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Woodland Caribou (Rangifer Tarandus Caribou)

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COSEWIC
Assessment Summary

 

Assessment Summary – May 2002

Common name:

Woodland caribou (Atlantic-Gaspésie population)

Scientific name:
Rangifer tarandus caribou

Status:
Endangered

Reason for designation:
A small isolated population of less than 200 adult animals confined to the Gaspésie region. The population is at risk from predation and habitat loss.

Occurrence:
Quebec

Status history:
Atlantic-Gaspésie population was designated as Threatened in April 1984. Status re-examined and uplisted to Endangered in May 2000. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2002. Last assesment based on an update status report. 

 

Assessment Summary – May 2002

Common name:

Woodland caribou (Boreal population)

Scientific name:
Rangifer tarandus caribou

Status:
Threatened

Reason for designation:
A widespread population ranging across the boreal forests of northern Canada. Populations have decreased throughout most of the range. Threatened from habitat loss and increased predation, the latter possibly facilitated by human activities.

Occurrence:
Northwest Territories, British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Newfoundland-Labrador

Status history:
Boreal population was designated Threatened in May 2000. This newly defined population is comprised of a portion of the de-activated "Western population" and all of the de-activated "Labrador-Ungava population". Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

 

Assessment Summary – May 2002

Common name:

Woodland caribou (Southern Mountain population)

Scientific name:
Rangifer tarandus caribou

Status:
Threatened

Reason for designation:
Local herds in the Southern Mountain population are generally small, increasingly isolated, and subject to multiple developments. Their range has shrunk by up to 40% and 13 of 19 herds are declining. The most southerly herds are likely to disappear. Many herds are threatened by decreasing habitat quantity and quality, harassment and predation.

Occurrence:
British Columbia, Alberta

Status history:
Southern Mountain population was designated Threatened in May 2000. This population was formerly designated as part of the "Western population" (now de-activated). Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

 

Assessment Summary – May 2002

Common name:

Woodland caribou (Northern Mountain population)

Scientific name:
Rangifer tarandus caribou

Status:
Special Concern

Reason for designation:
Forestry, roads and other developments in the range of this population are beginning to affect some herds, through habitat modification and increased human access. Most of the habitat is currently remote and has changed little. Most of the population of over 35 000 adults appears stable but is particularly dependent on conservation actions, such as management plans. Two of 39 herds within this population are declining and may be at risk from changing predator-prey relationships and greater motor vehicle access.

Occurrence:
Yukon Territory, Northwest Territories, British Columbia

Status history:
Northern Mountain population was designated Not at Risk in May 2000. This population was formerly designated as part of the "Western population" (now de-activated). Status re-examined and uplisted to Special Concern in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.

 

Assessment Summary – May 2002

Common name:

Woodland caribou (Newfoundland population)

Scientific name:
Rangifer tarandus caribou

Status:
Not at Risk

Reason for designation:
There are about 85 000 adult caribou in Newfoundland, and they are less subject to predation than caribou elsewhere in Canada because of the absence of wolves. Only one of 27 herds is reported as decreasing and most of the habitat appears secure. The recent arrival of coyotes, however, may increase predation pressure in the future.

Occurrence:
Newfoundland-Labrador

Status history:
Newfoundland population designated Not at Risk in April 1984. Status re-examined and confirmed in May 2000 and in May 2002. Last assessment based on an update status report.