: Special Concern, 1988
Not at Risk, 2006


Status and Reasons for Designation

Status:
Not at Risk
Alpha-numeric code:
n/a
Reasons for Designation:
Southern flying squirrels are small inconspicuous nocturnal forest-dwelling rodents with impressive gliding ability. They are difficult to distinguish from the northern flying squirrel. In Nova Scotia, the southern species was first detected in 1971, and until 2001, was only known from seven sites. New recent research located southern flying squirrels in 32 locations and over a much wider area in the southern part of the province than expected. Like a number of species in Nova Scotia, it is at the north of its range and disjunct. Habitat loss through deforestation and fragmentation of intact forest may lead to extirpation of some local populations, but does not currently pose a threat to the species’ persistence and the population appears stable.


Applicability of Criteria

Criterion A (Declining Total Population):
There is no evidence of a declining trend, although numbers and range can decrease substantially following harsh winters.
Criterion B (Small Distribution, and Decline or Fluctuation):
Extent of occurrence is 6500 km2 and there is no clear evidence of decline.
Criterion C (Small Total Population Size and Decline):
Total population size is unknown but likely in the thousands. No evidence of decline, range of suitable habitat appears greater than previously thought.
Criterion D (Very Small Population or Restricted Distribution):
Total population size is unknown but likely in the thousands.
Criterion E (Quantitative Analysis):
Not available.