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COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Barndoor Skate Dipturus laevis in Canada (2011)
    Barndoor Skate is one of the largest skates in the western Atlantic, reaching a total length of 163 cm. Another common name is the sharpnose skate and, in French, it is called grande raie. It is distinguished from other skates by (collectively) having an acute snout, a relative absence of thorns, an upper surface that is generally brown with numerous dark spots, and an oval spot or eye in the centre of each pectoral fin (wing). The lower surface ...
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Batwing Vinyl Lichen Leptogium platynum in Canada (2011)
    The Batwing Vinyl Lichen (Leptogium platynum) is a distinctive rock-dwelling “jellyskin” lichen characterized by leafy, medium-sized lobes and a dark bluish upper surface usually bearing numerous fruit bodies and occasional tiny lobules which function as vegetative propagules. It is unusual among cyanolichens in its almost invariable production of both sexual and vegetative propagules. It has its northern limits in southern coastal Br ...
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Blue Felt Lichen Degelia plumbea in Canada (2011)
    The Blue Felt Lichen, Degelia plumbea is a large, blue-grey, leafy lichen that has longitudinal ridges and crescent-shaped curves which often give it a scallop-like shape. A prominent beard-like fungal mat (hypothallus) that is usually blue-black protrudes beyond the margin of the thallus, which may exceed 10 centimetres in diameter. Vegetative propagules are lacking. Sexual reproductive structures are usually present and numerous. The fruit bodi ...
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Butler’s Gartersnake Thamnophis butler in Canada (2011)
    Butler’s Gartersnake (Thamnophis butleri) is a small, non-aggressive gartersnake with three distinct longitudinal yellow stripes on its dark brown back. This snake was first described in 1889 by E.D. Cope. Like most other small Canadian snakes, this species has been poorly studied. It is often confused with two other Thamnophis species coexisting in its range, the Eastern Gartersnake, T. sirtalis, and the Eastern Ribbonsnake, ...
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Cerulean Warbler Dendroica cerulea in Canada (2011)
    The Cerulean Warbler (Dendroica cerulea) is a small (8-10g) wood-warbler.
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Update Status Report on the Cerulean Warbler in Canada (2011)
    The Cerulean Warbler (Dendroica cerulea) is a small (8-10g) wood-warbler.
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Chestnut Lamprey Ichthyomyzon castaneus in Canada (2011)
    The Chestnut Lamprey is a parasitic species that attains a maximum size of 363 mm in total length as an adult and 165 mm as a larva. It has a single indented dorsal fin. Larger larvae (greater than approximately 95 mm) can be distinguished from all other Canadian lampreys by the presence of darkly pigmented lateral line organs. Adults can be distinguished from the two other Canadian lamprey species that have a single dorsal fin, Silver Lamprey an ...
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Columbia Sculpin Cottus hubbsi in Canada (2011)
    The Columbia Sculpin is a small, bottom-dwelling fish with a body shape that tapers from a relatively large head and pectoral fins to a narrow caudal (tail) fin area. The Columbia Sculpin reaches a maximum total length of about 110 millimeters. The Columbia Sculpin is distinguished from other co-occurring sculpins by a relatively long head, a complete lateral line, and striking broad, dark bars on the caudal fin, and oblique dark bars on the ...
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Crumpled Tarpaper Lichen Collema coniophilum in Canada (2011)
    Crumpled Tarpaper Lichen, Collema coniophilum, is a distinctive, moderately sized leafy lichen with several broad, mostly rounded lobes, at most 2-4 (-5) mm wide. The smooth upper surface is dark olive green to blackish brown that becomes weakly and sparsely covered in low “blisters” that eventually expand upwards into low broad ridges. Small, blackish, finger-like protrusions are present on the upper surface, and contrast with the upper surface. ...
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Night Snake (Hypsiglena torquata) in Canada - 2001 (2011)
    The Night Snake is a small snake with dark grey or brown blotches on a light grey or brown back, and a yellowish or white belly. While it is technically venomous, it is a member of the family of “harmless snakes”, which includes most Canadian species of snakes. The Canadian population is identified as the deserticola subspecies of Hypsiglena torquata.
  • COSEWIC Status Appraisal Summary on the Desert Nightsnake Hypsiglena chlorophaea in Canada (2011)
    The Night Snake is a small snake with dark grey or brown blotches on a light grey or brown back, and a yellowish or white belly. While it is technically venomous, it is a member of the family of “harmless snakes”, which includes most Canadian species of snakes. The Canadian population is identified as the deserticola subspecies of Hypsiglena torquata.
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma malma (Western Arctic populations) in Canada (2011)
    Dolly Varden char belongs to the family of salmon- and trout-like fishes. Two subspecies of Dolly Varden are recognized in Canada, the southern form (“Dolly Varden (Pacific populations)”) and the northern form (“Dolly Varden (Western Arctic populations)”). The latter is the focus of this status report. As they mature, Dolly Varden (Western Arctic populations) change colour and shape, and grow in size, reaching more th ...
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Dune Tachinid Fly Germaria angustata in Canada (2011)
    The Dune Tachinid Fly, Germaria angustata (Zetterstedt), is a black, bristly, medium-sized fly in the family Tachinidae. The second segment of the antennal branch (arista) is elongated and the third aristomere is flattened side-to-side; these two features give the arista a distinctive, elbowed appearance which helps to identify this species. This fly is significant in that it represents a group of invertebrate and plant species (a number of whic ...
  • COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Dwarf Lake Iris Iris lacustris in Canada - 2011 (2011)
    Dwarf lake iris (Iris lacustris) is a small iris reaching a height of about 10 cm with broadly linear, curved leaves. Flowers are showy, 3-5 cm wide, usually blue. The plant spreads vegetatively by rhizomes, and can form very large colonies of interconnected stems.
  • COSEWIC assessment and status report on the dwarf lake iris Iris lacustris in Canada - 2004 (2011)
    Dwarf lake iris (Iris lacustris) is a small iris reaching a height of about 10 cm with broadly linear, curved leaves. Flowers are showy, 3-5 cm wide, usually blue. The plant spreads vegetatively by rhizomes, and can form very large colonies of interconnected stems.

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