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  3. > Recovery Strategy for the Alberta populations of Westslope Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi) in Canada: Table 3
Table 3. Examples of activities likely to result in the destruction of critical habitat for Westslope Cutthroat Trout
Threat Activity Affected Pathway Function Affected Feature Affected Attribute Affected Provincial or National Parks
Changes in flow Dam/reservoir operation Reduction in available habitats
  • Spawning
  • Nursery
  • Feeding
  • Movement (include migration, feeding etc.)
  • Cover
  • Riffles
  • Pools
  • Runs
  • Backwaters
  • Discharge and velocities
  • Sediment/silt
  • Substrates
  • Depths
  • Temperature
  • Large woody debris, bedrock, boulders, riparian vegetation
  • Invertebrate production
  • Undercut banks
  • Provincial
  • National Parks
Mechanical forest removal and loss due to fire Reduction in available habitats
  • Spawning
  • Nursery
  • Overwintering
  • Feeding
  • Cover
  • Riffles
  • Pools
  • Runs
  • Backwaters
  • Discharge and velocities
  • Sediment/silt
  • Substrates
  • Depths
  • Temperature
  • Large woody debris, bedrock, boulders, riparian vegetation
  • Invertebrate production
  • Undercut banks
  • Provincial
Water extraction Reduction in available habitats
  • Spawning
  • Nursery
  • Overwintering
  • Feeding
  • Cover
  • Riffles
  • Pools
  • Runs
  • Backwaters
  • Discharge and velocities
  • Sediment/silt
  • Substrates
  • Depths
  • Temperature
  • Large woody debris, bedrock, boulders, riparian vegetation
  • Invertebrate production
  • Undercut banks
  • Provincial
Sedimentation Forest harvest, linear disturbance (road or trail construction and maintenance or lack of maintenance etc.), urbanization, mining, grazing, high intensity or frequent off-highway vehicle use, recreational access, instream construction Increased sediment/silt (embeddedness) Reduction in available habitats
  • Spawning
  • Nursery
  • Overwintering
  • Feeding
  • Cover
  • Riffles
  • Pools
  • Runs
  • Backwaters
  • Food availability
  • Increased sediment/silt
  • Substrates
  • Depths
  • Temperature
  • Invertebrate production
  • Undercut banks
  • Provincial
Habitat loss, fragmentation and or alteration Dam or reservoir creation Large scale change from riverine to reservoir habitat
  • Spawning
  • Nursery
  • Overwintering
  • Feeding
  • Cover
  • Riffles
  • Pools
  • Runs
  • Backwaters
  • Food availability
  • Discharge and velocities
  • Sediment/silt
  • Substrates
  • Depths
  • Temperature
  • Large woody debris, bedrock, boulders, riparian vegetation
  • Invertebrate production
  • Undercut banks
  • Provincial
  • National Parks
Dams (include weirs) or culvert structures Loss of access to habitats
  • Movement
  • Movement routes in water-bodies
  • Barrier-free movement to complete life cycle
  • Provincial
  • National Parks
Linear disturbance (construction and maintenance or lack of maintenance of roads, pipelines, railway, recreational vehicles, trails) Reduction in available habitats
  • Spawning
  • Nursery
  • Overwintering
  • Feeding
  • Cover
  • Riffles
  • Pools
  • Runs
  • Backwaters
  • Food availability
  • Movement
  • Sediment/silt
  • Substrates
  • Temperature
  • Large woody debris, bedrock, boulders, riparian vegetation
  • Invertebrate production
  • Undercut banks
  • Provincial
  • National Parks

Return to Recovery Strategy for the Westslope Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi), Alberta Populations in Canada: Table 3

Sources: (COSEWIC 2000; Woodliffe pers. comm.2010; Pratt pers. comm.2010; and Jacobs pers. comm. 2010). 

  • [1]Level of Concern: signifies that managing the threat is of (high, medium or low) concern for the recovery of the species, consistent with the population and distribution objectives. This criterion considers the assessment of all the information in the table).
  • [2]Severity: reflects the population-level effect (High: very large population-level effect, Moderate, Low, Unknown).
  • [3]Causal certainty: reflects the degree of evidence that is known for the threat (High: available evidence strongly links the threat to stresses on population viability; Medium: there is a correlation between the threat and population viability e.g. expert opinion; Low: the threat is assumed or plausible).
  • [4]Threat categories are listed in order of decreasing significance.

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Date Modified:
2014-04-01